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Question Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation ( AVS Forum DVD Recorders )
Updated: 2008-05-11 20:53:04 (2766)
Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

Philips DVDR3575H/37 and DVDR3576H/37 Features, Setup and Operation
On July 9, 2008, Philips announced they "will stop producing new DVD recorders after 2009...."
Forget everything you've been told or thought you knew about Philips DVD recorders, the original 3575 and its replacement 3576 are a new and better breed. They're the only decent DVD recorders with hard disk drive (HDD) and SDTV digital tuners available in North America. In fact, the 3575 was a CES Innovation Award Honoree in the Video Components category. Everything in this thread applies to both units, unless stated otherwise.

The only known change in the 3576 is a black case and new Front-End (FE) Firmware. The User Manuals are identical. Each has a 160GB Seagate HDD, a DVD drive, NTSC/ATSC/QAM tuners, DV input, coax and optical digital audio out, 1080p HDMI upconvert, 36 program timer slots, and amplified coax passthru of SDTV and HDTV signals.

Each is solid, reliable and easy-to-use as a simple, cost-effective ($199-248) way to record your daily and weekly shows completely unattended, so you can visit your folks in Poughkeepsie for a month and your shows will be recorded and ready to watch WHILE it's recording the next month's shows, AND YOU'LL NEVER TOUCH A DISC! Also, it's the only device you'll need to copy, edit and dub your family's home movies from your VCR or camcorder to DVD discs.

You won't need a digital converter box wherever you've got one of these, and the HDD will spoil you rotten!

3575: $234 Circuit City... $199 Philips Refurb.... Manual... Support... Spare Parts.
3576: $248 Sams Club... $287 Wal-Mart... Google Checkout... Manual... Support... Remote for both $20.00.
Under "Accessories," Sams offers 2- and 3-yr ext. warranties, and Wal-Mart a 2-yr ext. warranty.

Click links below for more info, esp. #1, before you make a single-disc mistake!
  1. The MANY Advantages of a HDD Recorder!
  2. Basic Features
  3. Pics, Panels, Remote, Spare Parts, HDD Info/Pics, and Heat/EMI/CP Alert!
  4. HDTV Passthru and Recording Widescreen (WS) Programs
  5. Average Variable Bit Rate (VBR) for Each Rec Mode
  6. OTA-ATSC and Cable-QAM Channels the 3575/76 Can Tune by Itself
  7. Digital Channels in an Analog Cable Feed
  8. Picture Quality (PQ) for Watching, Recording and Copying
  9. Basic System Connections (w/Diagrams)
  10. Settings for Clock, S-Video Input, TV Aspect, Progressive Scan, Disc Audio, and HDMI
  11. Channel Scanning with Auto and Manual Channel Preset
  12. Manual, Timed and Timer Recording from Tuner, Set-Top Box, DVR, VCR or Camera
  13. Recording Fast-Action Sports, Racing, etc.
  14. Recording Closed Captions (Analog Only)
  15. Upconverting, Chase Play, Pause Live TV, Commercial Skip/Replay, and Zoom
  16. Playback, Resume Playback, Pause, FF, REW, Slo-Mo, Rapid Play with Audio, and Play Priority
  17. Title EDIT/DELETE and Using/Editing CHAPTER MARKS
  18. Recommended DVDs and Checking Media ID (MID) with the Unique On-Board Disc Utility
  19. DVD Recording, Dubbing, Finalizing/Unfinalizing, Checking, Titling, Auto-Play, Empty Title, Loading, etc.
  20. The MANY Advantages of High-Speed Dub (HSD)
  21. Multigenerational and Mode-Conversion Dubbing
  22. The Multi-Talented INFO Button!
  23. Known Problems and Some "Heads-Up"
  24. Notes on Erroneous or Misleading National Reviews
  25. HDD Care and Maintenance
  26. The SKIP-#-#-# Codes
  27. Making Music/Audio DVDs
  28. PC/Mac Editing of Philips 3575 and Other +VR Files
  29. Using the 3575/76 as a Digital Converter to Watch Digital Channels on Analog TVs and Record Them on Analog DVDRs


The Philips DVDR3576H/37


Some Philips DVDR model markings:
H = DVDR with Hard Disk Drive (HDD) . . V = DVDR with VCR . . No letter = Single-disc DVDR . . /37 = North Am . . /37B = Refurb.

44,755 words so far...

Answers: Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation ( AVS Forum DVD Recorders )
Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

The Multi-Talented INFO Button!

The INFO button at bottom-right of cursor-key circle brings up several screens in succession by repeated pressing of the button, and those screens change to suit the media being INFO'd.

For video on an analog channel, the first screen provides information on channel, video resolution, audio type, drive currently active, and HDD time remaining at selected rec modes. For video on a digital channel, the first screen shows TVG/show info, if available, then the 2nd screen shows the same info as on an analog channel. On either an analog or digital channel, and with an HDMI cable connected to the TV, the last screen always shows HDMI info regardless of whether the TV's HDMI input is selected or not.

One of the screens has 9 playback control icons for viewing and setting specific playback options.

Changing Rec Mode and Checking HDD and DVD Capacity

Since the 3575/76's REC MODE button, bottom left on remote, is set up to CHANGE rec mode on first press, it's easy to accidentally CHANGE rec mode when all you wanted to do is CHECK the current setting... nothing worse than finding out, after a recording, that you had the wrong rec mode by accident. Here's where the INFO button comes in handy.

Instead of using the REC MODE button just to check the current setting, or even to change it, with TV on any channel, press the INFO button and check the text in the bottom-right corner of the screen. That shows rec mode and space left at the current rec mode... HDD space if HDD side is active and/or DVD space if DVD side is selected and a DVD in the tray. An icon in upper right corner shows which drive you're currently INFOing. You can change to either drive while in this INFO screen.

If you want to change rec mode, you can do it here by pressing the REC MODE button. You can also determine how full your HDD is by comparing HDD time remaining with the total time listed on pg 39 of the manual... a little "mental math" is reqd.

Controlling Video Playback

The 3575/76 has a very useful video playback feature under the INFO button that really should be called Playback Central... maybe "Playground" Central cuz, once you know your way around, you'll be like a kid again, trying to find new ways to get into trouble!

Most everything you might need or want to do with playback can be commanded and controlled in this on-screen display. Pressing the INFO button while playing brings up the INFO menu and control icons at the top of the TV screen.

This is a graphic that shows what appears along the top of the playback pic after pressing the INFO button:



There are 9 control icons in the 2nd row. From left to right, they are:



Search - Allows playback by Title, Chapter or Time point in the selected title. During playback, the INFO menu starts on the Search (?) icon (it's already highlighted). Click OK on this icon and it moves you up to the top row, where there are three sections: Title (T), Chapter (C), and Time (digital clock). For CDs, there will be Track (T) and Time; Track/Time will not work if you select Random Play from the CD Playback menu under Setup, but will if using Program Play or normal play (just pressing Play).
In the T section, arrow up/dn or enter numbers directly, then press OK to play the Title # you selected (always starts play at 0:00:00). Arrow right to the C section, arrow up/dn or enter numbers directly, then press OK to play the Chapter # you selected (always starts play at 1st frame of chapter). Arrow right to first set of hr:min:sec time digits, arrow up/dn or enter time directly, then press OK to go to that time in the title immediately. (Total time of that title is shown in a 2nd set of hr:min:sec numbers.) You can also search CDs the same way with this function.

Note: Unique feature: when searching for start of next title, each arrow-up on the 1st clock segment advances one hour exactly, even tho you might currently be at an odd time, e.g., if you're currently on 1:18:35, arrow up on 1st number segment to hour 2 and it goes to 2:00:00, not 2:18:35. It knows you want to start at the beginning of the hour ! Just press OK to go there. Of course, you could also enter minutes in each clock segment, if desired.
Arrow right from the Search (?) icon to select each of the other 8 controls. Just arrowing right activates a control within 1 sec, or you can press OK after arrowing right to activate the control immediately (indicated below by "Activate"). If no options pop up, there are no options under that icon/feature. Use arrow up/dn and OK to select an option. Exit anytime with the INFO button.

Audio - Activates the speaker control for selecting Audio options. It displays and checks/highlights the type of audio being played and gives you any other available options you can select with arrow up/dn and OK buttons(languages, DD types, etc.).

Subtitle - Activates the Subtitle control for selecting subtitle language(s), if available. For DVDs only.

Angle - Activates the Angle control for selecting camera angle(s), if available. For DVDs only.

Repeat - Activates the Repeat control for selecting a type of repeat play, if desired.

Marker - Activates the Marker control for selecting up to six "bookmarks" at playback points you might want to return to. Use this icon to go directly and instantly to one of your marked spots. Markers can be in one title or in multiple titles. See below for one special use for this Marker function.

Noise Reduction - Activates the NR control for selecting three video noise-reduction levels: Off, Type 1 for SLP or other long rec mode with video noise, or Type 2 for even stronger NR.

Zoom - Activates the Zoom control for selecting four zoom levels: 1.0x, 1.2x, 1.5x, 2.0x. To go back to normal view, press the INFO button again.

Surround - Activates the Surround control for selecting three surround options: Off, Type 1 (natural), Type 2 (emphasized).

One Special Use for the Marker Function?

From reading the manual (p74), I thought the Marker feature was only for marking spots in a single title as places you might want to return to later for additional viewing. However, I found that you can place a Marker in multiple titles, then use the Marker menu to go instantly to those spots by clicking the Marker in the INFO menu.

One use for this might be for political "junkies" to set up two or more politicians speaking on an issue or answering a question. Set a marker for each where they start to speak on the same subject, then play each one quickly in sequential order... no searching, etc. Maybe a teacher/instructor using video as a self-help tool for instructors who record their classroom and later review key points and compare teaching methods. Maybe a law school professor to show different courtroom action by various lawyers for do's and don'ts w/o queuing up tapes or searching thru titles, delays that might "kill" the immediate visual comparison. Maybe some sports action?

Another use would be for an easy way to play Titles, like your favorite Soap episodes, IN RECORDED ORDER so you can follow the developing story line. Might be esp. useful if you've got LOTS of titles spread about in multiple pages of the Title menu. One 3575 user went on a 3.5 week trip and had 35 Titles on 6 pages to sort thru.

There's no automatic "sequential play" mode for videos (just CDs and VCDs), but even if there were, you'd still have to go find the Titles, "mark" them for auto-play, and set their specific sequence. The Marker method provides one way to accomplish the same thing, at least for 6 titles in sequence.

For doing this, the procedure would be:
  1. Start the 1st title playing and PAUSE immediately.
  2. Press the INFO button.
  3. Arrow right to the 4th icon and press OK.
  4. In 1st Marker position, press OK button. This sets a Marker there.
  5. Press Title button to get Title menu again.
  6. Play 2nd desired title, PAUSE, set marker, press Title button, etc. until you've marked the first six titles at their very beginning. Pretty easy, really.
Now you can play each of those first six titles in the order you pre-ordained by opening the INFO menu and pressing OK on the Markers in order, top to bottom. Each title will start playing from the marked position, which is the very beginning where you Paused or, obviously, any other point you marked. You could mix-n-match Markers with one in one title, two in another, three in another, as needed.

Markers PERSIST until you delete them using the CLEAR button or delete the title, so you can turn the machine off and use them at a later time. You'd do another six titles by CLEARing the old Markers and placing new ones. Deleting or Dividing a title also deletes its marker(s).


wajo

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

Recommended DVDs and Checking Media ID (MID) with the Unique On-Board Disc Utility
  1. For an intro to DVD basics, a good ref. is here, in videohelp.com.
  2. The reason we can fit only 4424 MB, or 4.4 GB, of info on a "4.7 GB" disc is simply the difference in figuring capacity: disc mfgrs use the decimal numbering system based on 1000, while our DVDRs (and computers) use the binary system based on 1024.
Philips has tested and recommends the following DVD brands and speeds:

Verbatim - -DVD+R/-R 8x, DVD+RW 4x, DVD-RW 2x
JVC - - - - -DVD-RW 4x
Maxell - - - -DVD+R 4x/8x/16x, DVD-R 8x/16x
SONY - - - -DVD+R 4x/8x/16x, DVD+RW 4x
TDK - - - - -DVD+R 4x/8x/16x

This doesn't mean you can't use other disc brands and speeds. In fact, one of the best is Taiyo Yuden (TY), except they can only be purchased on the internet at supermediastore.com, rima.com, and others. People here seem to like the 8X "Premium" best (not "Value" line).
In an article on TY media in cdfreaks.com, the author says this about the possibility of fake TY and how to tell the diff.: "No faked discs with TY-style hub codes are known, so these codes are safe to check with. Genuine TY media smells like peaches, because they're made in Fukushima, Japan, which is known as the "Fruit Kingdom"!"
Be aware that, in the list above, Verbatim is the best, SONY can be fake (however, see "Note on Codes" at bottom of page), and TDK no longer makes their own consumer DVDs. In the 3rd Qtr of 2007, Imation bought TDK Recording Media and Memcorp (Memorex). Imation farms out a lot of mfg to CMC Magnetics and Optodisc who often, but not always, make landfill material.

My high-speed dubs of 2-hr-SP titles take ~25 min. on 1-4X discs and ~30 min. on 1-16X discs. However, here's one user who HS dubs to 1-4X discs in 20-21 min.! Reading this, I tested a 2:02:53 SP movie to a 1-16X disc and it took 35 min., but only 27 min. on a 1-2X -RW and a 4X -RW. Can't wait to try 8X discs.

Lots of people use 1-16X discs (I'm one), so they're certainly a good option, but I'm "suspicious" of 1-16X media. When Verbatim first announced their new 1-16X media, they said they had successfully "extended" their 8X media to 16X. I think a NEW formula would have sounded more impressive than an "extended" one... what'd they do, add a "thinner" so it'd go twice as fast?

DVD quality is a big, important issue if you want them to last a long time.

Cheaper, lower-quality discs seem to "fade" faster until they are no longer playable. This may be due to a marginal burn to start with (lots of errors but below the unacceptable threshhold) and/or poor-quality media and tools used in manufacture. (See this post by Sean Nelson, who checks his Pioneer DVDR burns on a computer and tracks their stability over time.)

One of the reasons you should care about disc quality is the incredible accuracy and consistency required for good DVD burning at home. You're using a laser beam to burn video and audio streams into a thin layer of organic dye or metal alloy that has concentric tracks only 0.74 micrometers (um) apart. The laser has to follow those tracks precisely from hub to outside rim with the disc rotating at a very high speed.

To help visualize just the track-spacing element of this process, consider this: a female dust mite, which we can't see, can cover more than 400 tracks on a DVD! (Females are plumper than males, so they're more "impressive" for this visualization )

What's the message of the dust mite? KEEP DUST AWAY FROM YOUR DISC TRAY OPENING! (...ROFL...just a joke... sort of!)

How Long Will DVDs Last?

No matter what you've read about DVD longevity, if you start with cheap or fake media AND get a bad burn cuz of that, those DVDs might serve as "coasters" after you learn they're unplayable from the get-go. Even if your "burn-on-the-cheap" happens to be an initial success, the DVD may then be playable for only a few months or year at best.

If you use the best blank DVDs you can afford (typically 30 cents each), they should last from 30-100 years, depending on which expert theorist you believe.

Aother theory to note: archivists don't recommend rewriteable -RW or +RW discs for very long-term storage since their burn layer is made from a phase-changing metal alloy film that's designed to accommodate rewriting (multiple changes between burned and erased states). DVD-R and +R discs are better for long-term storage cuz they're made with an organic-dye burn layer that's designed to change only once... during their one-and-only burn cycle.

DVD+R/RW may produce better burns due to the plus-format's inherently better design for tracking, speed control and addressing (location on the disc), esp. at higher burn speeds. For some unknown reason, this subject can be very contentious, so 'nuff said here.

Here's a ref. article by a well-known and respected DVD guru for more info. See esp. "Pre-pits versus ADIP" discussion, but ignore the following section on "Defect Management" and DVD+MRW Mount Rainier... it's a hardware implementation and not used in consumer recorders. The section on "Multiple recording sessions and compatibility" farther down is also interesting.

Be aware that DVD+R/RW discs FF/REW normally in Philips, Magnavox, and other Funai/Philips DVDRs (~50% of DVDRs in NA) but not all speeds in Pios and Pannys. As far as universal compatibility, in 2006, a German magazine did multiple-unit tests and found -R was 95% compatible and +R was 93% compatible (but 95% if it was bit-set to ROM).
Oh, Oh, your first decision on using DVDs: do you care more about getting better burns or your Aunt Mabel's ability to FF and REW at all speeds with her Panny or Pio player?
If you really care about longevity, do at least steps 1 and 2 below; if you really, really care, do all four:
  1. Keep your tapes.
  2. Check your blank media batches before 1st burn with them, using the 3575/76's disc utility described below.
  3. Check all "precious-memory" burns with computer software (SW) that will show how good your initial burns really are. Nero Speed is used by many, and there are several more mentioned and recommended in this forum.
  4. Check your burned DVDs (w/SW program) over time to make sure they're still playable... you may have to drag out the tapes again!?
Using the 3575/76's Manufacturer's ID (MID) Disc Utility

The 3575/76's unique disc utility allows you to check the mfgr and media code of blank discs before you burn your precious memories to them, as well as already recorded discs (as an afterthought?). With that info, you can go to digitalfaq.com and see how it rates against their 3 Classes: 1st (Excellent), 2nd (OK), and 3rd (Crap). It also has some links to computer SW for checking disc ID for those who don't have a DVDR3575/76. The digitalfaq list was recently updated after a long hiatus!

Once you know a MID code for a disc that works for you, videohelp.com has a page here where you can:
  1. Enter a media code in the "Search Media Code" box (2nd box down).
  2. Click the "Exact search" checkbox.
  3. Click the "Search or List Media" button.
That will assemble a list, below the boxes, of all the disc brands and types that use that same media code. This gives you some alternatives for at least staying with a media code that works well for you. At the bottom of that page are several links to articles and tools for DVD use.

The simplest step you can take to assure high-quality, long-lasting burns is to use the MID utility on every new batch of discs before using the first one. Even brands/speeds you've used before could be made by someone else over time so, unfortunately, prior successful use is not a guarantee of continued success. If you run into a new batch of 2nd or 3rd (yikes!) Class discs, use those for friends who want a free copy of your stuff... it'll be like writing a "love" note with disappearing ink!?

You can access the MID utility thru the 3575's Firmware (FW) data screen.

1. Load a blank or recorded disc.

2. Press SKIP-1-2-3. A grey screen pops up with a list of model and FW version data.

3. Arrow right. Once the disc is fully loaded (~20 sec), the disc data appears.

4. Leave the screen up and check as many other blank or recorded discs as you want. (Commercial discs will show **** on the MID line.)

5. To exit, press the left arrow key back to the FW screen, then use ONLY the BACK key to exit, NOT the OK key. Pressing the OK key on the FW screen will reset the 3575 to factory settings, which you might want to do sometime but only to clear a problem and start from scratch. The Philips-recommended complete factory reset is to unplug the 3575, wait 10 minutes or so, then plug back in while holding the Standby-On button on the front of the unit.
Note on Codes: I did some tests, prompted by a kenavs suggestion, that proved the 3575/76 disc utility apparently won't show any characters after MULTIPLE null points, so SONY discs with a code of "SONY....D21" will only show "SONY". The utility WILL show a full code with a single space and single null point, such as "CMC MAG. AM3" and Sony codes like "SONY08D1". To be sure with Sony discs that just read "SONY" you'll have to check the MID in a computer to see the whole code. I use DVD Decrypter, a free program. If buying Sony discs, at least make sure the outer pkg shows Made in Japan or Made in Taiwan... some people have found the very good Sony MIJ at Walgreens.

Or, better yet, just buy Verbatim or TY Premium and be done with it!
The MID utility also shows whether the 3575/76 has a "Strategy" for that disc. That means the 3575/76 has a laser power/speed routine written into its FW for writing to that particular media code. If your disc shows NO Write Strategy, I'm not sure I'd use those discs. It doesn't mean it won't work, but it might be written using a "generic" strategy that may or may not be appropriate for that media... sounds like a marginal burn in the making and doesn't give me a "warm-and-fuzzy" feeling, to say the least.


wajo

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

The MANY Advantages of High-Speed Dub (HSD)
  1. The reason we can fit only 4424 MB, or 4.4 GB, of info on a "4.7 GB" disc is simply the difference in figuring capacity: disc mfgrs use the decimal numbering system based on 1000, while our DVDRs (and computers) use the binary system based on 1024.
  2. HSD retains ALL chapter marks in the DVD copy (auto- and custom-set). RTD strips those and sets marks only per your auto-chapter setting in the Recording menu.
  3. A dub is controlled by the machine so, once you start the dub, you can walk away... you don't have to babysit a dub.
  4. Caution: Don't start a dub if you have a timer rec program due to start within the time period of your dub. Nothing will be copied if the disc is -RW/+RW, and the disc could be ruined if -R/+R!
  5. The procedure for dubbing is here, under the title "Dubbing Single or Multiple Titles to DVD - Recommended Method".
Anything you record or copy to the HDD can be dubbed (copied) to a DVD-R, DVD+R, DVD-RW or DVD+RW disc, if desired, including music. You can use real-time dub (RTD) anytime and high-speed dub (HSD) when the title(s) will fit the 4424 MB capacity of a std DVD.

Pg 39 of the manual lists the absolute total program time at each rec mode that will fit on a std 12cm DVD if recorded or dubbed to DVD in real time. Those time/mode combinations are referred to here as "RTD Time." They'll create a file size that will always fit within the 4424 MB capacity when recording or dubbing in real-time. You have to manually set the rec mode for a RTD if diff. from your "normal" setting.

All times are for one or more titles, added together, that would be included in a dub. For example, for 2-hr-SP, that can be in one 2-hr title, two 1-hr titles, four 30-min. titles, etc.

RTD writes (encodes) titles in real time, bit by bit, and ignores any custom chapter marks; instead, it sets new chapter marks at the interval you selected in the Auto Chapter menu. RTD can reduce PQ slightly since it's a 2nd-gen rewrite of the original recording, but with the 3575/76, I found that to be true only if starting with an analog recording or a low-quality rec mode.

In fact, from my tests, I no longer hesitate to do HQ-to-SP or SP-to-SPP conversions from a great source, like my digital widescreen channels in my analog feed. In fact, a good "strategy" for someone who is mostly a "time-shifter" and values top-quality VIEWING over the occasional DVD copy is to record in 1-hr-HQ, then RTD in 2-hr-SP mode only when necessary. See this post for some amazing results!

However, HSD is the #1 goal for all dubbing cuz it:
1-Makes a lossless, mirror image of the HDD file.
2-Fits more time on a disc than the pg 39 RTD times.
3-Transfers all auto- and custom-set chapter marks to a disc.
4-Doesn't prevent other machine ops so you can watch channels or recordings while dubbing.
5-Heats the laser for a shorter time. (See note at bottom for info on laser power levels/heat.)

Elapsed time for HSD to create an unfinalized DVD depends on rec mode and disc speed. Some tested results:

Disc Speed . . . .Length . . .Mode . . Dub Time (min.)
1-16X -R/+R . . .2:00:46 . . .SLP. . . . 10
1-16X -R/+R . . .2:02:53* . . SP. . . . 34
4X -RW. . . . . . .2:02:53* . . SP. . . . 25
1-2X -RW . . . . .2:02:53* . . SP. . . . 25
2X -RW. . . . . . .1:59:53 . . . SP. . . . 25
1-4X +RW . . . . .1:59:?? . . . SP. . . . 21
4X -RW. . . . . . .1:00:00 . . . HQ. . . . 26.5
*Same title dubbed to diff. disc type/speed. STILL NEED A TIME FOR 8x DISC!

HSD is only available for dubbing from HDD to DVD and only if the total file size doesn't exceed a DVD's 4424 MB capacity. All titles are dubbed at the rec mode setting and aspect ratio in which they were originally recorded, and you can mix titles with diff. rec modes and aspect ratios in the dub list.

So, for HSD, the only limiting factor is disc capacity, and the good news is that HSD can fit more TIME on a std DVD than RTD for the same disc capacity. Below is a chart comparing RTD Time (pg 39 time) vs. HSD Time (time verified by actual HSD test):

Rec Mode...RTD Time...HSD Time*...Tested Filesize/DVD Cap. (MB)
. . .HQ . . . 1:00:00 . . .1:04:55. . . 4419/4424 (couldn't fit 1:05:00)
. . .SP. . . . 2:00:00 . . .2:10:00. . . 4416/4424
. . .SPP . . .2:30:00 . . .2:46:30. . . 4410/4424
. . .LP . . . .3:00:00 . . .3:20:00. . . 4405/4424
. . .EP . . . .4:00:00 . . .4:21:00. . . 4412/4424
. . SLP. . . .6:00:00 . . .4:59:54. . . 3598/4424 (couldn't fit 5:00:00 cuz max. HSD time = <5 hrs)
*Use these times as a target for HDD recording or for cutting a rec down so you can use HSD.

In fact, even the Time Remaining listed in an "Empty Title" on a disc IS FOR REAL-TIME RECORDING OR DUBBING, NOT HSD! You can fill up a disc with MORE time than the Empty Title shows if you HSD. Just add ~8% as a safe number of minutes over the Empty Title time you can add with the listed/selected rec mode... changing rec mode while viewing the Empty Title index pic changes time remaining for each mode.

If your title(s) are all in the same rec mode, you just have to remember the HSD Time for that rec mode to know in advance that you can use HSD. However, if your dub has MIXED rec modes, those times don't apply... you'll have to rely on your math skills or on the rec-mode selection menu to tell you whether you can HSD or not. That menu will add up the total MB of the mixed-rec-mode title(s) and auto-select the highest rec mode possible for your dub.

Rec-Mode Selection Menu


The rec-mode selection menu always shows you how many MB are in your "Dubbing Titles" compared to the empty-disc capacity of 4424 MB (not the "3000 MB" shown above). If your dub is over 4424 MB, the menu will auto-select (highlight) the next lower-quality RTD rec mode and show the new total MB at that rec mode. At that point, you could proceed with the RTD, or you could Back out and do some Scene Deletes to get total file size down to 4424 MB or less so you can use HSD.

I did my HSD Time tests by recording long, then deleting in increments until the Dub Menu showed less than 4424 MB. If you decide to "chip away" some time from one or more of your titles, deleting from the higher-quality rec modes (XP, SP) will make the greatest difference per minute deleted. See this post for how to Delete Scenes and reduce file size.

Rec. time/mode and the goal of always using HSD (for a lossless copy) is prob. the most "difficult" part of the DVDR experience. If you plan to dub several titles to DVD (say, a series), and you really want to use HSD, you have to plan ahead in picking a rec. mode that fits the HSD Time listed above. Also, you need to know if you're going to edit the recorded titles down or leave them at full length.

If you're planning to edit, you need to estimate how much time will be spent on opening network promos, commercials, and ending network promos that you can cut out. Many people have estimated between 42-44 min. per hour... actually, 43 min. per hour is probably a good starting point.

Once you decide to edit down, you can use a better rec. mode than the total time of the original program. For example, if you edit a 3-hour title down to 2:10:00, or 130 min. (43 min/hr x 3 hrs = 129 min.), you can use 2-hr-SP mode for a higher-quality recording, edit down to 130 min. or less, then HSD for a lossless copy to DVD.

If you plan to do NO editing and still want to use HSD, you have to use the rec. mode that covers the entire time of the programs you want on a single DVD. For example, for six 1-hour shows you should record in 6-hr-SLP mode.

Besides the reasons given above for preferring HSD over RTD, there's one more: with RTD, scene deletes play back with an odd stillframe-blackframe-stillframe sequence, which is quite noticeable and distracting during playback. With HSD, those same edit points show as slight, but clean, pauses during playback (created by "disrupting" the inter-related frame transitions created by the original MPEG-2 encoding). However, chapter marks at the edit points can move up to 14 frames during HSD cuz it applies DVD/MPEG rules for chapter mark location and spacing... best to make Scene Deletes in a fade from/to black so they're hidden or less noticeable.

Laser Power Levels and Heat

Heat is the laser diode's enemy, so a good heat-sink design is the first reqmt for laser longevity. Once in your hands, keeping your unit cool is next: give it room to "breath" and away from hot components, and use HSD rather than RTD whenever you can. HSD and RTD use the laser at the same power level while writing to disc, but HSD uses it for a shorter time.

Here's a power-level diagram from a Maxim IC web page on laser diodes that shows how recording uses the highest power and, therefore, heats the laser diode the most. "Bias" power is what we know as "Standby" which is a low level of power to keep the laser ready to write quicker than if it was powered down to "Zero."




wajo

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

DVD Recording, Dubbing, Finalizing/Unfinalizing, Checking, Titling, Auto-Play, Empty Title, Loading, etc.
  1. The reason we can fit only 4424 MB, or 4.4 GB, of info on a "4.7 GB" disc is simply the difference in figuring capacity: disc mfgrs use the decimal numbering system based on 1000, while our DVDRs (and computers) use the binary system based on 1024.
  2. HSD retains ALL chapter marks in the DVD copy (auto- and custom-set). RTD strips those and sets marks only per your auto-chapter setting in the Recording menu.
  3. Be careful with the REC MODE button if just checking the current setting cuz your first press will probably change the rec mode to the next lower-quality one. Better to use the INFO button as described here.
  4. The Video > TV Aspect menu controls the format you view and record on digital channels. See this post for more info on setting TV Aspect and recording widescreen programs.
  5. For recommended DVD brands and speeds and checking them for quality, see this post.
  6. Remember Rule #1 for Hi-Quality Recording: It all depends on the source!
Recording to DVD

You can record to a DVD the same way as you can to the HDD. Select the DVD side before pressing REC or select DVD when setting up a timer program. Just remember the DVD time limits for each rec mode... something you don't have to worry about when rec to the HDD. If a recording goes over the available space on a DVD, the 3575 auto-switches the "overflow" to the HDD.

HOWEVER, I can't think of any good reason to record directly to DVD disc rather than the HDD, even if to save a dubbing step. Consider the real possibility of a bad DVD disc, which causes the recording to fail, or stutter on playback, or ...? Too late! You've got no recourse, no Plan B... you've lost any chance at seeing the show you wanted to record! On the other hand, if you record to the much-more-reliable HDD you can not only watch the show but also dub to your heart's content until you get a good disc that'll play for 100 years... even in your new flux-capacitor-solidstate-neurotransgenerator!

Using DVD-R/+R Discs

DVD-R/+R discs are write-once media, ideal for long-term archiving, assuming you use high-quality media. Until you Finalize, you can:
  1. Add more titles if there's room left, w/o worrying about overwriting anything already on the disc... the machine knows where to start a new recording.
  2. Change title names.
  3. Change the index pic.
  4. Delete titles (altho no space is gained back).
Using DVD-RW/+RW Discs

For temporary offloading, storage, testing or other temp. purposes, you can use DVD-RW and DVD+RW discs. These can be burned and erased many times (up to 1000, according to experts). DVD-RW discs can also be Finalized and Unfinalized at will, which is handy for playing in other machines then reusing them. Use Disc Edit > Erase to delete ALL titles on a DVD-RW or DVD+RW disc, and Disc Edit > Finalize (Unfinalize) on a DVD-RW disc. DVD+RW discs don't need Finalizing and that option is not normally available for these discs.

You can also delete INDIVIDUAL titles and gain their time back if you delete the last title and work forward. If you delete an intermediate title, you'll have ANOTHER "Blank Title" besides the one always at the end, and no time will be gained back. However, if you then delete the title(s) between the two Empty Titles, all remaining time will be consolidated in a single Empty Title in its normal position, at the end.

Unlike DVD-RAM, DVD-RW/+RW discs are playable in virtually any other DVDR. Titles on a -RW/+RW disc can also be overwritten, either partially or completely, as explained on pp 48-49 of the manual.

DVD-RW discs need Formatting, which occurs rautomatically right after Loading a disc for the first time and it takes about the same time as Loading. They also need Finalizing to play in other players/recorders. Once Formatted, they don't need formatting again... they can be erased and reused many times.

DVD+RW discs don't need Formatting or Finalizing, but if you you've done some Chapter editing, you'll have to Make Edits Compatible (as explained on pg 98 of the manual) if you want other players/recorders to show the edit effects. These discs can also be erased and reused many times.

Since these discs have a "phase-changing" burn layer (between burned and virgin states, so to speak), they are not good for long-term storage. Use -R/+R for that.

Finalizing/Unfinalizing

Finalizing adds the disc menu and other info to DVD-R/+R/-RW discs (+RW don't need Finalizing) and makes them read-only... like "Closing" a CD. It then allows any other player or recorder to play them. Before Finalizing, only the machine/model that burns a DVD can read it. FINALIZING IS NOT AUTOMATIC cuz the designers knew you might want to add more titles later.

Finalize is in the Disc Edit menu. The Finalize option will be greyed out and unavailable if there's a timer rec program that might start within 1 hour. That's cuz Finalize COULD take up to 1 hour, depending on how much blank space is on the disc... the more blank space the longer it takes to "close" that space and complete the Finalize op.

You have three options if Finalize is not available: (1) wait till timer rec program ends, or (2) temp. delete the next timer rec program and reset after Finalize, or (3) buy multiple 3575/76's and use one of the other machines like I do!
Don't wait too long to Finalize your discs! Many people create all kinds of discs and don't bother to Finalize them right away. I've read many sorrowful posts about hundreds of unfinalized DVDs now unreadable cuz the DVDR that created them bit the dust! Now, those people are forced to get the old, obsolete unit fixed, or find/buy the same brand/type of unit just to rescue their trapped videos... other brands won't recognize their unfinalized discs!
Unfinalizing, in the Disc Edit menu, is available only for rewriteable -RW discs, which is a big advantage for recording stuff temporarily so it can play in other machines, then be Unfinalized and erased for reuse on other stuff later. Some other DVDRs don't allow this option.

Checking DVD Status

To check the status of DVDs created in the 3575/76... Disc Type, Total Titles, Disc Space Used, Disc Protect OFF/ON, and Finalize Status.. insert the DVD and let it load (~20 sec). There are two ways to see the DVD status screen in the 3575/76 (and other machines as noted in parentheses):
  1. Go to Setup > Disc Edit > Edit Disc Name. A grey screen will appear shortly with the DVD info on it.
  2. From the Disc Menu that shows titles and index pics (Disc Menu button), arrow left from ANY title, read the data screen. Press right arrow to go back to title. (Works on Pio 640 but might not work an ALL other machines.)
If you press OK on a highlighted DVD title in the 3575/76 and it plays, that DVD is Finalized. If you press OK and it just shows a menu with Play/Edit/Overwrite options, that DVD is NOT yet Finalized.

Recording to DVD in Multiple Sessions

DVDs can be recorded to or dubbed with multiple titles in separate sessions. The machine knows where to start its next burn, so don't worry about accidentally overwriting.

In multisession recording (disc remains Unfinalized), you should have no problem if you keep each session on the 3575/76. However, if you try to mix rec sessions between the +VR based 3575/76 and other DVD-Video based DVDRs (Pio, Panny, Tosh, others), the following can occur:
  1. Once you've rec a title to a DVD+R disc in the 3575/76, you CAN rec a title on a DVD-Video DVDR, but your titles rec on the 3575/76 will disappear and their space will be used up! Only the title(s) rec on the DVD-Video DVDR will show and play. Finalizing the disc on the 3575/76 doesn't bring those 3575/76 titles back.
  2. Once you've rec a title to a DVD-R disc in the 3575/76, you CAN'T rec subsequent titles in a DVD-Video DVDR. You'll get a "Can't Record" or similar message. Won't play either until Finalized.
  3. Once you've rec a title to a DVD+R or DVD-R in a DVD-Video DVDR, that disc won't be recognized by the 3575/76 until it's Finalized. Then, of course, it won't be recordable in the 3575/76.

Dubbing a Single Title to DVD - Non-Recommended Method
Note: Not recommended. This method of dubbing doesn't allow as much operator control and visibility as the "Single/Multiple Title" dubbing described next.
  1. Load a blank DVD-R or +R for archiving or giving to others, or a DVD-RW or +RW disc for temporary use and erase (takes ~20 sec). While its loading, ...
  2. If you want a custom title (skip this step if not), press Title button, select HDD title to be dubbed and click OK. Select Edit > Edit Title Name, and enter your custom title.
  3. If in Edit menu, BACK out to the Title menu. If not, open Title menu directly.
  4. Select the title to be dubbed and press OK.
  5. Select the Dubbing option and answer Yes. That title will be dubbed at High speed if all High-speed conditions are met, or a real-time rec mode if not.
  6. Use Disc Edit menu to Finalize the DVD if no more titles are to be added to that disc.
Dubbing Single or Multiple Titles to DVD - Recommended Method
  1. Make sure your dub titles all have custom names that describe the content, as described in this post under "Changing Title Name." Also, since DVDs use the 1st frame of a title for its still frame index pic, make sure the beginning of your title has a "good" 1st frame that identifies the content... if needed, do a "Front-Cut" as described in the same link in the previous sentence.
  2. Load a blank DVD-R or +R for archiving or giving to others, or a DVD-RW or +RW disc for temporary use and erase (takes ~20 sec). While its loading, ...
  3. Option 1, Direct to Menu: While on normal TV pic, press the DIRECT DUBBING button. (Until the disc loads, you'll see the "no-go" symbol in bottom right of screen, indicating the disc isn't loaded yet.)
    Option 2, Using SETUP menu: While on normal TV, press the Setup button, then select Dubbing and press OK. ("Dubbing" will be inactive until the disc loads.)
  4. With HDD > DVD highlighted, press OK.
  5. With Add highlighted, press OK.
  6. In Title Menu, select first title to be dubbed w/arrow keys and press OK, then Add again and repeat process till all desired titles are in dub list. Once in the dub list, titles can be Moved (up or down in order) or Deleted, which does NOT delete the title from the HDD, just from the dub list. Titles don't have to be all the same rec mode or aspect ratio; you can mix them together in a dub list.
  7. Back in dub menu, arrow down to Dubbing Start and press OK. Menu changes to a list of rec. modes available for that title.

    Rec-Mode Selection Menu

  8. If HIGH is highlighted (in white), press OK and answer Yes to dialog. Dubbing will start at High-speed (HS). If TOTAL file size of all titles added is more than disc capacity (4424 MB), the next available rec. mode will be auto-highlighted. Press OK and answer Yes to dialog. Dub will start in real-time (RT), which will take as long as the title runs in hours:minutes.
    NOTE: "High" is the best possible dub mode. It's a lossless transfer and it takes less space on a disc. Elapsed time for a HS dub averages ~30 min. for a 2-hr SP-mode title, depending on rated disc speed. I HS dubbed a 2:02:53 SP title in 35 min. on a 1-16X DVD-R, and 27 min. on both a 1-2X DVD-RW and 4X DVD-RW. "High" is highlighted in all-white, so it's easy to miss that it's actually "selected" cuz you're prob. used to seeing a highlighted box around an item when you select it. See this post for more info on HS dubbing.
  9. To change your mind in Step 8, arrow down to "No" and press OK. One reason to change your mind might be if you decide to edit titles down to lower total file size so the title(s) can be HS-dubbed instead of RT-dubbed?
  10. Once you start a dub, the machine takes over and stops dubbing when the last bit of the original is copied to the other drive... you don't need to babysit a dub. When dubbing is done, a message at bottom of screen advises you to Finalize for playing in other machines. FINALIZING IS NOT AUTOMATIC since you might want to add more titles later. To Finalize, go to Disc Edit menu, select Finalize and follow prompts. Takes ~2 minutes to Finalize 2-hrs of SP video. The less video on the disc, the longer Finalizing will take cuz it has to "close" all the open space, so fill-er-up if you can!
Dubbing to DVD with DIRECT DUBBING Button (One-touch Dubbing)

You can use the DIRECT DUBBING button to copy a single HDD title to DVD. First, add custom title if desired (see Step 1 above). Load a DVD, start the HDD title playing, then press the DIRECT DUBBING button (bottom row, 2nd from right). The HDD title will be copied to DVD from the beginning of the title, no matter where you start the dub during playback. The dub will be made at High-speed if all normal conditions are met for a HS dub (file size must fit and not be over 5 to 5.5 hours, depending on rec. mode).

Dubbing DVD-to-HDD - Unfinalized and Finalized Discs

There are two ways to dub a non copy-protected DVD > HDD, depending on whether the DVD is finalized or not.
  1. Normal Dubbing for Unfinalized DVD. Set desired HDD rec. mode, then follow the first 7 steps above except select DVD > HDD in Step 4, and skip Steps 8-10... they don't apply since the dub can only be in real-time and Finalizing doesn't apply to the HDD.
  2. DIRECT DUBBING for Finalized DVD. Set desired HDD rec. mode. Start a single title playing (does one title at a time), then press the DIRECT DUBBING button (bottom row, 2nd from right). The title playing will be copied to HDD in real-time from the beginning of the title, no matter where you start the dub during playback. Repeat for each title on the disc.
Stopping a Dub

To STOP any dubbing session, press the STOP button on the front of the unit. If you STOP a dub to a -R or +R disc, that disc may be unusable again.

Changing Title Name

To change a Title name on the HDD (recommended) or on an unfinalized DVD if you forgot to change it on the HDD, see the heading "Changing Title Name" in this post.

Auto-Play

The 3575/76 will auto-play most home-made DVDs if you insert the disc in the tray then don't close the tray but, instead, press PLAY. Just closing the disc tray will usually just display disc type/info, then sit there waiting for a command. DVD+Rs are usually better at this auto-play trick than -Rs.

You should try the Insert-Play method on your DVDRs and different disc types to see which ones auto-play for you. If giving discs to others who also like auto-play, use DVD+Rs or just tell them to try the Insert-Play method on their DVDRs... unless they like menus.

Don't know anything about players. (Had to add this after I gave someone this info, then he said it didn't work on his BrandX PLAYER!)

Commercial discs are a mixed bag... some can be auto-played but most only play to an option-selection menu, e.g., "Michael" auto-plays with this method but "Erin Brokovich" doesn't.

"Empty Title"

In DVDRs that use the Philips +VR standard, partially recorded discs will show an "Empty Title" in the Disc Menu. It shows the amount of rec time remaining on the disc at each rec mode (press REC MODE button while viewing the disc title screen). That's called a "Reserved Fragment" and serves a specific technical purpose which no one is interested in... only how to get rid of it!

If the "Empty Title" on a DVD-R/+R bothers you, the only known way to get rid of it is to Overwrite it, then delete it, before Finalizing the disc:
  1. Click OK on the Empty Title on an unfinalized DVD-R/+R.
  2. Select the "Overwrite" option. A red REC dot and Pause symbol show on screen.
  3. Press Pause and let the machine overwrite the Empty Title. It doesn't matter what it records, and recording will stop when it fills up the disc... you can leave and play with the kids! Recorded time and time remaining appear on-screen.
  4. When done recording, select that title and press OK > Edit > Title Delete. Then, don't forget to Finalize the disc with the Disc Edit menu.
DVD-R/+R permanently lose the overwritten space, so there's no "Empty Title" to show anymore. This doesn't work on DVD-RW/+RW cuz they're designed to return deleted-title disc space back to you intact (when deleting from the last title forward)!

DVD "Loading"

Just an FYI: some things go on during the "Loading" process that some people might be interested in knowing.

Blank DVDs have a Power Calibration Area (PCA) near the inner hub. Each time you insert a burnable disc, the DVDR's FW performs a 15-step test to determine the optimum power for writing to that specific DVD disc. It stores results of the power test in a Recording Management Area (RMA). This storage is cumulative. A DVD-R can hold up to 7,088 separate calibration tests, and a DVD+R can hold up to 32,768. If bored, you can read more on this subject in this thread.

Another thing that happens during the Loading process is HDD startup, which takes 16 sec.


wajo

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

Title EDIT/DELETE and Using/Editing CHAPTER MARKS
  1. Don't use Divide on a title BEFORE using Scene Delete. Always make Scene Deletes first, then you can Divide the title. More info below, esp. on HOW TO AVOID DIVIDE ALTOGETHER IN TIMER RECORDING!
  2. Scene Deletes set a "virtual" chapter mark to define where to pass over a deleted section of video during playback or dubbing, and those marks (edit points) can move up to 14 frames if you use high-speed dub (HSD) for a DVD. This is done automatically for compliance with DVD rules as to location and spacing of chapter marks. My experience is that your chosen edit point will actually end up BEHIND the point you selected, so try setting delete points AHEAD of where you actually want them to end up if using HSD... my points seem to move farther behind my cuts as the title progresses (starting at 4 and progressiing to 14 frames towards the end of the title).
Editing Functions

The 3575/76 has a very simple and intuitive editing interface for performing the most important editing tasks most normal people need: deleting, dividing and chaptering. A list of all the editing functions is shown below.

I had a Pioneer DVR-531 before and a DVR-640 now, and since using the 3575 for everything, I've gotten used to its very simple interface and like it as well or better than my Pios for editing. In fact, since I learned how well the 3575/76 transitions between back-to-back timer recordings, I no longer even use the DIVIDE function! That is, for three shows on the same channel, for example, I set individual programs so each show has its own title and can be accessed in any order I want w/o searching thru a 3-hr title, and dub to DVD is already set up title-wise!



HDD Title Menu for Play, Edit and Delete

To do anything with a HDD title (DVD title menu is different), make sure the HDD drive is selected (HDD button, 2nd from left in top row of remote). Press the TITLE button on the remote (2nd button down from top right). Select a title's index pic with the arrow keys.

If you press PLAY with a title selected, it will play from the beginning or, if you've already watched part of it, from the Resume point you left it in.

If you press OK with a title selected, a menu opens with all the ops you can perform on that title, as shown below. The first two options are for PLAYBACK either from the Resume point you left it in before or from its start. This is also where you can EDIT a title or DELETE a single or multiple titles.

  • Select "Edit" and press OK to open a menu with Edit options.
  • Select "Title Delete" and press OK to delete a title, which leads to a couple of confirmation screens you have to answer "Yes" to cuz the deletion can't be reversed... gone forever. If that'll get on your nerves, don't buy either the 3575 or 3576... there's no way to avoid the double Yes's!
  • Select "Delete Mutliple Titles" and press OK. Arrow/select each index pic/title you want to delete and press OK, which adds a trash can in the upper left corner. When all titles you want to delete have a trash can, press the CLEAR button on the remote (2nd button up from bottom left) and answer Yes to the confirmation dialogs.
  • This "Dubbing" option is NOT the main dub menu; this one is for the selected title with no options to change rec modes, and you're only guaranteed High-speed dub if the title meets all reqmts for a HSD (size, etc.). Better to use the Dubbing menu under SETUP for most all your dubs, which gives you more "visibility" and control in the dubbing process.
Changing Title Name

You'll notice that the 3575/76 auto-titles shows on the HDD with a 1st line of text that has date/time/channel/rec mode, and a 2nd line that has date and rec length. The 1st line can be changed by you to something more descriptive of the contents

If you don't change the 1st line, your HDD and DVD titles will include the ORIGINAL rec mode text ("HQ," "SP", etc.) since it's part of the auto-titling function. This might be confusing later if you dub real-time to a different rec mode... the original rec mode text persists thru all dubs unless you change titles with the Edit menu.

The 2nd line of a title, with date and rec length, is permanent so it can't be changed... BUT one AVS member, kalish47, wanted NO DATE on his titles from copied VHS home movies, cuz it would confuse people seeing video from 1980 with a 2008 date in the title, so he pulled the plug on his 3576 for 5 minutes to get a clock that showed --/--/--. Now he has no record date and time on his copied videos, as described here! Obviously, he can't do timer recordings like that, but this is one way to avoid a permanent "recording/copying" date on DVDs with old video watched by easily confused relatives?

To change a title name on the HDD (can also be done on unfinalized disc but "writing to disc" is considerably slower):
  1. Open Title menu and select title with left/right arrow keys, press OK on title > Edit > Edit Title Name. Cursor is over 1st letter in auto-title line at bottom and capital letters are checked. You can have only 30 characters of any type in a title.
  2. To delete an existing title entirely, press CLEAR button and hold. To erase a letter or space midstream, press CLEAR button once over a letter or space, or hold down and erase all letters one at a time as the cursor moves backwards.
  3. Start new title by pressing a number key... like cell-phone texting, see key/character-set chart below. Keep adding letters at right. Cursor auto-moves right as long as there's an open space there. At end of 1st word, right arrow twice to start a new word.

  • Press the zero (0) key to add a space under the cursor and split the text at that point, leaving a blank space or a new letter/number/symbol you enter there.
  • Press the 1 key, while still in title line, to enter any of 29 diff. symbols. That automatically selects the symbol option and places the first symbol at cursor position. Keep pressing 1 to get a specific symbol, then arrow right to add another, if desired (order of symbols is shown above). When done with symbols, press any other number, 2-9, to auto-revert to the previous letter option you were using.
  • Press up arrow to move up to and select a diff. letter/number option.
  • Press OK on a letter/number option, which auto-returns you to the title line. Numbers will add at any cursor position and move text for another number.
  • Press OK when done, with cursor in title line, and answer confirmation questions.
SCENE DELETE, FRONT-CUT -- Deleting Frame 1 to New Beginning Frame
  1. SELECT EDIT > SCENE DELETE... menu has "Start" highlighted and title begins playing.
  2. PRESS REW... use REW only, any speed, title auto-pauses on 1st frame.
  3. PRESS OK... sets Start point and switches menu to "End."
  4. PRESS PLAY... move to and pause on new/desired 1st frame using PLAY/PAUSE-mode buttons.*
  5. ARROW DOWN TO "DELETE."
  6. PRESS OK... and answer Yes to confirmation questions
*In PLAY mode: FF/REW for fast play...NEXT/PREV for Chapter move...SKIP/REPLAY for preset move...PAUSE for frame-stop.
In PAUSE mode: FF/REW for slow play...NEXT/PREV for single-frame move...PLAY to get out of PAUSE mode.
If you need to do a front-cut AFTER a mid- or end-cut, the easiest way to get to the beginning again is to press the BACK button all the way to the Title menu, let the index pic regenerate, then go back in and make the front-cut. You could also use the REPLAY and PREV buttons to get close to the beginning, but they won't auto-pause, so use REW for the last move.
Note: Since a DVD title is a static 1st frame, make sure anything you want to dub to DVD has a "good" 1st frame so you can have a visual ref. for what's in the title, besides the custom title you created (right?), as described above. If needed, do a "Front-Cut" as described below to get an appropriate 1st frame for a title.

You can also CHANGE the index pic on a DVD before it's Finalized: press OK on the title, select Edit, select Index Picture, pause on frame you want as new pic, click OK, BACK out of menu and wait for "writing to disc."
SCENE DELETE, END-CUT -- Deleting from New Last Frame to End of Title
  1. SELECT EDIT > SCENE DELETE... menu has "Start" highlighted and title begins playing.
  2. MOVE TO and pause on new/desired end frame using PLAY/PAUSE-mode buttons.*
  3. PRESS OK... sets Start point and switches menu to "End."
  4. PRESS PLAY... move to last frame of title using PLAY/PAUSE-mode buttons* EXCEPT use FF only, any speed, for last move to end... red progress bar stops on last frame.
  5. ARROW DOWN TO "DELETE"... IGNORE WHAT'S PLAYING ON SCREEN.
  6. PRESS OK... and answer Yes to confirmation questions.
*In PLAY mode: FF/REW for fast play...NEXT/PREV for Chapter move...SKIP/REPLAY for preset move...PAUSE for frame-stop.
In PAUSE mode: FF/REW for slow play...NEXT/PREV for single-frame move...PLAY to get out of PAUSE mode.
After FF ends, you'll notice that the menu selection automatically goes to and starts a Preview, but the red progress bar remains solidly on the end frame. You'll see a few frames at the end and then the beginning of the title, with the frame counter moving. You can watch the Preview, Preview it again, or just IGNORE it... the end cut is so accurate and repeatable, you don't need to wait for an auto-Preview (and don't be confused by seeing the beginning of the title), just arrow down and select "Delete."

SCENE DELETE, MID-CUT -- Deleting a Specific Scene/Commercial from a Title
  1. SELECT EDIT > SCENE DELETE... menu has "Start" highlighted and title begins playing.
  2. MOVE TO and pause on first frame of scene/commercial to be cut using PLAY/PAUSE-mode buttons.*
  3. PRESS OK... sets Start point and switches menu to "End."
  4. PRESS PLAY... move to and pause on last frame of scene/commercial to be cut using PLAY/PAUSE-mode buttons.*
  5. PRESS OK...sets End point and switches menu to "Preview."
  6. PRESS PREVIEW... there's no "undo" option, so if you're trying to be "exact" (see Note below), you can Preview the cut before committing to deletion... it Previews multiple times in a loop. If not what you want, you can go back to Start and End points with up/dn arrow and reset one or both points, then Preview again. If necessary, you can start fresh by pressing BACK once to go back to the edit screen and start over.
  7. ARROW DOWN TO "DELETE."
  8. PRESS OK... and answer Yes to confirmation questions.
*In PLAY mode: FF/REW for fast play...NEXT/PREV for Chapter move...SKIP/REPLAY for preset move...PAUSE for frame-stop.
In PAUSE mode: FF/REW for slow play...NEXT/PREV for single-frame move...PLAY to get out of PAUSE mode.
Using Divide in Conjunction with Scene Deletes

Never use Divide on a title BEFORE using Scene Delete, esp. if your HDD is nearly full... that may cause HDD freezes or other problems. If you need to separate shows in a continuous recording for dubbing to DVD, make SCENE DELETES first (if any). Then, DIVIDE each show and rename them immediately (which you'll want to do for the Disc Menu anyway).

Before dubbing, BACK out to the title menu, let all index pics regenerate to clear the cache and "connect" to their new titles, then dub the 1st show to DVD and delete it from the HDD. THEN, go back in and dub the 2nd show, etc.

How To Avoid DIVIDE Altogether in Timer Recording!

Since the 3575/76 is so good at transitioning from one timer-set program to another, you really NEVER have to record two or more shows appearing on the SAME channel as one continuous program if you'd rather have them in separate titles.

This means NO DIVIDING REQUIRED just to get separate titles!

You can set timer programs back-to-back on the same channel OR on multiple different channels when recording to the HDD and lose only the first 3-sec. of the 2nd, 3rd, etc. programs.

The HDD has a 3-sec. buffer that it has to write to disk (indicated by the chasing lines in the display) and, while it writes that buffer, the 3575/76 is switching to the next timer program (same or other channel) and starts recording immediately. You'll end up with separate titles and 1 extra sec on the lead show, then 3 sec less at the beginning of the next show(s).

If you're a timeshifter and only record/watch/delete, no problem either way.

Setting Auto- and Custom-Chapter Marks
Note: The 3575/76 creates numbered chapters only... no separate index pic or other visual clue that you can use in a top menu, like in a Toshiba. The numbered chapter marks are visible and instantly addressable in the INFO menu, and can also be moved to during playback with the NEXT/PREV toggle button.
Most other units don't allow auto-chapter marking on the HDD, and ONLY custom-set (edited) chapter marks are transferred during high-speed dubbing. However, the 3575/76 is unlike those other DVDRs: (1) it can set auto-chapter marks on the HDD, as well as DVDs, and (2) both auto- and custom-set (edited) chapter marks transfer to DVDs when dubbed at high-speed. A real-time dub uses only the auto-chapter setting you make in the Recording menu, so it strips any auto- or custom-set chapter marks from the HDD original.

The 3575/76 has six settings for Auto Chapter marking, from Off to 60-min. intervals. A chapter mark can also be set manually (Add Chapter), and one is automatically set at every Scene Delete. That can add up to a lot of chapter marks w/o you realizing it!

Editing Titles with Chapter Marks
The following editing comments are based on my research, experience, and testing only.
A problem can occur when you use auto-chapter marking on the HDD and then add more marks with Scene Deletes.... they can "collide" at times and cause freezing during edit and can cause playback oddities. (Pioneer units don't allow marking on the HDD, prob. cuz of the potential problems it can cause if not careful in their use?)

The 3575/76 has a default auto-chapter setting of 10-min. That setting seems to be OK for most timeshifting and light to moderate editing. If you like auto-chapters on the HDD AND regularly do lots of editing, don't change the default to 5-min. interval cuz that is more likely to cause colliding chapter marks if you make lots of Scene Deletes after recording.

One user trying to copy a camera tape ran into a freezing problem, which we suspect was caused by "colliding" chapter marks since he had auto-chapter set for 5-min. and he was adding lots of new chapter marks with Scene Deletes. He tried deleting the chapter marks but still had problems. He solved it by turning auto-chapter OFF before re-copying the tape to the HDD, leaving only his custom-set chapters from editing.

If you run into a freeze or playback problem with a title, check the proximity of chapter marks and see if any appear too close. If some do, you can try deleting close marks at the auto-marked locations (easy to spot since they're on XX:XX:00 positions), leaving just your edited marks. This worked for me once, but like the tape story above, it may not ALWAYS work? You may even want to delete ALL chapter marks if they're not "vital" to you for that title.

Once you get thru with chapter edits, make sure you BACK out of the Edit menus to TV pic, then go back in to try playing or whatever again... this helps clean out the cache (memory) for that title and any errors should be cleared from memory. You may even have to shut down then turn back on for a "complete" memory wipe.

If you have a problem trying to High-speed dub (HSD) a title with lots of chapter marks, be advised that a HSD MOVES edit points/chapter marks up to 14 frames (1/2-sec) cuz it applies MPEG2/DVD rules for location and spacing of chapter marks. This can cause problems in the DVD copy that you won't notice in the HDD original... the chapter mark movement only occurs during the HSD. Although a real-time dub (RTD) is "frame accurate" (preserves the cut point accuracy), it results in an odd still-black-still-frame edit point that's "disconcerting" to the eye.
Technical note from DVD-Lab Instructional Manual: "As you are adding chapters or moving them you will discover you can't always add a chapter to an exact spot you would like. DVD specifications require that each chapter point be on an I-frame which occurs approximately every 15 frames. 15 frames is about 0.5 sec of playback. Therefore, Chapter Points can only be placed on these spots which occur approximately every half-second.

This limitation is often solved in professional practice by encoding the MPEG-2 stream such that - if necessary - extra I-frames will be generated at specific times to allow for accurate placement of Chapter Points (such as a scene change or transition)."
Hint: If you want to delete chapter marks on the HDD, start with the LAST one and the next-to-last mark will ratchet back TO YOU... you won't have to chase each mark down manually, just keep ratching them back to you! (For DVDs, there is an easier "Delete All" command, but the ratchet method on the HDD is very fast!)

To get to the end of a title or near the last chapter mark quickly, use the "Search" function in the INFO menu to go directly to a time near the last chapter mark, as described in the "Search" portion of this post.
Reserving Space on the HDD for Complex Editing

If you do lots of editing, DON'T let your HDD get beyond ~80-90% full or freeze-ups can occur due to file fragmentation and lack of space. The 3575/76's Seagate HDD has only a small (2MB) cache for temp. storage. It's like your computer HDD: it doesn't delete data, it just deletes the "pointers" to the data and keeps editing instructions in a small (2MB) cache and on the HDD. So, it's advisable to clean off the HDD on a regular basis by deleting watched titles ASAP and/or offloading to DVDs.

If your HDD gets "seriously" full and/or you start having HDD editing problems, use the LIFO method of offloading titles (Last In First Out). This will clear space in a nicely ordered fashion that maximizes contiguous free space for new titles and editing instructions.

See this post by a user who let his HDD get full, had persistent editing problems, cleaned up his HDD, and pledged allegiance to KYHCO, "Keep Your HDD Clean Org."

More info here on why you shouldn't let your HDD get full, then do complex editing.


wajo

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

Recording Closed Captions (Analog Only)

Note: This is a work in progress!
Estimated completion date: When hell freezes over!
I'd rather explain the origin of the universe (cuz that's simple)!

The 3575/76 records ANALOG closed captioning (CC) automatically but does not record DIGITAL CC.

ANALOG CC:

Bottom line: As long as you're recording an analog channel, you'll be recording Analog CC by default. It's an integral part of the picture, emcoded in the Vertical Blanking Interval (VBI) between frames of an interlaced TV picture. To see recorded Analog CC on your TV requires only turning CC on in your TV settings (CC1 = English). Summary notes on Analog CC:
  • ON by default.
  • Always records since it's in the unseen part of the picture.
  • Appears on screen while recording.
  • Displays on screen during playback if your TV is set to display CC, which is not a normal TV default setting. Make sure the TV's caption display is ON.
  • CC1 is the normal display channel for English (CC2 or 3 = Spanish?)
  • Can't be seen during playback thru HDMI (any format even 1080i) or Component connection with (or some w/o?) Progressive Scan on. Analog CC is recorded in the unseen space (VBI) between fields of an interlaced pic (2 fields per frame). Switching playback to a progressive mode for Component or sending a digital signal over HDMI (even 1080i) "strips" the CC since they strip the field/frame structure of a basic interlaced signal. One user checked his line outputs with a scope and found no CC passing thru Component outputs with or without Progressive scan on, so some or all(?) DVDRs may not pass CC thru Component regardless of scan type. The analog CC are still in your recordings, but you'll have to use a Composite or S-Video connection, where the signal to the TV will always be interlaced even if Progressive scan is on... a "no-strip" zone, so to speak!
NOTE: Many commercial DVDs have a selectable menu option for turning on "Subtitles" (CC) regardless of your TV/DVDR settings or type of connection. If you want CC "for sure," select a language in the DVD's Subtitles menu; that forces CC to show on screen.

One notable feature of the 3575/76 Zoom is that it maintains text size and position in commercial DVDs when zooming to any ratio: 1.0, 1.2, 1.5, or 2.0X. Using the zoom on virtually all 16:9 TV's enlarges text and sends some of it off-screen.
DIGITAL (DTV) CC:

Bottom line: the 3575/76 SHOWS digital CC thru the tuner if turned on in the Setup menu (Service 1). However, the 3575/76 DOES NOT RECORD digital CC.

Summary notes on DTV CC:
  • OFF by default.
  • Turn it ON by selecting Service 1 in the DTV CC menu.
  • User settings (customizations) for font, background color, etc. are OFF by default. Turn ON if you want special user settings See pp 35-37 of the manual.
  • When ON, shows CC thru tuner if digital CC is embedded in a digital program. You could be seeing ANALOG CC on "digital" channels converted and delivered in an analog feed? (A big, black hole, here!?)
  • Disappears from screen while recording CUZ IT DOES NOT RECORD DIGITAL CC.
CC in General
  • CC won't appear instantly. It takes a few sec for CC to begin displaying on screen.
  • A Second Audio Program (SAP) can be used as an option for CC. Solution: turn on SAP.
  • Subtitles can be used as an option for CC in commercial DVDs/movies, and they will display regardless of any DVDR or TV settings. Solution: turn on Subtitles in your language, usually listed as an option in the DVD menu.
  • "Analog" and "digital" don't equate to interlaced and progressive. Analog signals are "always" broadcast to us in the interlaced scan mode. "Digital" can be broadcast to us in the progressive or interlaced scan mode. Broadcasters usually identify which digital scan mode they're using, usually 720p or 1080i... virtually no one broadcasts in 1080p yet due to the high bandwidth needed to send a 1080p progressive signal, where each 1080 pic has to be fully formed, with no interlaced fields to break it up into smaller chunks, and lower bandwidth, for broadcast.
If you want to learn more about CC, see this Wikipedia entry.

Also, here's a FCC Fact Sheet.


wajo

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

Upconverting, Chase Play, Pause Live TV, Commercial Skip/Replay, and Zoom
Note: Be careful with the STOP button while a normal recording is in progress thru the REC button or a timer program. Pressing the STOP button once will stop the recording!

If you're watching something else during a recording and press the STOP button to stop playback, the playback will stop on Resume and the recording will continue. BUT if you press the STOP button with nothing playing, the recording will stop!
Upconverting

The 3575/76 does not upconvert over Component connection, same as ALL other North American DVDRs. This forces you to use HDMI for upconversion, and HDMI has copy protection (CP) built in. Since they don't make DVDRs with either Component or HDMI imputs, CP stuff is watchable any time you want, but not copyable, just the way "they" want it.

To upconvert to 1080p or other res, you need an HMDI connection. You then "activate" it for first use by pressing the HDMI button on the remote, which starts HDMI at 480p. Each press of the button then changes res to 720p, 1080i and 1080p. If you use any other connection type (composite, S-Video or Component), your TV should handle any upconversion in a normal manner, i.e., should not be a problem at all. In fact, in my system, HDMI at 480p provides a better pic than 1080p on my 47" 1080p LCD.

I just read in another forum that some DVDRs don't upconvert normal TV channels for viewing, only when playing DVDs. The 3575/76 can upconvert both.

On "Expectations": Don't expect upconversion to do anything "magical" with an analog channel received via cable TV... that's a bit-starved Composite signal (all video signals mixed together and compressed), and you can't make a silk purse out of that sow's ear! However, upconverting can make Component signals look better on a good TV, like HD channels from an OTA antenna and from commercial DVDs, which are produced with Component YCbCr video. Even that assumes you've got a good TV and the appropriate DVDR settings for your system.

Chase Play

Chase play allows you to watch a show from its beginning while it's still being recorded on the HDD. The recording needs a 3 sec. head start before you can chase-play it, and you can only chase PLAY to within 3 sec. of the live show.

That 3-sec. is the "buffer" between the data read from the incoming signal and stored in the HDD's cache before it's written to the HDD. Essentially, it's what alllows us to play and record a show at the same time, i.e., the data read and written are at different points in time, but never closer than that 3-sec. buffer cuz that's not been written to the HDD yet.

With a manual or timer recording to the HDD in progress, press PLAY and start watching from the beginning until you catch up to within 3-sec. of the live recording. You don't have to go to the title menu to play since the PLAY-button priority is 1-Whatever's recording, 2-Last title left in Resume position, 3-Last title recorded. This priority persists even after turning the unit off and back on again.
Hint: To see where you are in chase play vs. the live show, press the INFO button and the counter will show your play position on left and the live recording position on right.
While chasing, you can SKIP commercials, FF, etc except the ability for any fast-speed play/skip ends sooner, i.e., it only lets you PLAY when you get ~3-4 min. from the end.

If you have to answer the phone, get a snack or leave temporarily, press STOP once. The pic on the screen will change to the live show at that point in time, and your chase play will be left in a "Resume" position, so when you come back and press PLAY again, the playback picks up where you left off.

This "Resume" function is remembered even when the recording stops and even if you turn the unit off, and it never "times out" like a "Pause Live TV" or similar pause-based function can.

If your chase play catches up to the live show, it auto-stops the playback and switches to the live show... an info message appears on screen. You'll miss the 3-sec buffer between what you watched and what's being recorded.

If you just CAN'T miss that 3-sec of buffer cuz it happens in a crucial part of the show, you can keep chase playing after you get the message by pressing PLAY again. Then, keep playing till the start of the next commercial and press STOP. Now, you'll be live IN A COMMERCIAL and you can watch live from there on!?

When recording stops, the entire program will be on the HDD for watching again, dubbing to DVD, or deleting, and it's previously watched Resume position will be remembered if you didn't watch it all the way thru already.

Be careful, if you press Stop twice, you'll stop both playback AND the recording!

Chase Playing Back-to-Back (BTB) Timer Recordings

I tested a Chase Play of FOUR back-to-back (BTB) timer-recorded shows on different channels (could be on same channels), where the end time of program 1 is the same as the start time of program 2, etc.

If you start Chase Play on Program 1 while it's still recording, it PLAYS THRU THE CHANNEL SWITCH AND START OF RECORDING ON PROGRAM 2... the only "blip" you'll see is the 3-sec buffer write to HDD.

If Program 1 has finished recording and you're into Program 2, 3, etc. and you press PLAY, the show currently recording will start playing., and IT will play seamlessly into the next program IF it's still recording, and the next, etc.

While any subsequent Program is still recording, you can go back to any other program anytime and play it by going to the normal Title menu or the INFO menu (T1, T2, etc.) and selecting it. (Programs must be over 3-4 minutes long or you can't get to the title menu... same thing that prevents FF, SKIP, etc. during last 3-4 minutes of a program being chased.)

Titles that you've chased, even if just the first frame, will NOT show the normal "New" in the Title menu. Titles you haven't chased will be obvious cuz of the "New" indication on the index pic. If using the INFO menu, each title selected to play will play back from first frame, regardless of their Resume position.
Hint: Since you only miss 3 sec. of the 2nd and subsequent shows in a back-to-back series of recordings, people who like ALL their shows to be in separate titles, even those on the same channel, can do this by setting back-to-back recordings rather than one "block" of recording, e.g., 7:00-8:00, 8:00-9:00, 9:00-10:00, tather than 7:00-10:00.
Pause Live TV

The 3575/76 also has a Pause Live TV button that starts making a temporary recording of a live show you're watching so you can come back, while it's still recording, and start playing from the point you paused it. You press the PAUSE LIVE TV button twice (once to start recording, 2nd to pause playback at that point), do your thing, come back, press the button again, and it plays from the point where you left it. An on-screen display, lower left, shows the play status: > for playing, ll for paused.

You can stop Pause Live TV by pressing the STOP button twice (see Note above). Recording will also stop when/if the disc runs out of space, the total time exceeds 12 hours (not 6 as in one national review), or 2-minutes before a timer recording is scheduled to start.

If you plan to be away for awhile or not sure, instead of Pause Live TV, you can press REC several times, in 30-minute increments, until you've set the remaining time for the show you're watching. Using the Rec button gives you two options:

1. If you're still there while it's recording, you can start Chase Playing immediately from where you pressed REC... just press PLAY... without worrying about time limits and the temporary nature of the Pause Live TV function.

2. If you can't make it back in time and the remaining show completes recording per the time you set, the portion you missed will have been recorded to the HDD so you can play it back whenever you do have time.

Commercial Skip/Replay

The 3575/76 has a Skip and Replay toggle button on the remote for skipping fwd or going back to replay in increments you can set. The default Skip and Replay amounts are 30 sec. You can set the Skip/Replay amounts in the Setup > General Settings > Playback menu. Click on Variable Skip / Replay and select one of five options from 5 sec to 5 minutes for each skip (fwd/replay). Then, just press the Skip or Replay button to skip fwd or go back the amount of time you set.

I use 1-minute Skip and 30-second Replay, which seems to work fine... 3 presses to skip past the "normal" 3-minutes of commercials works pretty good. I've tried to get my wife to change to 3-minutes fwd so it's one click, but no dice so far... she really doesn't like me meddling with HER 3575... the other two are mine to mess with!

Zoom

The 3575/76 has four zoom level for playback of widescreen movies with cinema aspect ratios that include letterbox bars top and bottom: 1.0X, 1.2X, 1.5X, and 2.0X.

These zoom ratios are accessed thru the INFO button where you arrow right to the +/- icon, wait 1 sec or press OK to bring up the zoom options. Arrow down to a zoom option and press OK. That displays an open box over the pic that defines approx. what area of the pic it will zoom to. You can move the box with the arrow keys, if desired. Press OK again and the pic zooms in.

The 1.2X zoom box might display with a small portion of the top and bottom bars not deleted, but when you press OK to accept that zoom, the zoomed pic will not retain any of the bars.

To go back to normal view, press the INFO button again, which auto-selects 1.0X, so press OK again. Also, if you Stop playback and resume later, the pic will be back to normal view.

One notable feature of the 3575/76 Zoom is that it maintains embedded CC/subtitles in commercial DVDs in the same location on screen and in the same size text. Using my 16:9 LCD TV's zoom enlarges the text and sends some off-screen.


wajo

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

Recording Fast-Action Sports, Racing, etc.
  1. Recording sports is a PITA!
    And it's not the 3575/76, it's the %#&@ networks that don't bring their best stuff to the game... HD cameras, HD feed, etc. So far, only ESPN-HD is worth a shitzu!
  2. Be careful with the REC MODE button if just checking the current setting cuz your first press will probably change the rec mode to the next lower-quality one. Better to use the INFO button as described here.
  3. Be careful with the STOP button while a normal recording is in progress thru the REC button or a timer program. Pressing the STOP button once will stop the recording! If you're watching something else from the HDD or a DVD during a recording and press the STOP button to stop playback, the playback will stop on Resume and the recording will continue. BUT, if you press the STOP button a 2nd time, the recording will also stop! Actually, pressing STOP twice serves no useful purpose!!!
  4. The Video > TV Aspect menu controls the format you view and record on digital channels. See this post for more info on setting TV Aspect and recording widescreen programs.
  5. Remember Rule #1 for Hi-Quality Recording: It all depends on the source, esp. for sports.
Fast Movement and MPEG-2

One of the biggest PQ tests for any DVDR recording is a football game that you want to end up on a DVD. Obviously, if you just want to record, watch and delete, you can use 1-hr-HQ mode and get outstanding PQ. But, it's another story if you want to record at a longer mode, like 3-hr-LP, so you can HS copy to a DVD.

The problem comes from the length of the game, the varying quality of the camera equipment (SD/HD), the broadcast method (analog/cable/HD), and the many long shots of the big field of view, with little 1" men moving unpredictably in different directions. Basketball, baseball, boxing, etc. have larger people with closer cameras for most of the action, so they look good at almost any rec. mode. Car racing is a piece of cake!

MPEG-2, the compression standard for encoding our HDD and DVD recordings (detailed info here), is predictive in nature and does an excellent job in capturing predictable motion by relatively large, distinctive objects, but the football men are so small (actually, small moving objects on big, mostly stationary background) that MPEG-2 doesn't see a need to boost bit-rate for better PQ.

I've done lots of tests trying to understand MPEG-2 as we see it. I've used my Pio 640 to review various recorded video with its bit-rate meter on screen and watching for specific Mbps changes.

In these tests, I found that movement, by itself, is NOT difficult for MPEG-2 to capture with good resolution; where MPEG-2 has to work hard is in big scene changes. Large spikes in bit rate occur consistently at drastic scene changes, like from the CU of a face to a car explosion. Dark to light is not a special problem, but many scene changes can go from 4 to 10 Mbps, depending on the complexity of the change.

I recorded a NASCAR race in 2-hr-SP mode (normal bit rate: 5 Mbps), and the cars racing around the track kept the bit-rate meter almost constant around 2.5 Mbps on shots from all cameras (in-car and outside static and panning/tracking cameras)... even on long shots of cars moving fast around the track with out-of-focus background, with stands and people coming into view suddenly, as well as closeups of the cars racing by a stationary wall camera (doesn't get much faster than the zip-zip of cars moving by). This is where I first realized that predictable movement by relatively large objects is no problem at all for a good MPEG-2 encoder.

One Way to Record a Complete Football Game with Good PQ
Update 2/4/08: I looked forward to the Super Bowl game on Fox Sunday, figuring they'd bring their best cameras and use their normal 720p broadcast feed. Turned on the TV to their analog channel first and saw what looked like a bad-tape-replay. But no, it was the live game, and all other analog channels looked better. Switched to Fox digital channel and it was a little better, but long shots still not same high quality as I saw the week before from same channel broadcasting Idol in HD... only the on-field close-ups looked good enough to record. Tried short segments and even 2-hr-SP looked only as good as a VCR tape in same mode... would have needed HHHHHHQ mode! Not sure if the problem was in the original Fox broadcast or in my analog cable system feed. I've rec NFL football on ESPN HD in 3-hr-LP mode with great results!

Update 2/17/08: NBA All-Star game on my favorite digital channel, TNT-HD. Oh, boy! Here's going to be a great test of LP. NOT! Seems the only network I can trust to bring the "right stuff" is ESPN-HD!
I recorded a "prime-time" NFL game at 3-hr-LP on ESPN digital HD channel (downrezzed in my analog cable feed). The long shots showed some evidence of hairy edges, but the mid-range and closeup shots from sideline, goalpost and booth cameras were very good!

I set a timer rec. for 7:30-10:30 to cover the scheduled show time, but the 3-hr program missed the last 2:33 of the game (ran over).

When I went to dub, my 3-hr-LP football game, it showed 3966 MB at HIGH speed with disc space at 4424. That means you could fill up the extra MB at the same 3-hr-LP rate with another 13-20 minutes and still have a HS-dubbable game.

So, to cover everything but "sudden death," you could set the timer for 3:30:00 and rec mode for LP, then cut just 10 min. or so of the fluff at beginning and end. (See procedure here.) The ESPN game had 9 min. of pre-game fluff...kickoff didn't start until 9:30 on the record clock...so it should be easy to get down to the 3:13:00-3:20:00 limit just by cutting a couple of commercials.

Who knows, some severe cutting might get you down to the 2:10:00 max. SP on a DVD using high-speed dub!? If you can get there by editing, next time record in the higher-quality 2-hr-SP mode!?

Anyway, with my Philips 3575 setup, 3-hr-LP works good for sports with national interest (e.g., Pro) on a digital channel when the crew uses HD cameras. Doesn't work as good for sports with mostly regional interest (e.g., college) on a SD analog channel shot with any equipment... these will be pretty obvious by the softer edges and "grainy" pic when viewed up close to your TV. Basically, 3-hr-LP might not be "acceptable" for a non-Pro/non-prime-time sports broadcast, or even simulcast, on an SD channel.

One example: I was going to rec an ABC NFL MNF pre-season game being broadcast only on an SD channel, but aborted it when I saw the live pic... the field shots looked like "previously recorded" tape while the booth shots were their normal brilliance. I did a short rec test and, needless to say, the game portion rec. at 3-hr-LP looked pretty bad since it was awful to start with... players standing still had "hairy edges." I'm thinking the game was either a tape replay, or they used SD cameras for the game and HD cameras for booth shots cuz the announcers looked great!?


wajo

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

Manual, Timed and Timer Recording from Tuner, Set-Top Box, DVR, VCR or Camera
See the Note in the "Copying/Recording from External Devices..." section below for a Hint on copying copy-protected commercial VCR tapes to the HDD and dubbing to DVD.
Recording Basics

For recording, the 3575/76 uses only the most useful rec modes (1, 2, 2.5, 3, 4 and 6 hours)...no 13-hour mode like on my Pio 640, which is totally useless...and very ugly!

The 3575/76 uses some "different" time lengths for it's longer rec. modes compared to some other DVDRs, so make sure your "conversations" with users of other brands are talking the same language. Many other DVDRs use the same names for LP/EP/SLP, but they are 4/6/8-hr modes compared to the 3575/76's 3/4/6-hr modes. Because of this, I always include the full name with hours just to be clear for people with the same rec. mode names but different lengths.

The best all-around rec. mode is 2-hr-SP. There is virtually no visible difference between the 2-hr-SP and the 1-hr-HQ modes, and 2-hr-SP will always fit that show/title on a std DVD. 3-hr-LP, 4-hr-EP and 6-hr-SLP modes are also good if your source is a digital HD channel (even if downrezzed to SD!)... not so great for most typical SD analog channels.

However, 1-hr-HQ will retain PQ much better in multi-generational dubbing... amazingly well if the original recording is from a digital WS channel, as described here.

The 3575/76's 160 GB HDD will hold up to 66 hours at the most-used 2-hr-SP rec. mode, and up to 198 hours at 6-hr-SLP mode. Things you rec to the HDD are auto-added to a Title list (2nd button down, top right). They appear with date/time/channel/mode/length and a full-motion video/audio index pic.

The 3575/76 can also record on DVD-R, +R, -RW and +RW discs.

You select the default rec. mode for both HDD and DVDs with the REC MODE button on the remote, bottom left. (See Note 3 below.) That mode will be used for all your recordings unless you change it. Once you change it with that button, all future recordings will use that new mode...make sure you change it back after a special recording with a different mode. Timer modes are set separately and only for that specific timer program... they don't change the default mode.

The one thing the 3575/76 doesn't do that I wish it did (like my Pio 640) is put a title on a recorded show, or at least allow you to title your Timer Programs. The 3575/76 only shows the date/time/channel/rec. mode in two lines. The top line is the one you change when you do a "Change Title" from the Edit menu; the bottom line remains as the originally recorded date and title length.

Manually Recording a TV Channel

See Note 6 below for info on recording widescreen programs.

Select HDD or DVD depending on which you want to record to. DVDs can take 10-20 sec. to fully load and be ready for recording. Set 3575/76 tuner on channel you want to record, set the rec. mode (if other than your default), and press the REC button on the remote or front of the unit ("RECORD"). If you just let it record from there, it will continue recording until you stop it or the 12-hour recording limit is reached.
CAUTION: When you start a manual recording, don't Stop that recording until the HDD Rec icon disappears from screen, about 6 sec. If you Stop a manual rec with the icon on screen, that title can "freeze" so it can't be deleted with the normal Title Delete menu. If that happens, use the SETUP > HHD Menu > Delete All Titles menu. If you have other titles you DON'T want to delete, use the Title Edit > Protect option to prevent deletion of each title you want to preserve, then use the Delete All Titles option in the HDD Menu.
Be careful with STOP button while recording... see Note 4 below.

Recording with the Manual Timer

If you know how long a show is going to be, you can press the REC button repeatedly and the rec. time will increase in 30-min. increments, up to 6 hours total. This way, you can leave and the 3575/76 will stop recording after the set time has run out.

Be careful with STOP button while recording... see Note 4 below.

Auto-Recording with a Timer Program
  • Be careful with STOP button while recording... see Note 4 below.
  • See Note 6 below for info on recording widescreen programs.
  • At times, the unit might not shut off after a timer rec. No known cause, but might be from Auto-Clock search for PBS time signal?
  • If you have a power failure, make sure you haven't lost the clock display in front panel. If not there and no little red clock icon, you've lost timer rec programs. Need to reset them.
You can set one of 36 timer programs for recording once or regularly while you're in Poughkeepsie visiting Granny or just off doing something else... like earning a living. The 3575/76 can be on or off when a timer program is scheduled to start. A timer rec program that's recording will be in red at the top of the Timer Programming list. If necessary, you can change a timer rec END time while it's recording. The 3575/76 shuts off when finished with a timer rec program (most times, rarely it won't). You can also STOP a timer recording with one press of the Stop button.

To set up a timer program, press the TIMER button on the remote (bottom-left, 2nd button) and press OK on the highlighted "New Program." Enter approp. info. in the 6 simple boxes: Date, Start, End, CH, REC To, and Mode. Arrow right/left to move between boxes and enter the appropriate info:



Date box has current date. To get a one-time, future program in the Date box, arrow up to go to a specific date. To get a repeating program (daily/weekly) in the box, arrow down to select one of the options.

Start box has current time. Set hour with arrow up/dn or enter numbers with keypad. Arrow right and set minutes same way. Arrow right and set AM/PM with arrow up/dn.

End box has dashes (- - :- -). Set same way as Start time.

CH box has 2 sections:
First is for source: --- (analog tuner), DTV (digital tuner), E1, E2, etc. Arrow up/down to change.
Then, arrow right to select the channel number (blank if source is E1 or other ext. input). Use arrow up/down keys to make channel changes or enter numbers directly with the remote.

REC TO box ALWAYS has HDD as default, so you can leave it or change it to DVD with the arrow keys.

Mode box has whatever you last set as default via the REC MODE button on the remote while viewing TV, so you can leave it or change it with the arrow keys for that timer program. Changing the rec. mode here is just for that timer program and doesn't affect your default setting.

Timer Recording BACK-TO-BACK Programs

You can set timer programs back-to-back on multiple different channels when recording to the HDD and lose only the first 3-sec. of succeeding shows for multiple analog channels, and 5-7 sec if a digital channel is involved (cuz they take slightly longer to tune).

For successive programs on ANALOG channels, the HDD has a 3-sec. buffer that it has to write to disk (indicated by the chasing lines in the display) while the 3575/76 is switching to the other channel. Since analog channels tune quickly, it can start recording the next different channel immediately.

For successive programs on DIGITAL channels, or if switching from/to a digital channel, it has to wait until the digital channel tunes or until the tuner switches from digital to analog, so the rec might miss from 5-7 sec of back-to-back programs involving digital channels.

In either case, you'll end up with separate titles and 1 extra sec on the lead show, then 3-7 sec less on the following shows, depending on if a digital channel was involved.

This ALSO means you don't have to record two or more shows appearing on the SAME channel as one continuous program. This way you can have each show as an independent title and you WON'T HAVE TO DIVIDE the shows later for dubbing to DVD. If, however, you're a timeshifter and only record/watch/delete, no problem either way.

Recording from a Set-Top Box (STB)

See Note 6 below for info on recording widescreen programs.

You can record a channel from a cable box or sat receiver (STB) via a line connection between the STB and the 3575/76.

When you want to record a cable-scrambled or satellite-encrypted channel while you're not there, you have to set a timer program in the 3575 to record from whichever external input your STB is connected to (E1 on back). You then set an ON or REMINDER timer in the STB (hopefully, your STB has one with similar name) so it turns on and tunes the channel you want to record at the designated start time.

If you're there, you can tune the STB to the desired channel manually, select the source (E1) with the Source button (top left), set the rec. mode (if diff. from your default), and press REC on the 3575/76 at the program start time. Pressing REC repeatedly increases REC time in 30-min. increments (up to 6 hours) if you want to set a specific rec. time so you don't have to be there at the end of the program to stop the 3575/76 recording.

Recording from the STB will tie up both tuners so you'll only be able to watch the recording or something else from the 3575/76's HDD or a DVD... remember, it's a multi-tasking wonder!

Be careful with STOP button while recording... see Note 4 below.

Copying/Recording from External Devices Using Std Analog Cables

See Note 6 below for info on recording widescreen programs.

You can copy/record non-copy-protected stuff from virtually any external device that has std RCA-type video and audio outputs (Composite Y/W/R RCA) or S-Video that you can connect to the 3575/76's AV inputs (E1 on back or E2 on front. All copying will be in real-time... there is no high-speed copying from external components by common earthlings. (See Note below for copying commercial movie tapes to the HDD, etc.)

Select the HDD drive, set the rec. mode, select the appropriate input with the Source button (E1 or E2), start the DVR/VCR/camera playing, then press the REC button. The 3575/76 will record until you shut it off with the STOP button.

If you don't want to "babysit" a copy, you can press the REC button repeatedly until the necessary amount of recording time shows in the front panel display. You could also set a timer rec. program for the length of the original and press PLAY once the timer program starts. (You can either learn the length of a VCR or camera tape by FF thru the original and noting its running time, or set a time for 30-min. past the estimated tape run time and delete the excess on the HDD later.)

One user with very bright tapes used a clever workaround to change brightness as he recorded to the 3575/76's HDD: he set a Panny DMR-ES10, which has multiple darkness-control settings, in the path from his VCR to the 3575/76's line input.
Note on copying commercial VCR videotapes to the HDD:

Based on another user's experience where he successfully copied a copy-protected (CP) movie to his 3575 using a 10-yr-old VCR, I got out MY 10-yr-old VCR and successfully copied 8 of 13 commercial movies and dubbed them in High-speed to DVDs. I used the front RCA connection (E2) and the copies turned out great all the way thru to DVDs... no video disruption or audio/video loss or blackout.

In doing this, I ran into a situation that could easily affect others who might try to copy old movies or anything from an external source: if you just played a DVD or dubbed to DVD, the 3575/76 doesn't auto-shift back to the HDD when you then want to copy something to the HDD EVEN IF THE UNIT IS TURNED OFF THEN ON AGAIN!

If you don't switch back to the HDD, pressing the REC button with an empty DVD drive selected will yield no response at all, and you might think the 3575/76 won't let you record that movie.

So, make sure you've selected the proper recording drive, HDD or DVD, before starting a copy from an external source!
Copying/Recording from DV Camera Using Firewire

To copy from a DV camera using firewire, connect a 4-pin DV (firewire) cable from the camera to the front DV connection (E3). Select the HDD drive, set the rec. mode with REC MODE button on the remote (bottom left), and select input E3 with the Source button on the remote (top left).

If you want to control your DV camera and the 3575 recording function with the 3575/76 remote, press the INFO button and continue with Steps 3-6 on pp 54-55 of the manual.

If your DV recording is in widescreen (WS) 16:9 mode, make sure your Video > TV Aspect is set to 16:9 Wide. Actually, you should leave the 3575/76 set for 16:9 Wide for virtually all your recordings even if you don't have a 16:9 TV now cuz you WILL have one someday and you don't want your WS recordings "forever" squished by letterbox bars... I guarantee you'll be pi**ed off if that happens!
Note: All Panasonic digital Palmcorders have a "Cinema Mode" for shooting, which produces a WS pic. Other cameras prob. have a similar setting for WS. Make sure you've set the recording for the proper aspect, as well as the 3575/76 for proper aspect when copying. PQ in your copy on the 3575/76 HDD can be significantly affected if you have mismatched aspec settings. All this depends on your current TV and, more importantly, your FUTURE TV, which by all odds will be 16:9 widescreen aspect.

One 3575/76 user had a good idea but never reported actual results: he thought he could connect his camera to the firewire input, then feed video THRU THE CAMERA from another device (computer, STB, DVR) that the firewire (E3) connection wouldn't normally accept, and record to the HDD that way. Sounds like a brilliant idea and can't see why it wouldn't work?
One user reported that a widescreen DV camera recording copied to the 3575/76 in correct 16:9 aspect thru the DV input (E3).

Be careful with STOP button while recording... see Note 4 below.

Note 1: DON'T let your HDD get beyond ~90% full or operational problems can occur due to file fragmentation and/or lack of space for file management info. Clean off the HDD on a regular basis by deleting watched titles ASAP and/or offloading to DVDs. See this post for a little more info.

Note 2: Remember Rule #1 for Hi-Quality Recording: It all depends on the source!
The source determines how good a recording you'll get at any rec mode. Whenever possible, record from a digital HD channel, where you can use 3-hr-LP mode for James Bond action movies and even 6-hr-SLP on TV dramas and get amazing quality for that supposedly low-quality rec mode. Analog channels will give you a good recording at HQ and SP modes, but not nearly as good at the longer rec modes. And copying a $1 DVD made in Ho Chi Min City will probably just contaminate the recording mechanism with large communist cooties!

Note 3: Be careful with the REC MODE button if just checking the current setting cuz your first press will probably change the rec mode to the next lower-quality one. Better to use the INFO button as described here.

Note 4: Be careful with the STOP button while a normal recording is in progress thru the REC button or a timer program. Pressing the STOP button once will stop the recording! If you're watching something else from the HDD or a DVD during a recording and press the STOP button to stop playback, the playback will stop on Resume and the recording will continue. BUT, if you press the STOP button a 2nd time, the recording will also stop! Actually, pressing STOP twice serves no useful purpose!!!

Note 5: If recording on the HDD (manual or timer), the LED light will shine as long as the HDD drive is selected on the remote. If you accidentally pressed the DVD button or just played a DVD and don't press the HDD button to re-select the HDD, the LED light won't shine. If concerned, press the HDD button during a HDD recording to check status... the light should shine and the counter should be moving.

Note 6: The Video > TV Aspect menu controls the format you view and record on digital channels. See this post for more info on setting TV Aspect and recording widescreen programs.

wajo

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

Channel Scanning with Auto and Manual Channel Preset
  1. The manual has two incorrect statements (pp 28-29): only analog channels can be added, and deleted digital channels can't be recovered. BOTH ARE WRONG! The "secret" is you have to FIRST do an Auto Channel Preset > Cable (Analog/Digital) and let it at least START on the digital channels. You can cancel with the BACK button anywhere in the digital channel scan (like on 1.1 or a frozen channel), then you can enter digital channels with a Manual Channel Preset anytime after that. You can also delete and recover channels. I often do both in testing units with previous channel memory and NO channel memory (new, out-of-box state).
  2. If you lose digital-channel tuning, you should re-scan at least once since cablecos are playing a "shell game" with their QAM channels as networks struggle with the all-digital transition. Here's a great explanation of one "typical" cableco's QAM channel situation as experienced by Budget_HT...how channels get assigned and changed regularly by the cablecos.
  3. Approx. 40% of 3575 users subscribed to basic ANALOG cable might have a problem holding the tuning of digital channels due to "analog interference" with cable QAM tuner... a hdwe fix is required. People using an OTA antenna, subscribed to DIGITAL cable, or using satellite should not have the same digital tuning problem. See this post for more info on this problem.
The 3575 has two tuners: NTSC tuner for analog OTA and cable channels, and ATSC/QAM tuner for digital OTA channels and QAM (Quadrature Amplitude Modulation) digital channels from cable TV. Here's a good, short explanation of QAM as used in TVs and DVDRs. The 3575/76 can't tune satellite channels directly.

The only way over-the-air (OTA) and cable subscribers will know what channels the 3575 can receive/tune by itself, without a set-top box (STB), is to place it 1st in line on the incoming coax and do a scan, or Auto Channel Preset (Analog/Digital).

Even if you subscribe to "basic" or "extended" cable, do the Analog/Digital scan cuz you might be surprised at how many digital channels you can receive with the 3575/76's digital tuner. Cablecos normally have local digital channels and some others "in-the-clear" (not scrambled) in the channel range your 3575/76 can tune. They also have higher-numbered channels only their STB can tune but they may be "remapping" or "mirroring" some of those high-numbered channels to lower numbers your 3575/76 can receive.

Doing an Initial Auto Channel Preset (Scan) for Channels

To do an auto-preset, go to the Setup > General Setting > Channel > Auto Channel Preset menu and select either the OTA or the Cable (Analog/Digital) option, depending on how you receive your TV signal. Cable subscribers should select Analog/Digital even if they only subscribe to analog cable service... there are usually some digital channels in the analog feed that the 3575/76 can tune, and many will be downrezzed SD versions of an HD channel (with brilliant PQ that might hurt your eyes... be careful!).

Let it auto-preset for its 125 analog channels (~2 min.) and 135 digital channels (~20 min.). Analog channels will tune quickly and you'll see them on the TV as they scan in, but digital channels can take up to 10 sec each to scan and they don't appear on the TV during the scan.

Some users have run into cableco-related problems during auto-scanning with their 3575/76 1st on the coax, as recommended:
  1. One user couldn't get ANY digital channels... cuz there were none. He found his extra-cost "digital tier" were being converted to pure ANALOG. (See this post for cabelcos cheating subscribers this way.)
  2. Another user had a 3-sec delay in receiving TVG info for her cable box. She called and the cableco said their signal was "not getting to the box" apparently from the 3575/76 passthru blocking the return path? She had to set up with splitter or by line connection to the box like a satellite user.
Recovering from a Frozen Digital Channel Scan
See this post FIRST for a new, simple way to stop a scan on a frozen channel w/o losing the channels already scanned in. Try it and, if it doesn't work for you, come back and try the "old" method described here.
If your auto-scan freezes on a digital channel, remember the offending channel number. First try stopping the scan with the Setup button; screen should eventually go blue. Switch to analog tuner. If that doesn't stop the scan, pull the power cord. Replace the screw on coax with a push-on type so you can remove it quickly during the next scan.

Turn unit on and do another Auto Channel Preset. Just before the scan reaches the bad digital channel, pull the coax and let the scan complete w/o the coax.

Turn 3575/76 back on and go to next section on "Hidden" Digital Channels and follow the same Manual Channel Preset procedure to find other digital channels that either didn't auto-scan or are "hidden" behind a Scrambled XX.1 channel.

Using Manual Channel Preset for Tuning "Problem" or "Hidden" Digital Channels
Note: If you have a TV with digital tuner, you'll probably see different channel numbering for digital channels than on the 3575/76. The reason is explained in Wikipedia in this paragraph:

"As the QAM tuner in this case is an adaptation of existing ATSC-compatible hardware, the television set's channel numbering will follow ATSC-like conventions. If what appears as 'channel 300' on the cable company's package receivers is physically on frequencies corresponding to an analogue cable converter's "channel 77", an ATSC-compatible digital-cable ready TV will most likely display this as 'channel 77-300'."
If you see channels in your digital TV that the 3575/76 didn't tune with an Auto Channel Preset or you have a problem digital channel, you can find/test them with the Manual Channel Preset menu. If not, skip this entire subject. In fact, my unit no longer works the way I described below, so it appears to be a "problem" or incompatibility with the signal my cableco sends rather than anything in my 3575.

For example, here are the cable channels my LCD TV gets compared to the same channels my 3575 picked up with my initial auto-scan:

Net.........TV CH.....3575 CH
CW21.......60-703...60.1
Fox6HD.....60-706...60.2
My68........60-711...60.3
DiscHD......75-10....75.1
ESPNHD.....76-1......76.1
TNTHD......78-300...78.1

Comparing my 3575 channels with my LCD TV, I noticed that the major channel numbers matched up, but then I found these TV channels my auto-scan apparently missed:

TBS.........83-205
ESPN2HD..83-754

Wondering what's going on, I decided to directly enter major channel 83 on the DIGITAL tuner, hoping there was something in the 3575's tuner at ch. 83. The 3575 tried to tune 83.1, but after ~10 sec, it showed "Scrambled" then blue screen... entered 83.2 and got the same... entered 83.3 and it tuned in after ~10 sec! It was the same network/station as my TV's 83-205.

Apparently, the 3575/76 can skip an entire digital channel group if the first major channel, XX.1, is Scrambled, at least with my cableco... other cablecos map digital channels differently (as described later). This does make some sense since we know it wil delete an entire group by deleting any channel in that group.

With my new, tunable channel 83.3 on screen, I brought up the Manual Channel Preset menu, which allows you to add a major channel number, like 83, and it will tune all available subchannels in that group. Since I was already tuned to 83.3 when I opened the Manual menu, Ch. 83 was already in the Ch. box. I used the arrow key and OK button to switch the checkmark from "Delete" to "Add" and waited for it to "take" (~10 sec)... don't get impatient! This added the entire group of 83.X channels (83.1, 83.2, 83.3, 83.4). Even my scrambled channels 83.1 and 83.2 were "tunable" as "Scramble Program."
Note: At times, while you're in the Manual Channel Preset menu, the unit might not allow you to enter a channel number (I think if the XX.1 channel is scrambled), so exit the menu, tune the channel directly with the number and .dot key, like 83.3, then go back to the Manual Channel Preset menu. It should now show 83 as being already tuned or at least tunable so you can Add it.
I pressed the BACK button to activate my manual channel additions.

To verify that ALL my tunable channels were added, I pressed the Setup button to get back to normal TV and used the channel up/dn button. 83.1 and 83.2 tuned but showed as "Scramble Program" (which stayed on screen this time, as if they were tuned), and then 83.3 and 83.4 tuned in normally.

In the 3575/76, you can't Delete one specific minor channel in a group without deleting the entire group. You'll have to accept them all and just go thru them with channel up/dn or enter the tunable channels directly. Of course, timer programs are not affected since they use a specific channel number. (My TV tuner allows me to delete individual channels, by the way.)

NOTE: Some people get their 3575/76 digital QAM channels in slots that DO NOT match their TV's major channel numbers. Those systems will likely scan ALL tunable digital channels even if they're "hidden" in a major channel group. One user has TV channel 11.1 which maps to his 3575's channel 77.2 and his scan picks it up OK even tho 77.1 is "Scrambled."

The message is, just look for missing channels in the 3575/76 if you can (compare to TV channels) and try to add them manually. For some, the hard part might be knowing which major channel the 3575/76 maps to... in my case, major channels matched up, but for some others, they may not.

There is a possibility that, if you know or can find out that some OTA digital channels are on XX.1, those should be in your 3575/76 channel lineup "somewhere." That is, there might be some relationship between primary digital channels (XX.1) and how the 3575/76 maps those to its 135 ATSC/QAM tuner channels.

Cable "ON-DEMAND" Channels

One 3575/76 user found that, in the evening, he was able to tune his cableco's free (non-scrambled) "On-Demand" channels cuz his neighbors were watching them, and another user says he can tune ALL his cableco's on-demand channels cuz they're not scrambled.

These probably won't be memorized in a typical channel scan since they might only be "ON" when a neighbor tunes them in, so you may have to know which channels they appear on and just enter the channel number WHEN APPROPRIATE.
WARNING: Best not to enter On-Demand channels in your 3575/76 channel memory if you have children who might tune them in when you're not there. They often have adult content and it might be best for people with children to only tune those channels with the number buttons when and IF they want to see what's on when kids aren't around!

In addition, content can change in the middle of watching, so don't assume any of your free "neighborhood" channels are safe for kids!
Of course, IF you are seeing those channels only cuz your neighbors are tuning them in, YOUR On-Demand channel watching will be under their control so, if they decide to go to bed in the middle of an interesting movie, you'll have to imagine the ending... or call your neighbors and complain that you weren't thru with their movie!

Music Channels

You'll probably also have some music channels (audio only w/still pics) that you might want to get rid of with the Manual Channel Preset menu. I get 51 of these and I don't care enough to have them in the channel memory cuz I don't want to channel up/dn thru them! Delete the XX.1 music channel and they'll all be deleted... I think this also works if you delete ANY of the music channels in a group, e.g., 64.7 deletes all 64.XX channels?

Quote:
Note: "Switched Digital Video" Being Rolled Out by Cablecos

In the 2nd half of 2007, Comcast Cable started rolling out Switched Digital Video (SDV) which delivers digital channels only ON DEMAND from a subscriber. You have to have "equipment in the home" (their box?) to communicate with the "Optical Node" that delivers the channels in your neighborhood (500-2000 subscribers per node). According to people on this forum, the cablecos won't SDV ALL their channels, so just be aware of this emerging trend in case some of your perfectly tuned digital channels go away suddenly. If they do, call your cableco and see what's up!

wajo

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

Settings for Clock, S-Video Input, TV Aspect, Progressive Scan, Disc Audio, and HDMI

Setting Your Clock

The 3575/76 has defaut clock settings for Auto Clock and DST ON (Mar/Nov). These should work for people IF CONNECTED TO AN INCOMING COAX (OTA or Cable). The Auto Clock senses a time signal from PBS at noon and midnight thru the coax connection, but only when it's off... at times, I've seen the unit turn on briefly at noon and midnight for a clock check.

The manual says on initial setup you should turn the unit off and wait for the PBS signal to set the clock, but most people are too anxious to try their new "toy," as I was, so I recommend you just set the clock manually on initial setup to keep things going. If you also enter your local PBS channel in the "Manual" clock setting (3rd option), that should speed the process of finding and applying the PBS signal since the unit doesn't have to search all channels, starting with the channel you last left it on when you turned it off.

IF CONNECTED TO A SATELLITE FEED VIA LINE INPUT ONLY, you should set the clock manually (1st option in the Clock menu) and turn Auto Clock and DST OFF. Your unit will search for time signals and not find them, which can cause time and timing problems.

On occasion, even the default settings can fail or cause a problem cuz they depend on a reliable time signal from PBS. MY PBS GOES OFF AIR SUNDAY NIGHT TILL MONDAY A.M. so, duh!, my units search and can't find. I believe an unreliable or nonexistent time signal can "confuse" the 3575/76 and affect timer programs, etc. So, if you notice time problems with the default settings, turn Auto Clock and DST OFF and set your clock manually, same as for Sat subscribers.

I USED TO run my clocks manually at all times cuz I've had lots of bad experience with PBS-supplied signals, not all their fault, but I also know how they operate (unmanned stations in ~40 states) and how their ops are funded (not good like a commercial network selling ads, that's for sure).

However, the clock only has a 30-sec backup to retain clock and timer rec programs when set manually. I found I could be w/o power for ~2 minutes if I used an Auto Clock setting.

One Reason to NOT Set Your Clock!

One clever Mamber, kalish47, wanted NO DATE on his titles from copied VHS home movies, cuz it would confuse people seeing video from 1980 with a 2008 date in the title, so he pulled the plug on his 3576 for 5 minutes to get a clock that showed --/--/--. Now he has no record date and time on his copied videos, as described here!

Obviously, he can't do timer recordings like that, but this is one way to avoid a permanent "recording/copying" date on DVDs with old video watched by easily confused relatives?

Setting for Video Input (S-Video or Composite)

If you use S-Video (Separate-Video) as an input from a STB, VCR, DVD player or other device to E1 on the back of the 3575/76, make sure you set the SETUP > VIDEO > VIDEO INPUT to S-Video.

You can connect both Composite and S-Video to E1 for two sources, like a DVD player and a VCR, and switch between the menu options in Setup > Video > Video Input. Use audio Y-cables (Wal-Mart) to connect the dual L/R audio outputs (2L+2R) from the components to the single L/R audio inputs of the 3575/76. This is ideal for someone who doesn't want cables connected in front, but has a VCR for occasional copying of VHS tapes. Only drawback is remembering to change the setting.

Setting TV Aspect

The 3575/76's "TV Aspect" setting controls the format of the pic you'll see AND record on digital channels... it gives you a WYSIWYG view of the pic you'll be recording. The setting does not affect analog 4:3 channels but it can be used to play commercial widescreen movies on a 4:3 TV if the movie has the widescreen flag... they'll have a notation on the case such as "Enhanced for Widescreen" or "Anamorphic Widescreen."

You should set your 3575/76 for 16:9 Wide in the Video > TV Aspect menu to make sure most of your recordings will play well on all TV types. See this post for more info on setting TV Aspect and recording widescreen programs.

Setting for Progressive Scan

On the 3575/76, only the Component connection is affected by the Progressive Scan setting, no matter what type of TV you have. If you use Composite or S-Video, they can only send 480i and will ignore the Progressive setting. Same for HDMI since it sends specific rez/scan formats under a separate control (HDMI button).

The default setting for Progressive Scan is OFF. If you use the Component connection to an OLDER, NON-PROGRESSIVE TV, leave the setting OFF. If you have one of the newer flat panels, which are *all* fixed-pixel and progressive scan, go into the Video > Progressive Scan menu and set it ON. There will be two confirmation dialogs to answer before it lets you switch to ON, just to make sure your TV is compatible.

The 3575/76 allows you to set Progressive from ON to OFF easily by playing something from HDD or DVD, then pressing and holding the SETUP button for more than 6 sec (ignore the "no-can-do" circle). However, you have to use the menu to set Progressive back to ON.
Note: If you're like some people and run BOTH Component and HDMI outputs simultaneously, each to a diff. TV, make sure you turn Progressive Scan ON for the Component output if you also send a Progressive format thru the HDMI output (480p/720p/1080p). Since your Component output can only send 480p, you might be best served to at least try setting HDMI at 480p as well... the unit will be dealing with only one output format for simultaneous output.
Setting for Disc Audio

If you use one of the Digital Audio outputs (coax or optical), make sure your Playback > Disc Audio > Dolby Digital is set for the default "Stream." This setting ONLY affects playback of discs with DD5.1 or other audio beyond DD2.0, which is the audio all home recordings will have, i.e., this setting will have no effect on normal TV watching or playback of HDD or home-DVD titles since they're all recorded with DD2.0.

While playing a commercial DVD, you can see the types of audio available by pressing the Audio button on the remote, 2nd row 3rd from left. Use arrow and OK keys to make a change to a diff. language or audio type, as desired. You can also use the 2nd icon (the speaker) in the INFO menu to view and change audio options.

Special Settings for HDMI
"Activate" your HDMI connection: When you first use HDMI, you should press the HDMI button on the remote (top left, 2nd button down). This "activates" the HDMI output and sets it at 480p. Sequential presses of that button switch output to 720p, 1080i and 1080p. You can press quickly, or even hold the button down, you don't have to wait till the pic appears for each output. Whatever output you leave the unit in when turning off, that's the output it'll start up on.

The HDMI output is displayed briefly on the front panel of the 3575/76, till the TV syncs up with the format/rez. Your TV should also display which format/rez it's receiving in one of its Display screens. You should go thru all four settings and see which one produces the best PQ in your system. If your TV doesn't support one of the outputs, it'll be skipped. Generally, your TV's scaler will do a better job at upconverting to its native res than ANY current DVDR.
HDMI cable carries both video and audio. The 3575/76 has a default Setup option to use the HDMI cable for audio, but you can turn that off if you use a separate audio connection to a AV receiver... and you don't mind having to turn your receiver on for audio EVERY TIME you use the HDMI connection.

If you have to convert your HDMI to DVI, use an adapter, but remember that DVI only carries video, no audio.

I have my HDMI connection to my 47" 1080p and 37" 768p Vizio LCDs set with:

HDMI Output = 480p
2nd button down from top left of remote, format shows BRIEFLY in 3575/76's display (till channel tunes fully) and in the display of most TVs. The most common "expert" advice is, if you have to upscale, do it only ONCE cuz every upscale loses some quality. Since today's flat-panel displays are "fixed-pixel," they upscale/downscale EVERYTHING to their native (and "fixed") rez. And some of today's computer/video flat panels have "non-video" computer rez like 768p, so they'll ALWAYS have to upscale or downscale to fit that native rez. So, following their advice, don't upscale in the 3575/76 AND in your TV, just send it the "native" rez of the 3575/76: 480i, which HDMI converts (but doesn't upscale) to 480p automatically.

My LCD TV definitely does a better job at upconverting to its native 1080p when I send 480p rather than one of the upscaled rez. Others with a Component signal (OTA and Sat) may get better upconvert results, but generally, TV scalers do a better job than ANY DVDR. Hence, 480p might be better for others to at least try and compare?

Format = YCbCr
RGB Range = Normal (doesn't matter for YCbCr but greatly affects RGB setting)

Try both RGB and YCbCr*... VERY system-dependent. YCbCr is digital Component video and RGB is YPbPr analog Component video. RGB/Normal are the default settings. The 3575/76 reverts to the RGB Format setting if you set for YCbCr and your TV is NOT compatible with YCbCr. The Normal/Enhanced RGB Range setting does NOT revert, so check this if you have dark/light pic problems.

These settings appear to be VERY important and can be greatly affected by the picture settings in your HDTV, with their most noticeable effect on live digital channels and recordings and on DVD playback. They can only be set properly for YOUR system if you take the time to test the settings with all sources, even commercial DVDs, which are produced with digital YCbCr video so they might look different than live TV. Obviously, the goal is to set your 3575/76 so it looks as close as possible to the pic your TV produces thru its tuner cuz you like that pic, right!?

Record a dark scene, on a digital channel only, or play a dark scene in a DVD, then PLAY/PAUSE to see the result. Press STOP, change settings, press PLAY/PAUSE thru the same section of the rec. to see the difference.

I've been back-and-forth on these settings with MY system but, after MANY tests, I've decided it looks best with YCbCr Format (where the RGB Range setting doesn't matter). My 47" Vizio 1080p LCD TV is YCbCr compliant, and I get a noticeably sharper (more contrasty) pic with YCbCr.

With RGB Format, if I set RGB Range to Normal, it produces my overall brightest pic but with reduced sharpness. When I set RGB Range to Enhanced, I get a little sharper pic, but it also gets darker. (RGB/Enhanced might be good for someone who has a pic that's a little too bright, or someone who wants max. sharpness and doesn't see or care too much about a few dark scenes.)

The effect of the RGB Range setting can be subtle on the menu pic but can make a BIG diff. when watching digital channels on the TV or DVDs with dark scenes! So, DON'T THINK THE RGB RANGE SETTING DOESN'T MAKE MUCH DIFFERENCE JUST CUZ THE MENU DOESN'T CHANGE MUCH! ANd make sure you're using the HDMI input on your TV when making Range setting changes. Make sure you watch some live digital channels and DVDs with the Range setting both ways.

Here's a post on some tests I did that might provide a little more info on settings for dark pic.

You can tell if your TV is YCbCr compatible by (1) selecting your TV's HDMI input (vital 1st step), (2) setting your 3575/76 for HDMI Format = YCbCr, then (3) changing the setting for RGB Range between Normal and Enhanced.

If there is a subtle change in menu pic, your TV is NOT YCbCr compatible and the 3575/76 is auto-converting to RGB. This brings the RGB Range setting into play.

When changing HDMI Format to YCbCr, there *might* be a visible change/blip in TV pic if the TV is YCbCR compatible, but there won't be ANY noticeable change in the darkness/contrast when you do step (3) above: change the RGB Range between Normal and Enhanced. (There ALSO won't be any change if you've selected any TV input other than HDMI!) If no change in menu pic darkness/contrast, and you're seeing the TV's HDMI connection, you're set for YCbCr, if that's what works best in your system.

If your TV also has a setting for YCbCr, try setting that on and off for all sources (DVD, HDD, tuner) cuz leaving that off might get a better overall result... most, if not all, TVs should auto-convert to YCbCr when they receive a YCbCr signal from the 3575/76.

HDMI Audio = ON
The default setting. We have two "odd" audio connections to our AV receiver: a digital coax for DD3.1 from DVDs, and L/R audio cables from my LCD TV's L/R audio outputs for normal TV/HDD watching. We have our AV surround system with all 6 speakers up front and learned that the Surround speakers, normally behind you, should NOT be in front or the audio will sound "wrong" due to the nature of the surround speaker system. We also got an "echo" from our TV, so we'd have to turn TV audio off, but still the sound seemed "wrong." When we disconnected those Surround speakers, we got nice 3.1 audio w/o any echo from the TV speakers, so we could leave TV audio on. When we play DVDs w/DD5.1, we select the receiver's DVD input. For normal TV/HDD watching, we use our Composite connection, but when we want amplified audio, we switch to the receiver's TV input and control audio with one remote: the TV's.

RGB Range = Normal
For RGB output only, no effect if on YCbCr Format. The Enhanced option changes contrast (some say black level) and can make pic look better or worse than the Normal option, so you'll have to try both to be sure... but only if you use RGB Format. RGB and Enhanced made my pic on a digital channel a little sharper (added contrast) but made dark scenes a little darker, so best to try all combinations of these settings as described under "Format" above.


wajo

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

Digital Channels in an Analog Cable Feed

I'm on "basic" analog cable (not "extended basic"), which would normally give me (and everyone else) only 47 channels thru my analog tuner. However, with the 3575/76's digital tuner, I also receive, as a free bonus, 8 of the 9 HD QAM channels in my cableco's extra-cost lineup. The HD channels broadcast in natural 16:9 widescreen either all the time or for special shows, like "Idol" and premium sports events.

We've been recording "Bones" and "House" in 2-hr-SP mode on Fox from our basic analog cable service, and the PQ was good with both our 3575 and our Pio 640 before that.

For this week's shows, we changed the 3575's timer rec. to Fox's digital channel for the first time cuz we noticed the shows looked so much better on that channel. We also had our first chance to watch those timer-recorded shows on our new 47" 1080P LCD TV.

When we sat down to watch the shows, my wife said something dainty like, "WOW, what a beautiful picture!" and I said something like "Holy sh**, will you look at that fr**** picture!" Of course, we were used to watching the shows on an "old" analog channel. The digital version is like our good, clear, SD-analog-channel on steroids!

Sort of reinforces the obvious: a high-quality recording starts with the source! That's proven true every time I've recorded a pro football game on an ESPN digital HD channel (only network consistently using HD equipment from camera to microwave uplink), even tho it's downrezzed to SD in my basic analog cable feed... no comparison to a game on an analog channel.
Recent experience: our cable has been giving us a terrible pic on the basic analog channels, but the so-called "digital" channels in my feed are still perfect! Another advantage to having the ATSC/QAM tuner!
When Digital Channels May Really Be Analog!

I was playing with some of the TV's controls and noticed that, when on any of my 8 digital channels, I couldn't turn on Digital CC, only Analog CC... WTH... I know some or all of those channels have CC (ESPN HD, TNT, Fox, Discovery, etc.), and they're on "digital" channels!?

Got me to thinking...maybe I'm not really getting true digital channels, just some cableco converted analog version of an original digital broadcast or microwave feed?

In researching a little, I found a possible answer from Lauren Weinstein's Blog (lauren.vortex. com) in an article titled "Are You Being Cheated by Digital Cable?" A telling section hit home, when she said this:

"The TiVo HD has easily accessible diagnostic modes which clearly spill all the beans relating to these issues. Here in the West Valley (Los Angeles) system of Time Warner Cable, I can clearly see that, at the moment, virtually all basic cable channels in the digital tiers that have simulcast analog (under channel 100) equivalents, are actually being delivered as analog channels, at least to my cableCARDs."

Hey, I'm on TW cable and ALL my digital channels have an equivalent analog channel under 100! This might explain why I can't set Digital CC...I'm not getting digital channels, just a digital>analog version delivered in a TW-specified "digital" channel slot?

Anyway, I do know the shows on my digital channels all view and record in 16:9 aspect and in much higher quality than shows on my analog channels, so they must start out as high-quality, HD digital (most have "HD" as part of channel name) and just get repackaged by the cableco as Lauren indicates in her article.

I've never seen ANY of the "artifacts" that some people see and complain about, only some occasional macroblocks. Since digital is broadcast in macroblocks, with instructions for reassembly, I figure those short "blips" will be normal for awhile, at least until the cablecos get their digital act together by or after 2009... and maybe stop compressing the macroblocks so much... one can hope, anyway.


wajo

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

Basic System Connections
  1. MAKE SURE ALL EQUIPMENT IS OFF when making cable connections, esp. if going by FEEL... static electricity... duh! In fact, the Philips manual recommends UNPLUGGING the units while connecting since your TV, 3575/76, etc. still have standby power when OFF.
  2. If you have an old TV with ONLY an RF/coax connector (no line inputs), you can use an RF modulator to run cables thru, as shown on pg 16 of the manual and as described here. You can also use a VCR as the modulator, as described here. With the VCR, you can rec one channel while watching another.
  3. Some systems might require a high-quality, 2-way digital splitter on the incoming feed... check for 5-1000MHz bandwidth and physical markings that show -3.7dB loss on each output port... if you have (1) ON-DEMAND, PPV or other service that requires you to order shows via the coax, (2) a VCR or VCR/DVD combo that has to record channels separately, (3) your STB doesn't work correctly with an amplified splitter on the coax like the 3575/76's coax passthru. DON'T place a VCR/DVD combo on the coax chain AHEAD of the 3575/76 cuz it passes the incoming signal thru while it's off but "modulates" it for ch. 3/4 when it's on (unless it has a specific setting for turning in off). More info on VCRs and cameras below.
  4. If you use an OTA antenna AND satellite service, connect antenna per 1st sketch and satellite per 2nd sketch. You can't have both OTA antenna and cable service connected cuz you can only scan for antenna OR cable channels, and one scan overwrites another in channel memory.
  5. When done connecting, see this post for some info on settings, and this post for how to scan for channels.
Connections for Cable or OTA Antenna... This is NOT for Dish or DirecTV Satellite


Note: See "How to Set Up a More Complex System" below for methods of connecting multiple components to E1 on the back.
The coax IN/OUT loop on the 3575/76, or any DVDR, is different than the one on your old VCR: it does NOT send any internal stuff to your TV (menus, channels, HDD, DVD). It feeds the tuner and passes the raw signal thru to downstream components, EVEN IF THE SIGNAL IS HDTV. It's a built-in, amplified splitter.

The 3575/76 is unique in that it has an active coax input, meaning the signal is amplified slightly thru the coax to the tuner and to downstream components (STB and TV) as long as the 3575/76 is plugged in... it doesn't have to be on for this OR for watching TV normally. (More info here on active and passive passthru.)

Your first connection should be the incoming coax from antenna or cable on the TOP coax connector on the back of the 3575/76 (ANTENNA IN). Continue the coax from the bottom connector (ANTENNA OUT) to your STB (if any) and your TV (see sketch above). If you have a tunerless TV, it won't have an antenna connection, so you'll use just the line connection described next.

To see internal 3575/76 stuff, you need a line connection (composite Y/W/R RCA, S-Video, Component, and/or HDMI) from the 3575/76 to the TV (see sketch above)... all outputs are active at the same time. S-Video and Component need L/R (white/red) RCA audio cables also. You then select that line input on your TV to see internal 3575/76 stuff.

With each component on the passthru coax chain, you end up with separate tuners and the ability to record one channel while watching another... or two others with a STB and a TV with PIP! ... after you scan for channels, of course, see Note 5 above for a link.

If you have a cable STB (w/ or w/o DVR), you may have some or all unscrambled channels, but you won't know for sure until you scan for channels with the 3575/76, so it needs to be 1st in line so the raw incoming signal is not "blocked" by the STB.

For recording channels only the STB/DVR can tune, connect S-Video+L/R audio cables (recommended) or Composite/RCA Y/W/R RCA cables from a box output to the 3575/76's AV IN (E1) connectors on the back. Only one E1 input on the back can be active at a time. Composite is the default in the Video > Video Input menu ("Video In") so, if you use S-Video, make sure you select "S-Video In" in that menu. For another option, see the "More Complex Setup" info/heading below.

Even if ALL your channels are scrambled or you don't intend on recording thru the 3575/76's tuner, you should install the 3575/76 1st in line for the incoming coax just for the boost in signal strength its amplified passthru will give to downstream components... you might just get "a new TV." See this post for example of boost thru coax. See this post for example of boost thru line input (E1).

If you use pay-per-view (PPV) or other "on-demand" service from your STB that costs extra, and you order that service thru the coax, not a separate tel. line, the 3575/76 will prob. block the return path to the provider, so you'll have to use a high-quality digital splitter rather than the coax passthru described above.

Some people with certain STBs will get a poorer pic or none at all when putting their 3575 1st on the coax. The channels the 3575/76 can tune should be clear and high-quality. If you don't see that, you might have to connect the incoming coax to a high-quality NON-amplified digital splitter, with one output to the STB and one to the 3575/76.

If you have time/timer problems NOT related to a power failure (~30-sec backup), set your clock manually (1st option in Clock menu) and turn Auto Clock and DST off (2nd and 3rd options).

Connections for Satellite Service or a Cable STB with Tunerless DVDR


Note: See "How to Set Up a More Complex System" below for methods of connecting multiple components to E1 on the back.
Satellite broadcasts are proprietary and require a sat receiver (STB) for tuning, so NO DVDR can tune a satellite signal. The only 3575/76 connection a sat user will need is an S-Video+L/R audio (recommended) or Composite Y/W/R RCA between the sat STB and the AV IN (E1) on the back of the 3575/76.

This setup also applies to anyone with a tunerless DVDR... you're relying on a Sat or cable STB to tune all your channels.

Only one E1 input on the back can be active at a time. Composite is the default in the Video > Video Input menu ("Video In") so, if you use S-Video, make sure you select "S-Video In" in that menu. For another option, see the "More Complex Setup" info/heading below.

When you want to record something thru the Sat receiver, check your Sat manual cuz some STBs require you to set the STB's output to 480i (DirecTV HR10) and some don't (HR20 and 21) cuz they auto-downconvert the signal via analog output. Can't be any more specific, just things I've read.

If you have only satellite service, no OTA antenna also connected (could even be rabbit ears), your 3575/76 will not be able to get its normal time signal at noon and midnight to maintain an auto-clock setting. This might cause clock and timer scheduling problems. If you have time/timer problems NOT related to a power failure (~30-sec backup), you might have to set your clock manually (1st option in Clock menu) and turn Auto Clock and DST OFF (2nd and 3rd options).

Since you're using a line input for recording, your digital Component signal gets re-combined into an analog composite or S-Video signal, with the expected reduction in PQ, just as "Hollywood" wants it to be.
Note: Nana B has Dish Sat service and connects to her 3576 with a coax cable from the receiver's TV ANT OUT, then coax from the 3576 to the TV. This is the lowest-quality and least "versatile" connection type but it provides a very simple connection scheme for her. She gets her local channels thru an OTA antenna connected to a separate VCR, but the antenna could just as well be connected to the coax in (ANT IN) on the 3575/76. If you can continue the coax from the 3575/76 to the TV, then you could watch OTA channels w/o turning the 3575/76 on. Then, scan for channels and you'll have the best of both worlds: satellite plus OTA channels, tuned and viewed thru separate components.
How to Set Up a More Complex System

Someone who just can't stand cables connected in front, but wants to record from two external components, like a VCR and DVD player, can connect both Composite video (Yellow RCA) AND S-Video to E1 on the back. For audio, use two RCA Y-cables (available at Wal-Mart etc.) to connect the audio outputs of each device (White/White and Red/Red) to the single audio inputs (W/R) on E1. (Might have to turn only one source on at a time if you get audio interference?)

To record from each source, switch between the menu options in Setup > Video > Video Input. If you make one the "default" input, like S-Video for everyday recordings, then switch to Composite only when you want to copy a VHS tape, the odds of having the wrong input set for everyday recording FROM THE EXTERNAL INPUT are reduced... recording thru the tuner isn't affected by this setting.

For MANY external components, here's a diagram showing how Member Charles_I used Switchers to set up his 3576 with a cable STB and six other components: 3 VCRs, 1 DVD player, 1 laser disc, and 1 stereo amplifier.
Note: the 2nd Switcher (before the TV) could also be an AV receiver with four I/O, which would eliminate the Stereo Amp.


Connecting to Your TV - Matching to Your Source

As stated above, you need to connect cable(s) from the 3575/76 to your TV to see anything internal, like menus, tuner channels, HDD or DVD. You can use Composite (Y/W/R RCA), S-Video+L/R Audio (W/R RCA), Component (R/G/B+L/R Audio) or HDMI. Once connected, you select that TV input to see stuff from the 3575/76.

But, which type of cable should you use? That's something only you can ultimately decide, but I think you should start with a TV connection that best matches the type of signal your 3575/76 receives:
Cable = Composite.
OTA = Composite (analog) and Component (digital/HD).
Satellite = Composite or S-Video matching the cable type you use from your receiver to E1 on the 3575/76... S-Video is usually best.

For your tests, you can use QVC shopping channel for PQ comparisons of live TV since they have static shots, studio lighting, and text always on screen.

I'm on cable TV so my signal is delivered as Composite. To preserve that signal intact to my TV, I use DIGITAL Composite/AV cables (mfg to digital stds, better construction & tighter tolerances than analog cable), RCA DT or DH9AV from Wal-Mart ($17).

Most, if not all, of today's TVs have a comb filter and/or other circuitry designed to separate the video components from a Composite signal with minimal PQ loss, so why do it BEFORE it gets to that circuitry? By sending my composite signal to the TV unchanged, it goes thru only ONE component separation, in the TV, just before display... and experts say separating video components from a composite signal ALWAYS loses some PQ. This gives me MY best pic for watching my many timeshift recordings thru the 3575/76... I don't watch TV channels thru my 3575's.

I also have HDMI connected for watching commercial DVDs, which are produced with digital Component video (YCbCr). See this post for some info on HDMI settings.

If using an old std CRT TV that has only Ant/RF and one or two composite/S-Video connections, use your remote to select "Video" or "DVD" or similar button to switch from a TV channel to the TV's input from the 3575/76. AND DON'T PLACE YOUR 3575/76 TOO CLOSE TO THAT CRT... electromagnetic interference (EMI) from the pic tube could cause lot of "wonky" problems, including playback stuttering, lockups, and false copy protection (CP) messages with failure to record from that.
Note: Several people have complained about a "dark pic" from their 3575 when using HDMI. One person reported the same via all analog outputs (just tuner-related, all ext. inputs were OK). See "P3" heading here.
Connecting VCR or Camera to 3575/76 for Copying

To copy your VHS home movies to DVD, connect S-Video+L/R audio cables from a VCR output to S-Video IN on the back of the 3575/76 (E1), if a STB or sat receiver is not already hooked up there. You can use Composite Y/W/R RCA cables, but the quality might be quite as good... I can't see any difference.

Only one E1 input on the back can be active at a time. Composite is the default in the Video > Video Input menu ("Video In") so, if you use S-Video, make sure you select "S-Video In" in that menu. If E1 on the back is already occupied or you want greater convenience in temporary setup like this, connect composite RCA (Y/W/R) to the Video/Audio inputs on the front of the 3575/76 (E2). You can also connect a DV camera with DV/firewire cable to E3 on the front of the 3575/76.

Since I do tape transfers only occasionally, I leave composite cables bundled up next to the 3575/76 for quick front connection. Also, connecting to E2/E3 leaves your back connection (E1) open for other, more-permanent components, such as a sat or cable box/DVR.

Use a SMALL Wrench to Snug-Up Connector Nuts

On every connection that has a nut to tighten, use a SMALL wrench to add just a LITTLE extra tightening at the end. Especially important on all splitter connections.

I use a small, 7/16" open-end wrench. Don't use a large wrench, pliers or any FORCE at all...just a final snug-up with finger tips on wrench.

I had interference once that was caused by an RF/coax input line that I finger-tightened, but I moved the DVDR several times for tests, etc., and it had come loose only about 1/100 of a turn...just enough to cause interference ("scratchiness") in my picture.

Where to Buy Cables

For online cable purchase, Monoprice and Blue Jeans Cable, both sponsors of the AVS Forums, make excellent cable. (Click their ad at top. Both sell good HDMI cables that cost much less than most others... lots of happy customers!) In all your cable purchases, make sure they say they're for "digital" use since they should have better construction and tighter tolerances, required for digital systems.

I bought my digital-quality composite cables from Wal-Mart for ~$17, RCA DH9AV or DT9AV. I also bought an expensive ($32) Philips HDMI cable from Wal-Mart but wish I'd bought the std 28AWG HDMI cable from Monoprice (~$3-4 ea.) cuz everyone raves about them AND they have ferrite cores (the large cylinders just behind the end fittings) to reduce interference. Here's a 6-ft HDMI cable but they have other lengths. Someone else used a $0.99 cable with ferrite cores and said he got the best pic from it, even better than the same $32 Philips cable from Wal-Mart! I looked high and low locally for ANY HDMI cable with ferrite cores and couldn't find any.


wajo

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

Picture Quality (PQ) for Watching, Recording and Copying
  1. Some people have reported a "dark" picture on their smaller LCDs that use a computer-based (non-video) resolution of 1366x768, usually advertised as "720p." However, their manuals usually show "720p (768p)" in the actual specs.
  2. Remember Rule #1 for Hi-Quality Viewing and Recording: It all depends on the source! The 3575/76 can't beautify a "pretty bad" (actually TERRIBLE) signal like SD Dish or some crappy analog channels.
PQ Consensus by Users and National Reviews?

There have been several users and national reviewers who tested the 3575 for PQ using display-alignment tools, i.e., discs originally designed for aligning a display/TV (the only thing that CAN be aligned) with its upstream video components using standard test patterns. (I did that often in my video lab.) The following 11/5/07 ZDNet review by Matthew Moskovciak seems to summarize this best:

"We were pleasantly surprised with the introduction to Star Trek: Insurrection, as it demonstrated that it does have 2:3 pull-down by correctly rendering the curved edges of the bridge railings and boat hulls. We moved onto the difficult opening sequence of Seabiscuit, and again the DVDR3575H handled it much better than the test patterns on HQV. So while it struggled with the difficult video-based tests of the HQV suite, the DVDR3575H performed better with actual film-based program material."

My personal consensus: If you're looking for a DVDR to watch test patterns, and you refuse to realign your display (with your DISPLAY-alignment tool, duh!) to accommodate the 3575/76, you should consider another unit. However, if you want a multi-tasking DVDR to reliably record actual moving pictures, the 3575/76 is an excellent choice... and very simple to use (esp. good for all "technically challenged" members of your family)!

PQ for Watching TV thru the Tuner

I'm on "basic" analog cable (not "extended basic"), which would normally give me only 47 channels thru my analog tuner. However, with my 3575's digital tuner, I also receive, as a free bonus, 8 of the 9 HD QAM channels in my cableco's extra-cost lineup. The HD channels broadcast in natural 16:9 widescreen. I have a 47" 1080p Vizio GV47L LCD as my main TV-watching unit. I also have a Pioneer DVR-640H and a Panasonic VCR/DVD player combo.

The 3575/76's PQ thru the tuner is good for SD analog channels but OUTSTANDING for digital channels....even tho I'm getting a downrezzed and downconverted 480i SD analog-cable feed of those channels.

I've been a lifelong viewer of standard analog TV channels, so my first look at a digital channel was STARTLING! The best illustration of this difference occurred just the other day. I walked by my 1080p LCD on my way to the kitchen to get my hourly snack and, from ~2 feet away, the pic from my 3575 showed every flaw in the analog pic on screen at that time... you don't want to be too close to a 1080p display, leads to great dismay!

Anyway, when I returned I asked my wife to switch my 3575 to my favorite digital channel, TNT HD, and at the same ~2 feet away, the pic was sharp and clean... actually, "brilliant" is the way I like to describe it... and that's thru DIGITAL Composite cables to the TV!

I tried all four types of cable connections on my 3575 and found that MY system works best by preserving my cable's Composite feed all the way to the TV with DIGITAL Composite/AV cables (mfg to digital stds, better construction & tighter tolerances than analog cable).

If you can afford the $$$ and the time, you should also try ALL the TV connection types possible in your system.

We really don't use our 3575s to watch LIVE TV on a regular basis tho since we've got new LCD TVs with excellent digital tuners. However, some people use their 3575/76s to watch TV all the time since they report a "20% better pic" when watching thru their unit's tuner or line input.

PQ for Watching Commercial DVDs

Everyone should get a better pic with HDMI when playing most commercial movies since they're produced with digital Component video (YCbCr)... a digital source via a digital cable to a digital TV... brilliant, who's idea was that, anyway!

One example in my system: I was playing "Disturbia" via HDMI, YCbCr Format, 480p. One of the opening scenes is a father and son fishing in a pristine stream in mountain country. I put my face almost on my 1080p LCD screen, couldn't detect any pixels! Like a huge, continuous-tone photo... truly a Kodak moment! I'm actually IN the river... caught a 3-lb rainbow trout!

When you can go nose-to-nose with a 47" 1080p 16:9 LCD and not see the pixels, just a clear, sharp pic, you're in PQ heaven!

Even better: watch a really SCARY movie like "Hitcher" in a dark room, via HDMI, with DD5.1 surround turned up HIGH... one of those movies where you'll be saying "Quit talkin and just shoot him already!" many times! It could blind you with brilliance, give you a heart attack, and blow you outa your house! PLEASE BE CAREFUL IF YOU HAVE A HEART CONDITION... OR A GLASS HOUSE!

PQ for Recording thru the Tuner
Note: PQ is first and foremost determined by the source. If you record a program on an SD analog channel and its counterpart on a HD digital channel, you'll see an amazing difference, EVEN IF the HD digital channel is downconverted to SD in an analog cable feed. HD's higher starting resolution has lots more pic info to work with than SDTV does... it's like comparing compressed beef and filet mignon!

I can guarantee that, once you see the difference in recording from a digital vs. analog channel, you'll favor the digital channel whenever your program appears on one. When the switchover to all-digital takes place, we'll probably be receiving many more, or only, digital programs, even if fed thru an analog cable feed... and all will be right with the world!

I can ALSO guarantee that you WILL get a "softer" pic from analog channels to start with, and an even "softer" pic from a bad source like std def (SD) Dish thru an S-Video cable, and maybe even a "waxy" pic if you spread those bad 4:3 bit-thin pixels to fit a 16:9 HDTV. From what I've seen myself and heard from others, SD Dish even shown directly on an HDTV is TERRIBLE. Someone using SD Dish with the 3575/76 then posting all over these forums that it has "bad PQ" can only be AVS Forum's most egregious brand-basher, purposely looking for a way to say the 3575/76 has "bad PQ" without outright LYING. He's become the voice in the wilderness about PQ, so now he's shifted to bashing the case COLOR!
For recording analog 4:3 channels, I recommend staying with 1-hr-HQ or 2-hr-SP rec modes. Even with good reception, analog channels are like compressed beef -- lots of "bad stuff" in it -- so there's no way to end up with a filet! The recordings from these channels will look pretty good on a 27" CRT TV, but when you get your 1080p widescreen TV and try to stretch that compressed 4:3 cr** to fill the 16:9 screen, it looks "OK" at a distance, but don't sit too close.

If you're mostly a watch-and-delete person like me, you could record analog channels in 1-hr-HQ, even sports, and get excellent PQ for watching. I use 1-hr-HQ and 2-hr-SP for all our regular recordings, stretch the 4:3 pic to fill my 16:9 1080p screen, and love every minute of it!

HOWEVER, I've used several supposedly lower-quality rec modes on my downconverted digital HD channels, which are like a real filet mignon... they're chock-full-o-bits and don't need any artificial stretching, so you get outstanding, almost unbelievable results!

I rec a football game on digital ESPN HD in 3-hr-LP mode and the results were very good. For that game, and maybe all other pro sports, ESPN appeared to have used true HD equipment cuz the pic was outstanding! I think 3-hr-LP is OK for pro sports on ESPN... other networks are very spotty in that regard, so bad that even their so-called "digital HD" feed only looks as good as an analog channel. Fox broadcast the 2008 Super Bowl on analog and digital channels and neither was worth recording... the analog looked like a home video shot at SLP speed and the digital looked like analog... yet their "Idol" digital HD was outstanding!

I also used 3-hr-LP mode on a fast-action James Bond movie on digital TNT HD and, during a chase scene, Bond's in the back seat of a car and, with a lota shakin n' rollin, I could count the hairs on his face. No smearing, blockiness or even "mosquito noise," just a great pic, even later in a wild car chase with all sorts of auto-acrobatics on ice!

Also on digital TNT HD, I tested 6-hr-SLP mode on a drama ("Heartland"), and the PQ was excellent. I had to search hard for evidence of any degradation caused by 6-hr-SLP mode, finally finding a small operating room instrument panel that had a very small, lighted "Power" display on the panel where I finally noticed a slightly hairy edge.

Using 1-hr-HQ mode is actually mind-boggling. It's SO GOOD I was able to dub 6 real-time generations from HDD to DVD and back with no visible degradation in PQ, as described here. I know there's supposed to be SOME generational loss in PQ as more real-time copies are made, one from another, but I just couldn't see it on my 47" 1080p LCD. Gotta get a pixel microscope... or call CSI!

PQ for Copying VHS or Camera Tapes

For those who want to convert their VHS or camera tapes to DVD, the 3575/76 does an excellent job on that too! The signal amplification built into the 3575/76's coax passthru also amplifies the signal thru its line inputs. See this post for example of boost thru line input (E1).

I've copied lots of VHS tapes, but one special tape made me realize what a good job it did. We had a cruise tape shot on std 8mm, which I had copied to a VHS tape for our home-movie library.

When I went to copy the 2nd-gen VHS tape to my 3575's HDD, I noticed it started with a night scene on the ship and the black sky had many small, very annoying dropouts, like "sparklies." I copied the tape to the HDD via E1 and E2 (to see if any diff.), then dubbed to a DVD. When I reviewed the HDD and DVD copies, the dropouts were reduced in size and quantity by 50% or more.

Many DVDRs have circuitry to "clean up" VCR tapes (some only on one input, others with user settings), but my 3575's copy quality thru its external inputs is very good...equal to or better than my Pio 640 in that regard.

One 3575 user tested its time base corrector (TBC) capabilities and reported this: "I've been testing the 3575 lately, and it exhibits excellent TBC performance on external sources. The Horizontal Jitter reduction is comparable to the internal TBCs in the JVC and Panasonic VCRs, easily outperforming other DVD Recorders as well as the Datavideo external TBCs. Very impressive!" That post is here.

Easy mistake: If you do this yourself and want to truly assess the 3575/76's effect on quality, make sure you don't compare the original ("before") pic thru the 3575 since that will be the "cleaned up" version! Play the original tape directly to the TV so you'll have a true before-and-after comparison.

A New MPEG-2 Codec and Algorithm in the 3575?

In Nov 2007, I posted about the great PQ I was seeing even at longer rec modes from my downrezzed digital HD channels and wondered if Philips had developed a "different algorithm" for MPEG-2 encoding or something. My question might have been answered in a recent article about who's doing what with DVD chips, part of which reads:

"The gap between them [Zoran/ESS and LSI/Philips] could widen further, as LSI Logic, whose MPEG encoding technology is already in its fifth generation, continues to hone its encoding skills, while Philips is adding to its new MPEG-2 codec optimized hardware blocks for running new picture improvement algorithms such as adaptive picture sharpness detection and de-blocking artifacts removal."

It's quite possible the 3575/76 has benefited from Philips' "new MPEG-2 codec" and "new picture improvement algorithms."

OMG, it just dawned on me... Philips designed this thing for moving pictures and forgot that some people like static test patterns!?


wajo

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

Quote:
Originally Posted by bron
Dude, kudos to you! I don't have one, but it's nice to see someone go to so much trouble and make a really useful post that I am sure will help many.

My hat's off to you, wabjxo!

Bron
+1

james.92

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

After 2600 posts in the original thread, it's probably difficult for new people to find basic info on the 3575 without a lot of digging... even hard to find your OWN posts now!

Since some of the subjects apply to any DVDR, people just starting out with other brands might find something useful in their setup and op. as well?


wajo

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

Well, I've bookmarked this thread and I, for one, plan to read through 'em as I have the time.

bron

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

Save Yourself a Lotta Grief... Read This BEFORE You Make a Single-Disc Mistake!

People recommending single-disc recorders... those without a hard disk drive (HDD)... are either (1) clueless, or (2) rabid fans of a brand that no longer makes recorders with a HDD and digital tuners for North America, and they're pi**ed at the 3575/76's success and the enthusiasm of its users! And a -RAM disc is NOT "just like a HDD" as some suggest. A -RAM disc is just a 10X-more-expensive disc that can chase play but has the same limited space as any other disc, can be played only in other -RAM machines, and adds disc management to your hourly chores. Come to think of it, it's rather barbaric and demeaning to be a slave to any cr***y little disc!

NO single-disc recorder can overcome the MANY advantages of a HDD recorder listed below... first the headings for those who don't want to read a lotta words, then the full description of each advantage.
  1. Save Yourself a Lotta Grief.
  2. Eliminate Media Logistics.
  3. Record a Gazillion Shows in a Row on ONE Recorder... While You're in Poughkeepsie!
  4. Eliminate Lost Recordings Due to Media Failure.
  5. Record Virtually Unlimited Hours at Best Record Modes.
  6. Record Instantly the Moment You See Something You Like.
  7. Record While Simultaneously Playing HDD Titles or DVDs.
  8. Edit Multiple Recordings on ONE Recorder... No 2nd Recorder, No Computer.
  9. Resume Play on Up To 600 Titles... ALL Titles, ANY time.
  10. Chase Play Instantly... ANY Time.
  11. Extend the Life of Your DVD Burner.
  12. Make High-Speed LOSSLESS DVD Copies of Your Favorite Shows on ONE Recorder.
  13. Copy, Edit and Assemble Your Old Home Movies, Then Copy to DVDs on ONE Recorder.
  14. Make More Copies of Your Home DVDs Anytime on ONE Recorder.
  15. Save Enough $$$ on Discs to Pay for the 3575/76.
  16. Be Able to Record When DVDs Are No Longer Available.
  17. Help Save Our Planet and Prevent Macroeconomic Destruction.
  18. Don't Worry about Panasonic Warning against Risky Behavior: USING DISCS.
1. Save Yourself a Lotta Grief!
If you buy a single-disc recorder, your life will be filled with grief, esp. if your significant other finds out you coulda BOUGHT A HDD RECORDER INSTEAD! You'll be stuck with handling a buncha discs (smaller but less-durable versions of VHS cassettes), calculating disc space, tracking/identifying disc content, scheduling your watch/record times to the recorder's schedule not yours, failure to record, producing coasters, spending more $$$ on discs, spending even MORE $$$ on another recorder to make a copy, requiring a computer, inadvertently teaching your kids to curse, and no vacations over 2 hours! You won't even REALIZE you've become a SLAVE to a shiny little disc. You'll even go out and buy ANOTHER single-disc recorder just to make a copy, and you'll feel OK for awhile. You won't KNOW you're stuck in "gearhead" mentality and you'll NEVER admit you made a mistake... it'll be like not asking for directions so you don't have to admit to your significant other, or yourself, that you're lost! By the time you capitulate, you might have 10 single-disc recorders stacked on top of each other cuz disc management tasks keep your mind off your bizarre behavior. Imagine... a simple, inexpensive HDD recorder could save you from a whole lotta grief: Dr. Phil, divorce, straightjacket, padded cell... who knows how bad it could get!?

2. Eliminate Media Logistics!
Remember videotape cassettes and your tape management headaches? Well, if you buy a single-disc recorder, welcome to your NEW disc management headaches. You'll just be replacing your old tapes with smaller, shinier versions... still "media" you gotta handle EVERY DAY, sometimes every hour or two... and they're EASIER TO DAMAGE! You could take SOME comfort in the fact that your stack of things to watch won't be as HIGH with discs as it was with VHS tapes! BUT, you can be totally stackless and ELIMINATE hourly disc handling altogether with a HDD! Don't worry about changing discs and identifying disc content, or having a disc loaded with enough space to record your shows (might require math skills!), or erasing your rewritable -RAM disc before next recording (you HAVE watched the shows already recorded on it, right?), or disc failure due to scratches, fingerprints, snot, dust mites, or a hundred other reasons (like a Memorex special at the drug store). The HDD is guaranteed to be impervious to scratches, fingerprints, snot, dust mites, and totally Memorex-proof! You'll only have to handle a DVD if you want a copy off the HDD, then simply high-speed dub a mirror-image, lossless copy to the on-board DVD drive. AND, you'll never have to say, while in bed with other things on your mind, "Hey, did you load a good disc to record our shows on?"

3. Record a Gazillion Shows in a Row on ONE Recorder... While You're in Poughkeepsie!
One 3575 user recently recorded 35 shows in a row while he was on a long trip, 10 titles per week over 3.5 weeks, USING ONLY 6 TIMER PROGRAMS! This means you could record, what... a "gazillion" titles if you used all 36 timer slots!? (Except the 3575/76 can only hold 600 titles on the HDD... bummer! ) With the 3575/76, you can set up to 36 timer programs covering multiple days, times and shows... back-to-back, different channels, rec modes, lengths, aspects, doesn't matter... and when you're ready, they'll be there on the HDD, accessible thru an on-screen menu with full-motion thumbnail pics and sound. Once in your lazy chair, press Play and watch your shows, WHILE THE NEXT GAZILLION SHOWS ARE RECORDING! Skip commercials. Go back instantly and replay, watch in slo-mo, or advance frame-by-frame. Mark spots to return to and see again. FF/REW long distances at "digital" speed. Go to a specific time in a show, or the next show, instantly with a simple menu command. To duplicate this one user's 3.5 weeks of unattended recording at 2-hr-SP rec mode, you'd need 35 single-disc recorders! Oh, wait, you COULD train your cat to load and unload the discs... oops, need an opposing thumb and no claws for that... a monkey's trainable, but he might see his reflection in the shiny disc, think it's a rival and trash your house! You'd have to tell your ins. co. it was all caused by a single-disc recorder and a jealous monkey!

4. Eliminate Lost Recordings Due to Media Failure.
Want to make sure you get a successful initial recording of your favorite TV programs, some of which might never be aired again? Record to the HDD, where failure to record due to media problems is virtually unheard of, compared to many reports of failure due to problems with DVDs. Even if you decide to timer-rec to a DVD, rather than the HDD, and that DVD is bad or fills up during recording, or you forget to load a DVD, or the program is "Copy-Once" protected, the 3575/76 will auto-switch the recording to the HDD! In addition, you'll have multiple chances to get your programs on DVD, even if that media happens to fail and you get a "coaster" (unplayable DVD disc)... the master recording is still safely on the HDD. With a single-disc recorder, you could easily be setting your next drink on your favorite show that won't play.

5. Record Virtually Unlimited Hours at Best Record Modes.
You say you want the best picture quality (PQ)? Just set your HDD DVDR for 1-hr-HQ mode FOR ANY LENGTH OF TIME and blow any single-disc recorder outa the water! You'll still be recording when the single-disc recorder has to stop recording after 1-hour at the same rec mode! PQ-obssessors are single-disc-recorder gearheads who HAVE TO WORRY ABOUT PQ ALL THE TIME cuz their little discs can only fit a very limited amount of stuff, and they have to make the best use of that limited space! With a HDD recorder, the physical medium, the HDD, has virtually no physical time or size limits. You could record EVERYTHING at 1-hr-HQ mode and get amazingly beautiful recordings every time! Also no problem with making beautiful DVD copies later, if desired, as described in this post. If you're like me, you'll start using your HDD machine by making lots of discs copying home movies, then you'll sit back and enjoy your favorite shows on the HDD, in the HIGHEST QUALITY POSSIBLE, and discs will be only an occasional nuisance.

6. Record Instantly the Moment You See Something You Like.
Do you ever see something just coming on you didn't expect and wish you could record instantly? No sweat! With a HDD, just press REC on that channel, then watch a channel on the TV or one of your shows recorded on the HDD or play a commercial DVD while it's recording. With a single-disc recorder, you'll ALWAYS have a blank disc in place for just this kind of emergency, right? R-i-i-i-g-h-t. OR, if you're already watching a recorded disc, guess what... no option to record something else! Sorry, Gearhead, outa luck on that one too!

7. Record While Simultaneously Playing HDD Titles or DVDs.
What's that you say... do both at the same time? Yup! Got a long list of Timer programs recording on the HDD? No problem... again! While it's recording, play the latest commercial movies on DVD or any other already recorded title from your HDD... it's multi-tasking! With a single-disc recorder, it's one disc at a time, another reminder of how that cr***y little disc is your Master. I hear it talkin to you now: "change me... feed me... I don't like that disc... don't be so rough... watch your language!"

8. Edit Multiple Recordings on ONE Recorder... No 2nd Recorder, No Computer!
Want to slice and dice your daily/weekly recordings or special events, then assemble them for multi-title dubbing to disc for your library? Record a series of shows on the HDD, then cut commercials, etc... at your leisure... in your leisure suit... in your leisure chair... take 2 days if you want. When you're ready, put them in order in a dub list and dub a copy to a DVD... the FIRST and ONLY disc you'll have to handle in this process. If a DVD turns out to be a coaster, just make another copy from the HDD. With a single-disc recorder? Well, uh, you DO have a 2nd recorder to copy the edited disc, don't you? Or you could copy the VOB files to a computer... OMG, loads of fun for the entire family!?

9. Resume Play on Up To 600 Titles... ALL Titles, ANY time.
Someone calls while you're watching one of your HDD recordings or you have to suddenly go out? Press STOP, come back later, and start watching from where you left off. The 3575/76 remembers the last PLAY ("Resume") position of all HDD titles (up to 600, altho I've only personally tested 12 titles thru multiple on/off cycles and incremental viewings). You can leave ALL your recorded shows at various places and come back to watch them later. With a single-disc DVDR, better finish watching an entire show before another show needs to be recorded cuz, if you eject that disc to load a NEW one, you'll lose your place... DVDRs don't remember the "Resume" position on ejected discs!? But then, you might LIKE your TV-recording/watching life controlled by a shiny little disc!?

10. Chase Play Instantly... ANY Time.
Watching a show live and someone rings the doorbell or you get a call from Mom or Mother Nature? Don't worry, your HDD is ALWAYS ready to record. You won't have to panic and make sure there's a specialized RAM disc (unplayable in many machines) in the tray AND that it has enough empty space!!! Just calmly press REC, go to the door or tell Mom you love her but.... When thru, press PLAY and the show you were watching live plays back from where you pressed REC. Or, recording something with a timer program but decide you want to watch it now? Press PLAY and the show being recorded plays back from the beginning, with full-featured playback controls.

11. Extend the Life of Your DVD Burner.
Heat is the worst enemy of the laser diode in your DVD burner, and recording uses max. power so it develops the most heat. In a single-disc recorder, you HAVE TO heat the diode cuz you HAVE TO use the DVD burner. With a HDD, you won't use your burner at all to timeshift (record-watch-delete) your daily shows or even to edit those shows. Playing commercial DVDs will use the burner at very low power, and only IF/WHEN you want a DVD copy will you use the burner at full power. Even then, it'll be for a MUCH shorter time cuz the HDD unit can dub at high-speed, whereas the single-disc recorder is ALWAYS running in real-time. This should extend the life of your DVD burner dramatically. Some sad news, tho: Seagate specs the HDD for a min. of 50,000 start/stop cycles so, if you power your 3575/76 up/down three times a day, you might get ONLY 45 YEARS out of the HDD! I plan to be buried with my working HDD... with my favorite shows on it, of course!
The next three advantages of a HDD derive from the fact that a single-disc recorder's manual doesn't even mention "dub" and only mentions "copy" when it talks about "copy protection" and "copyright."
12. Make High-Speed LOSSLESS DVD Copies of Your Favorite Shows on ONE Recorder.
Recorded your favorite show, movie or sporting event, maybe even edited it some, then decide to make a copy? Easy to do with a HDD by dubbing from the HDD to the onboard DVD in high-speed, which makes a "mirror-image" copy without any loss of quality (PQ). Let's see, where are the instructions for high-speed, lossless dubbing with a single-disc recorder... maybe even "lossy" dubbing... OK, ANY kind of dubbing? Actually, with a single-disc recorder, EVERYTHING is in REAL-TIME, so you're recording in real-time, then any copies you make... requiring another recorder... will also be in real-time, which can lose some PQ in the process. And EVEN IF you buy a 2nd recorder for copying, still gotta hope the 3 hours it'll take for a 3-hr movie won't end with another useless coaster!

13. Copy, Edit and Assemble Your Old Home Movies, Then Copy to DVDs on ONE Recorder.
Want to transfer precious memories from videotapes to DVDs for the family, edited and in a specific order? Use the HDD as a platform to store your home movies, in random order. Edit them if necessary. Then put them in proper order in a dub list before copying to DVDs for your library... and those family members you're still speaking to. In a single-disc recorder?... well, we know the answer by now!

14. Make More Copies of Your Home DVDs Anytime on ONE Recorder.
Got some home-made DVDs you need more copies of later... much later? Pop a Finalized or Unfinalized DVD in the tray, start it playing, press the DIRECT DUBBING (DD) button and it copies in real-time to the HDD. It copies the entire title playing, from first frame, no matter where in the play cycle you press the DD button. Then just dub as many more copies as you need in LOSSLESS High speed. Tested for PQ thru 6 real-time generations with no visible degradation (see link in #5 above). Have fun figuring a way to do THIS in a single-disc recorder!
Enough real-world, everyday stuff above, so time for some more interesting reasons that were fun to think about.
15. Save Enough $$$ on Discs to Pay for the 3575/76.
Many people in this forum with single-disc recorders claim to have used thousands of discs in the past 2-4 years. Say you had a single-disc recorder and used 2,000 discs over those years at $0.30 each (plus some more-expensive -RAM discs), it'd cost you $600 JUST FOR STD, NON-RAM DISCS. But if, today, you switched to a HDD unit and did mostly timeshifting (record, watch, delete), you could STILL buy the 3576 for $248 and pay for it by NOT buying just 825 discs at $0.30 each... that is, you'd still have enough left over to buy 1175 discs... but you wouldn't need even that many with a HDD unit!

16. Be Able to Record When DVDs Are No Longer Available.
If they ever stop making optical DVD discs, everyone with a single-disc recorder will have a PLAYER... but then only if someone else keeps producing movies on them ... guess a HDD might come in handy then! If the HDD goes bad after many years, have it replaced and continue recording when everyone else has gone to HYPER-EXPENSIVE Blufluorescent-Bidirectional-Flux-Capacitor-Induction-Generated-Solid-State-Mediablasters... with Blaster Media at $1,000 each... with free Root Kit cuz only Sony makes 'em!

17. Help Save Our Planet and Prevent Macroeconomic Destruction.
By reducing use of petroleum-based DVD discs, a HDD recorder has a much smaller carbon footprint and, if enough people start using them, could prevent or delay our macroeconomic destruction! Al Gore probably has NOTHING but HDD recorders in his twin-engine jet and 17,000 square-foot home. You can do your part to save the North Pole ice, Polar Bears, and Eskimos who, by the way, have vowed to seek out and live with all single-disc climate-change cynics if they're driven out of their natural habitat by global warming.
If the items above haven't convinced you to get a HDD recorder, only one bullet left, and it's a doozy!
18. Don't Worry about Panasonic Warning against Risky Behavior: USING DISCS!
The manual for virtually every HDD unit says essentially that the HDD is not for permanent storage. Some people are "scared" by this and read it as "the HDD is unreliable." Not even close to true... so much more reliable than DVD discs, they're not even in the same game, much less ballpark! The 3575/76's "strong suit" is its HDD, a "best-of-breed" Seagate model with very high reliability specs.

However, what's REALLY scary is this in the manuals for virtually ALL Panasonic single-disc recorders, which have NO HDD and must use DISCS to even BE recorders:

"The manufacturer accepts no responsibility and offers no compensation for loss of recorded or edited material due to a problem with the unit or recordable media, and accepts no responsibility and offers no compensation for any subsequent damage caused by such loss.

Examples of causes of such losses are
  • A DISC recorded and edited with this unit is played in a DVD Recorder or computer disc drive manufactured by another company.
  • A DISC used as described above and then played again in this unit. [Say WHAT!]
  • A DISC recorded and edited with a DVD Recorder or computer disc drive manufactured by another company is played in this unit."

wajo

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

As someone who is on the verge of abandoning my VCR in favor of a DVD recorder, this post is an outstanding resource for getting to the core of operating and using the Phillips DVDR3735H.

Thank you!!!

finsup

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

Quote:
Originally Posted by wabjxo
Here's a list of subjects that might be of special interest to new users and those just looking for info:

Dude, kudos to you! I don't have one, but it's nice to see someone go to so much trouble and make a really useful post that I am sure will help many.

My hat's off to you, wabjxo!

Bron

bron

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

Quote:
Originally Posted by jjeff
No DVDR's, including the 3575 can tune Sat. channels. They will all need to be tuned using the Sat. tuner. Cable is different, you can tune some channels directly on the 3575's built in tuner, but NOT sat.
For Sat. use, most people use the sat. companies own DVR. And just use the 3575 to offload content to the HDD or DVD.
Thanks jjeff for the reply, so what you are saying is that the way that I am doing it now, by setting a recording date and time and leaving the sat box on that channel is the only way that I can record. One channel at a time.

rct0361

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

Quote:
Originally Posted by rct0361
Thanks jjeff for the reply, so what you are saying is that the way that I am doing it now, by setting a recording date and time and leaving the sat box on that channel is the only way that I can record. One channel at a time.
Check your sat tuner instructions - most of them can be programmed directly from the built-in program guide, or by setting up your own timers. When I record from my sat tuner, I first select the future program to watch there on the guide, causing a "tune to this channel" timer to be set automatically. Then I go to the Philips, and set a record timer there for the same future time on E1 (external SVideo input from the sat receiver).

amesdp

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

Quote:
Originally Posted by amesdp
Check your sat tuner instructions - most of them can be programmed directly from the built-in program guide, or by setting up your own timers. When I record from my sat tuner, I first select the future program to watch there on the guide, causing a "tune to this channel" timer to be set automatically. Then I go to the Philips, and set a record timer there for the same future time on E1 (external SVideo input from the sat receiver).
Thanks amesdp for the reply,

HMMMM, ok some more info that I didn't know (hate being a rookie at this stuff) but I do love learning how to make it work. Ok, so now what you are saying is to check my manual for the HD sat receiver that I have and try to set a program to view in a future date a time and then I can set the Philips to those date and times and it will be able to record those channels. I think I understand what you are meaning, now do I have to leave the sat box on all the time when I am wanting to record. Thanks again for your help.

rct0361

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

I would think it would depend on your Sat. box. Some may have the ability to turn on by themselves, I'm just not sure. I don't have Sat.

jjeff

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

Quote:
Originally Posted by jjeff
I would think it would depend on your Sat. box. Some may have the ability to turn on by themselves, I'm just not sure. I don't have Sat.
Thanks again jjeff,

I am going to check the sat box out tonight when I get off work. Never thought about the settings on the sat box playing a role with DVDR setting. That's why I love these forums, get more technical expertise out of this site than I do calling Philips customer service SO-CALLED Technical Experts. YEAH RIGHT THEY ARE.

rct0361

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

Yes, my sat tuner turns on automatically at the programmed times (or probably more accurately it's never really "off", just on standby).

amesdp

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

You should be able to set programs to be recorded from the satellite tuner, and the channels will change automatically. Then you will need to set the timers on the recorder to coincide independently.

I do it on my Dish tuner all the time, and I believe Direct's are the same.

Rammitinski

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

Thanks everyone for the help, I played around with the sat box last night and saw where you preset a channel to watch or several channels at different times. So, now I can set the recorder to each of those different times and get several recordings in a day. Thanks again for the help, the rookie is starting to become a veteran in electronics.

rct0361

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

You might want to set your clock manually (1st option in Clock menu) and turn Auto-Clock Off and DST Off. Since you're on Sat, you don't have a coax in place where the 3575 can receive its clock update signal twice daily. One other person had some timer rec. problems due to this... clock got "confused" or something cuz it couldn't find auto-clock signals?

So far, no evidence the 3575 can receive auto-clock signal thru an external input.

wajo

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

Quote:
Originally Posted by wajo
...So far, no evidence the 3575 can receive auto-clock signal thru an external input.
It gets the time signal from analog PBS only.
I've been wondering if Philips will be ably to
fix that with a future firmware upgrade, so that
the 3575 will ba able to set the time using the
PBS Digital signal.
If not, no auto clock set after February 17, 2009...

Chuck44

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

Quote:
Originally Posted by wajo
You might want to set your clock manually (1st option in Clock menu) and turn Auto-Clock Off and DST Off. Since you're on Sat, you don't have a coax in place where the 3575 can receive its clock update signal twice daily. One other person had some timer rec. problems due to this... clock got "confused" or something cuz it couldn't find auto-clock signals?

So far, no evidence the 3575 can receive auto-clock signal thru an external input.
Thanks wajo, when I originally set up the unit I'm pretty sure I manually set the clock, but I don't think I turned off the DST on it. Will have to check on that and make sure it is off.

rct0361

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

3 more refurb. units avail. on ubid.com, buy-it-now at $209 BEFORE 10:00 PM CST TODAY, FEB 1.

wajo

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

Has anyone any success getting movies (AVI, MPEG2, VOBs, DIVx ... on a USB HDD) play with the USB connection?

Sam Ontario

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sam Ontario
Has anyone any success getting movies (AVI, MPEG2, VOBs, DIVx ... on a USB HDD) play with the USB connection?
AFAIK it cannot be done.

Chuck44

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

Has anyone tried formatting fat32 an external USB HDD drive and put MPEG2 movies on it and successfully play on the 3575 USB? Will 3575 recognise any USB HDD at all?

Sam Ontario

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

I believe they have purposely disabled the feature to play movies via the USB connector. The European version has this feature, but I believe fear of copyright holders made Philips disable the feature for the US market. If you figure out a way to do it, I'm sure many would be interested in how you did it, but again I think they purposely deleted this feature for US.

jjeff

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sam Ontario
Has anyone tried formatting fat32 an external USB HDD drive and put MPEG2 movies on it and successfully play on the 3575 USB? Will 3575 recognise any USB HDD at all?
Yes, a FAT32-format USB HDD works on the 3575 USB port, as long as the drive's USB interface doesn't draw too much power. But:
- It will only see MP3 and JPG files on the HDD. It can't see AVI or MPG or DAT files at all (no, it doesn't work to rename your AVI files to MP3 or JPG - I tried it)
- The navigation interface is pretty limited. It can only list the first 999 files in all sub-directories.

amesdp

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

Thanks amesdp.

Philips implementation of USB is pretty useless then.

Sam Ontario

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

Above SD output I need HDMI?Ok I'm hooking my new 3575 to my Infocus 4805 via component and the picture doesn't look any better on HD channels than the Lite-on (SD) I had before. I'm pressing the HDMI button expecting a higher res will also be spit out over component outputs. To no avail the projector does not re-scan and setup the source as expected. This indicates the output res over component (and probably s-video) doesn't go above SD. Am I correct that I have to run to the store and buy a (long) HDMI cable and DVI adapter(no HDMI on the projector)?

casiodave

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

Yes, no upconvert over Component.

wajo

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

Yes but don't run to the store. Unless you live next to Monoprice.com. They will be a fraction of the cost of most local stores. Especially for longer lengths.

jjeff

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

Don't expect much, if any improvement upscaled over HDMI. Chances are the InFocus is already doing a better job of upscaling than the Philips will do.

Rammitinski

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

I snagged a 12 footer from WM just for the big game. It's not long enough so it will go back. Nobody stocks em' at 25'. Thanks for pointing me to Monoprice.com, I usually use pccables.com. I hope I see a difference.

casiodave

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

Quote:
Originally Posted by wajo
Yes, no upconvert over Component.
I don't remember, but are you sure that the Philips can't upscale to 480p over component? The projector he's got is only 480p, you know.

Rammitinski

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

I'm looking to throw QAM HD channells at it (the 4805) and am hoping for something a little better than SD. Yes it does an incredible job at SD. I've tried the MyHD 130 and even that was not transformational (before it freezes my computer after 1min.).

casiodave

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rammitinski
I don't remember, but are you sure that the Philips can't upscale to 480p over component? The projector he's got is only 480p, you know.
480p isn't considered upscaling, so the 3575 can output 480p (i.e., progressive scan) via component. This is a legal definition, not a technical one - it's whatever is permitted by the terms of the DVD licensing association.

amesdp

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

Quote:
Originally Posted by casiodave
I snagged a 12 footer from WM just for the big game. It's not long enough so it will go back. Nobody stocks em' at 25'. Thanks for pointing me to Monoprice.com, I usually use pccables.com. I hope I see a difference.
I agree with Ramm, you might not see any difference with the upconverting. I used HDMI and actually had my 3575 set for 480p. I thought that looked best. Maybe you should try moving your 3575 closer to the TV to try the 12' cable you have, just to see if it will be worth it before you send off for a longer cable.
As far as tuning in HD channels on the 3575 and outputting them on your TV you should get a better PQ that tuning them direct with your SD tuner TV, but I don't think it will be anything like a true HD tuner, although since you only have a 480p TV I'm not positive what the difference will be. I know using my Panny DVDR w/digital tuner, outputting to my 24" Sony SD TV via component cables, it was only marginally better going through the DVDR tuned to a HD channel, vs the same SD channel tuned directly on the Sony. The only way you'd know for sure is to get a true standalone HD tuner and hook it up direct to your TV, and compare that to the downrezzed output of the 3575.

jjeff

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

Turning Progressive scan on the 3575 actually makes the picture look worse on the Infocus 4805. The 3575 probably isn't the panacea I was looking for.

casiodave

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

Yes I believe many people think DVDR's with the digital tuner will give them better PQ watching HDTV. I know I thought a DVDR w/digital tuner and upconverting would give me almost HD PQ, but I was sadly mistaken. It's not just the 3575, it's all DVDR's. Many people were hoping for HD passthru on the DVDR's, so we could at least watch HD using the DVDR's tuner, but not this year anyway.

jjeff

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

Quote:
Originally Posted by casiodave
Turning Progressive scan on the 3575 actually makes the picture look worse on the Infocus 4805. The 3575 probably isn't the panacea I was looking for.
Before you pack it in, and assuming you're using HDMI cable, try setting the 3575 for YCbCr (digital Component) in the HDMI Format menu. Your proj. is YCbCr compatible. Set the 3575 HDMI output for 480p, the first format when pressing the HDMI button.

Also, check your 3575 setting for TV Aspect in the Video menu. For digital channels, that should be set for 16:9 Wide. The 3575's TV Aspect setting is for viewing and recording live TV on digital channels, not for playback.

wajo

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

Wabjxo, I knew Vizio's were a pretty good TV, but didnt realize they were psychic.......Could it be that you have a HDMI cable connected from the 3575 to your Vizio? I think HDMI has the capability to do something like this. I know on my Panny TV, there's something in the setup about CNTL w/hdmi, but I have it off. I personally would rather choose what and when I want to turn equip off/on. JMO
Is there a way to play a dvd on the 3575, and then pause the recording HDD to edit out unwanted parts? If not I am stilll destin to tie a external dvd player to my 3575's S-in, to edit out parts of the DVD that I dont want on the HDD. If so, that kinda stinks, I do that all the time with my Sony player and Panny DVDR, I record TV to the DVD, then play the DVD back, and edit out the commercials. Cant believe they would not enable pausing the HDD, while the DVD continues playing internally.

jjeff

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

Quote:
Originally Posted by jjeff
Wabjxo, I knew Vizio's were a pretty good TV, but didnt realize they were psychic.......Could it be that you have a HDMI cable connected from the 3575 to your Vizio? I think HDMI has the capability to do something like this. I know on my Panny TV, there's something in the setup about CNTL w/hdmi, but I have it off. I personally would rather choose what and when I want to turn equip off/on. JMO
HDMI is connected but no 3575 settings that trigger an interaction with connected components. Dunno!

Quote:
Originally Posted by jjeff
Is there a way to play a dvd on the 3575, and then pause the recording HDD to edit out unwanted parts? If not I am stilll destin to tie a external dvd player to my 3575's S-in, to edit out parts of the DVD that I dont want on the HDD. If so, that kinda stinks, I do that all the time with my Sony player and Panny DVDR, I record TV to the DVD, then play the DVD back, and edit out the commercials. Cant believe they would not enable pausing the HDD, while the DVD continues playing internally.
You mention two different things in ways you "used to do it." Using your Sony player to play a DVD to the 3575 works the same way: PLAY, REC, PAUSE the rec. where you want to cut sections.

An internal DVD can only be copied thru the Dubbing menu (unfinalized disc) or DIRECT DUBBING button (finalized discs, starts from beginning of disc). In either case, they're automated ops so no pausing on the record or play side.

If you play a DVD internally and press REC, you'll be recording whatever the tuner is set on, not the DVD.

wajo

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

Quote:
Originally Posted by jjeff
...Is there a way to play a dvd on the 3575, and then pause the recording HDD to edit out unwanted parts? If not I am stilll destin to tie a external dvd player to my 3575's S-in, to edit out parts of the DVD that I dont want on the HDD. If so, that kinda stinks, I do that all the time with my Sony player and Panny DVDR, I record TV to the DVD, then play the DVD back, and edit out the commercials. Cant believe they would not enable pausing the HDD, while the DVD continues playing internally.
Why not simply dub the DVD to the 3575's HDD,
then use Scene Delete to remove the commercials?

Chuck44

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

Quote:
Originally Posted by jjeff
Bummer on the inability to selectivly delete .x channels. In my case I have several minor channels that I dont care to have in my scan list, but I do like one of the minors. I have never seen a digital device not be able to selectivly do this, but then again I havent seen everything out there either.
The Philips' primary function is as a recorder. The tuner is just an afterthought in these things - and in all of these 1st generation recorders - that's painfully obvious. They only begrudgingly put them in there as it is.

Rammitinski

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

Chuck44, I think you have the answer, with the scene delete option. It's a different way "than I used to do it", watching the DVD, then pausing the recording device, goes back to my VCR days. In your way, I just play the dvd to the HDD, then watch the HDD later, removing the commecials as they come up.
Not like "I used to do it" but should work just fine. Thanks

jjeff

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

Quote:
Originally Posted by jjeff
Chuck44, I think you have the answer, with the scene delete option. It's a different way "than I used to do it", watching the DVD, then pausing the recording device, goes back to my VCR days. In your way, I just play the dvd to the HDD, then watch the HDD later, removing the commecials as they come up.
Not like "I used to do it" but should work just fine. Thanks
jjeff, you are about to discover the other great thing about DVDRs with a HDD. Editing in the HDD is far more precise, far easier, than the old pause/unpause we used on our VCRs. You will never miss a frame you want. You can start the realtime dub before you go to bed, or to work, out shopping, whatever. When you return, you just FF through the HDD recording, and delete what you want!

kjbawc

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

Truthfully, most of my recordings will be direct to the 3575's HDD, but unless I want to be like Wabjxo......and buy several 3575's I will still be recording to DVD on one or more of my collection of Panny's, when several events are on the same time / different channel

jjeff

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

Quote:
Originally Posted by jjeff
GSfromCT, yes as Wabjxo said the 3575 does have rapid play at 1.3x, which is quite intelagable as well as a good picture. A sony player that I have, has .6x up to 1.4x. The 1.4x is a little fast to understand, and on the 1.3x the video is quite jerky. I'm glad the 3575 has the 1.3x and is not jerky. I think it's the fastest a person can speed up the material, and still comprehend whats going on. That said for just faster scanning w/audio, I like my older Panny's which have 2x w/sound. The new EZ series Panny's have cut the sound on the 2x speed.

Originally Posted by Wabjxo: Yes, in fact it has 2 "Rapid Play" speeds with sound: slower (0.8X) and faster (1.3X)... bottom right button on remote.

Its "regular" FF speeds, w/o sound, are 2X, 20X and 40X.

P.S. Has 3 slo-mo speeds also, after pressing Pause: 1/3X, 1/8X and 1/16X fwd, same back except 1/4X instead of 1/3X.
Thanks guys, that is great news indeed! So these rapid play speeds will also have sound while the machine is recording?
If so that is a bonus from my current Pio. In fact I thought I'd be getting a reply that this feature is not possible with the 3575 when instead it sounds like the 3575 does a better job. Cool!

GSfromCT

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

Quote:
Originally Posted by GSfromCT
Thanks guys, that is great news indeed! So these rapid play speeds will also have sound while the machine is recording?
If so that is a bonus from my current Pio. In fact I thought I'd be getting a reply that this feature is not possible with the 3575 when instead it sounds like the 3575 does a better job. Cool!
Yes, full audio with Rapid Play speeds (0.8X or 1.3X):

1. For watching one already recorded HDD title while recording a new program

2. For Chase Playing a title currently being recorded.

wajo

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

FF, REW, Slo-Mo and Rapid Play with Audio

The 3575/76's standard FF and REW are w/o audio and operate at the following speeds:
FF = 2X, 20X, 40X.
REW = 5X, 20X, 40X.

It also has 3 Slo-Mo speeds w/o audio, available after pressing Pause:
Fwd = 1/3X, 1/8X, 1/16X.
Rev = 1/4X, 1/8X, 1/16X.

It also has 2 Rapid Play speeds with full audio, using the bottom right button on the remote.:
Slower than normal = 0.8X.
Faster than normal = 1.3X.

Full audio with Rapid Play speeds can be used during normal playback and even in the following watch/record combinations:

1. For watching a recorded HDD title while recording a new program.

2. For Chase Playing a program currently being recorded.


wajo

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

TV Channels the 3575/76 Can Tune by Itself

The 3575/76's analog NTSC tuner has the standard CATV channels 1-125. The digital ATSC/QAM tuner has channels 1-135 for both over-the-air (OTA) (ATSC) and cable (QAM, or Quadrature Amplitude Modulation) signals. As explained to me, satellite subscribers need a proprietary receiver to tune their sat-delivered signals, so the standard DVDR or TV can't tune those signals independently.

To answer some recent questions:
  1. Can the 3575/76 record more than one channel at a time? No. Has a single tuner. Can record one channel while watching another on the TV or thru a STB.
  2. Does it pick up channel schedules or have a TVGOS system? No.
  3. Can it record premium (paid) channels? Many people can record HBO and other premium channels they pay for in their normal monthly subscription fee but not PPV or on-demand "extra-cost" programs, which are ALWAYS scrambled... duh!. Depends on your service provider.
  4. QAM tuner is not listed in literature. Does it really have a QAM tuner? Yes, see this post for a test of the 3576 for potential use in a Los Angeles city emergency response system, where it had to tune all 135 digital channels in its QAM tuner.
Bottom line: If you have a TV with digital tuner, the 3575/76 should be able to tune the same digital channels as your TV, and possibly more based on some reports. One user found the 3576 could tune his "mixed bag" of 135 digital QAM channels for a city-wide emergency response system (see link below on QAM). If you don't have a digital TV, your 3575/76 should still be able to tune any digital channels you receive "in-the-clear" (not scrambled), even tho your current TV can't tune them now. Whatever TV you have now makes no difference to the 3575/76 since it sends its tuned channels via a line input to your TV (Composite, S-Video, Component, or HDMI).

OTA Channels

The 3575/76's Analog and ATSC (digital OTA) tuners can tune any OTA channels broadcast in your local area and picked up by your antenna. The OTA analog channels are the ones that will disappear in Feb 2009. The OTA digital channels, including HDTV, will continue to be broadcast after Feb 2009. (Cable subscribers will not be affected, at least until 2012 according to government and industry sources.)

Fortunately, AVS has an entire forum devoted to identifying and updating people on the digital/HDTV OTA and cable channels currently available in their locale. Here's the forum.

Cable QAM Channels

Different areas of the U.S. can expect to tune some clear-QAM (unscrambled) cable channels independently with the 3575/76. (Check link directly above.) A lot depends on area and service provider, so there are no hard-and-fast rules or expectations. Depending on your level of subscribed cable service, the 3575/76 will tune all of your normal analog channels on the channel numbers you're used to.

Digital channels are a different story. The 3575/76's digital ATSC/QAM tuner has channels 1-135 but cablecos often place their digital (QAM) channels in higher-numbered slots... and, of course, offer a set-top box (STB) for an additional fee so you can tune those channels on THEIR assigned channel numbers.

However, many of those high-numbered channels "map" to one of the 3575/76's ATSC/QAM tuner slots. This means you can usually receive some of your cableco's "in-the-clear" (unscrambled) digital channels, even if you're subscribed only to basic analog service.

Some users even receive a lot of digital channels. I've read of several people receiving 35-45 digital channels w/o a STB. You should at least be able to receive your local digital channels in-the-clear, and *probably* channels like ESPN, TNT, TBS, CW, My68 and Discovery.

Most or all cablecos also have "premium" channels that are included in your basic monthly service fee, and these are not usually scrambled so they're recordable. They also have pay-per-view (PPV) or other "On-Demand" programs you pay extra for (i.e., not included in your monthly service fee), and most DO scramble those so they're only recordable thru the cableco's STB.
I'm on "basic" analog cable (not "extended basic"), which would normally give me (and everyone else) only 47 channels thru my analog tuner. However, with my 3575's digital tuner, I also receive, as a free bonus, 8 of the 9 HD QAM channels in my cableco's extra-cost lineup. The HD channels broadcast in 16:9 widescreen (WS), altho not all programs were produced in WS so they'll be "packaged" with black bars to fill up a 16:9 screen. For example, "Idol" is broadcast in natural HD WS but many commercials are still produced in 4:3 so they appear with bars.

See this post by user who tested a 3576 for possible use in a city-wide emergency response system for Los Angeles, which required the 3576 to tune 135 QAM CHANNELS from a variety of sources.
It passed his lab tests, as described here.
The 3575/76 or any new DVDR in North America will not be able to independently tune any scrambled channels. The only way to know how many unscrambled channels you'll be able to tune is to buy a DVDR and do a channel scan. Therefore, it pays to get a DVDR from a local Wal-Mart, Sams, Costco or other place where return is easy and assured.

As far as recording, the 3575/76 or other DVDR will be able to record any channel in-the-clear by connecting to the incoming coax. You can record any scrambled channels by a line connection (composite or S-Video) from the cableco's STB to an input on the 3575/76... the STB unscrambles the signal and delivers it to the 3575 for recording.

For one person's perspective on cableco digital (QAM) channel mapping in his area, see this post by Budget_HT.

Quote:
Note: "Switched Digital Video" Being Rolled Out by Cablecos

In the 2nd half of 2007, Comcast Cable started rolling out Switched Digital Video (SDV) which delivers digital channels only ON DEMAND from a subscriber. You have to have "equipment in the home" (their box?) to communicate with the "Optical Node" that delivers the channels in your neighborhood (500-2000 subscribers per node). According to people on this forum, the cablecos won't SDV ALL their channels, so just be aware of this emerging trend in case some of your perfectly tuned digital channels go away suddenly. If they do, call your cableco and see what's up!

wajo

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

FYI ...I have a Sharp Aquos LCD flatscreen that will turn on automatically when it detects a signal coming in. This is probably what's going on with the Visio. I believe you can disable this function in the menu somewhere. Also, I'll have to check if that function works only with HDMI, or if it works with any input on the monitor.

Mike Kow

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

Pics, Panels, Remote, Spare Parts, HDD Info, and Heat/EMI/CP Alert!

Heat/EMI/CP Alert

This alert was prompted by one user who bought two Philips EU DVDRs and had problems with stuttering, lockups, false copy-protection (CP), etc. Turns out he crammed his units into a narrow space, with NO air flow from the intake vents on the right-front side to the fan on the back. Then, to allow more air flow, he placed his 2nd unit on top of an old, large CRT TV which was apparently emitting strong electromagnetic interference (EMI).

Click here for details on a test by orsetto that duplicated the stated problems when a U.S. 3575 was placed on top of an old CRT TV.

Since CP works by "disrupting" the video stream, and EMI can do the same thing, some people might just be CP'ing themselves with EMI!? If you suspect CP in your signal, check also for sources of EMI in your system, like an old CRT TV too close to your DVDR!!!

Heat is the laser diode's worst enemy, and the HDD isn't too fond of it either and esp. doesn't like EMI! Many "odd" problems can occur if your DVDR gets too hot. The 3575/3576 intake air vents are on the top right side (facing unit), and the fan is on the back. Allow ample space for airflow.
  • Don't block right side or cram into narrow space.
  • Don't place unit on top of other hot components.
  • Don't use in a fully-enclosed entertainment center.
  • Don't place your DVDR on top of old CRT TV or even close... keep max. distance between them.
DVDR3575H/37 Pic (Black and Silver, Available New from Apr 2007-Present)



DVDR3576H/37 Pic (All Black, Available New from Apr 2008- ???)



Front Panel

Quote:
DV-IN jack (E3, 4-pin IEEE 1394/firewire) is for DV camera PLAY and RECORD.
USB 2.0 input jack is for JPG/WMA/MP3 PLAY ONLY.
No external HDDs for either input or output.


Back Panel



Remote NB526UD



Spare Parts

Here's Philips' web page for ordering spare parts for the 3575. Only spare part for the 3576 is the Remote.
Extra Remote Control NB526UD is only $7.60, limited stock... Same remote for both models... Remote stores want $25-35 for it.

Hard Disk Drive (HDD)

The stock HDD is a Seagate ST3160215ACE, 160GB, DB35 Series 7200.3 Ultra ATA/100.
General info page.

Dartman opened the case on one of his 3575's and tried a 250HB HDD he had on a Polaroid DRM-2001G (from WOOT), which didn't fire up as it did on the Polaroid w/o any special formatting or SW/tools. Here's a link to one of his posts with a little more info.

However, bonapart noted here that he upgraded a DVDR3455H/37B (prior model to the 3575) successfully with a 250GB HDD by loading a FW disc first before firing up the machine with the new drive. The latest FW disc for the 3575 is available from Philips here and the downloadable 3575 FW is here. DO NOT use in the 3576 since it prob. has a diff. FW version.

Dartman's pics of the HDD and box internals are shown below.



In checking the available Seagate HDD models in the same series... 80/160/250/320/400/500/750 GB... they all have the same dimensions except height. The 80 and 160 are 0.787 in. high, the 250 on up are 1.028 in. high. The higher-GB units also: (1) use slightly more power at 9.3 vs 5.7W at idle and 8.2 vs 5.0W ?consumer storage?; (2) have a 8MB cache instead of the 2MB cache in the original 160GB HDD; and (3) have more sectors, of course, for more capacity.

The remaining questions are: (1) will a replacement Seagate HDD in the same series fire up with the std FW disc installed, as bonapart indicated might happen (per link above); (2) if the HDD fires up, will the FW allow use of any extra space beyond the original 160GB; (3) will the 1.028 height fit where the 0.787 drive is; and (4) will the 3.2-3.6W higher power draw be a problem for the power supply?

Some stats on the HDD:
Power On to Ready from Standby = 16 sec
Nonrecoverable Read Errors per Bits Read = 1 sector per 10^14
No. of Sectors: >300 million
Annualized Failure Rate (AFR) = 0.68%
Contact Start-Stop Cycles = 50,000
Warranty = 5 years (to OEM, Philips?)
Interesting note: the HDD in the 3575 is capable of supporting 10 SDTV or HDTV video streams simultaneously (with cache). If someone could build a DVDR with 10 inputs and we had 10 sources of video and 10-stream FW, our modest little HDD could be a multitasking miracle!

wajo

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

Funny I should ask!

Back in November, I said something about the great PQ I was seeing even at longer rec modes from my downrezzed digital HD channels (analog is yuck in comparison), and wondered if Philips had developed a "different algorithm" for MPEG-2 encoding or something.

No one answered then, but just today, my question might have been answered in this article about who's doing what with DVD chips, part of which reads:

"The gap between them [Zoran/ESS and LSI/Philips] could widen further, as LSI Logic, whose MPEG encoding technology is already in its fifth generation, continues to hone its encoding skills, while Philips is adding to its new MPEG-2 codec optimized hardware blocks for running new picture improvement algorithms such as adaptive picture sharpness detection and de-blocking artifacts removal."

I think the 3575 might just have benefited from Philips' "new MPEG-2 codec" and "new picture improvement algorithms."

Ask and ye shall receive!?

wajo

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

Now that I have a unit whose disk door opens, I note a couple of oddities:

The first unit found digital channels on our analog/digital cable connection, but now the message is always that they're scrambled. I wonder whether the cable system (our hookup is bidirectional) noticed the previous attempts and closed some back door. (Scanning still stalls at digital 117, though.)

This unit replaces a Philips 75/17 that was getting flakey, and I was surprised to find that +RW disks (dozens of which we fed through the old machine) now require an initialization before recording on the new machine, and that disks with titles made on the 75/17 have to be made compatible before they can be recorded on or edited by the 3575. I thought that one advantage of the + format was that it didn't require formatting. The load time for a newly-inserted +RW disk, whether blank or with existing titles, also seems to be longer than on the 75/17.

I'm also puzzling over how to dub from previously-made +RWs to the HD--though mostly just to see exactly what this model can and can't do, so it's not a crucial issue. The reason is probably buried in some unexpected section of the user manual.

Other than some awkwardnesses in the remote and control sequences (inserting chapter marks seems to require more steps than the 75/17, for example), this looks like quite a nice recorder--having the HD for everyday time-shifting (90% of our use) is certainly convenient--and the picture quality is very good for our purposes (we're a long way from trading up to HD--our 24" Toshiba CRT is just fine).

Rletson

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rletson
Now that I have a unit whose disk door opens, I note a couple of oddities:

The first unit found digital channels on our analog/digital cable connection, but now the message is always that they're scrambled. I wonder whether the cable system (our hookup is bidirectional) noticed the previous attempts and closed some back door. (Scanning still stalls at digital 117, though.)

This unit replaces a Philips 75/17 that was getting flakey, and I was surprised to find that +RW disks (dozens of which we fed through the old machine) now require an initialization before recording on the new machine, and that disks with titles made on the 75/17 have to be made compatible before they can be recorded on or edited by the 3575. I thought that one advantage of the + format was that it didn't require formatting. The load time for a newly-inserted +RW disk, whether blank or with existing titles, also seems to be longer than on the 75/17.

I'm also puzzling over how to dub from previously-made +RWs to the HD--though mostly just to see exactly what this model can and can't do, so it's not a crucial issue. The reason is probably buried in some unexpected section of the user manual.

Other than some awkwardnesses in the remote and control sequences (inserting chapter marks seems to require more steps than the 75/17, for example), this looks like quite a nice recorder--having the HD for everyday time-shifting (90% of our use) is certainly convenient--and the picture quality is very good for our purposes (we're a long way from trading up to HD--our 24" Toshiba CRT is just fine).
Your newly Scrambled channels do sound "odd." I wonder if they're playin games, as you suggest, or if it could POSSIBLY be that your signal was flaky enough at that time to affect solid tunability... this is just a WAG, tho.

If you remember any digital channels you got before, see if it lets you do a Manual Channel Preset and add any of them? If they moved those channels, the 3575 won't find any that are in a major channel group (e.g., 83.1, 83.2, etc.) if the first channel (83.1) is Scrambled. You have to know there are unscrambled channels in the group (compare lineup to TV's), then add them manually. If you can find one "hidden" in a Scrambled group, adding that one unscrambled channel will tune all others in that group. See this post for "Hidden" channel discussion.

Hopefully, those other Philips +RW discs just require the "Make Recording Compatible" step as noted on pg 40 of the manual, and it just makes the title system compatible and allows additional recording. Try that first and see if it allows normal use of a +RW. Hope they don't require an Erase to be re-used in the 3575?

You copy DVDs in two ways, depending on whether they're Finalized or Unfinalized. The procedure is described at the bottom of this post.

wajo

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

I would like to know if i attach a external hd to the recorder is it possible to transfer the contents from the internal hd to the external?
Thanks

leetye62

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

Quote:
Originally Posted by leetye62
I would like to know if i attach a external hd to the recorder is it possible to transfer the contents from the internal hd to the external?
Thanks
No, there's nothing in the FW that would control that copy/transfer op., even if there were a connection type that would work. The USB port is for viewing jpegs etc. only.

wajo

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

Wabjxo, 3 questions about the 3575, that I think? are all no, but I thought I'd conferm with you.

1. Is it possible to record to the HDD and DVD at the same time, same channel to both drives?
2. Is it possible to delete/format to the DVD, while HDD is recording?
3. Is it possible to play both the DVD and HDD at the same time, just toggel between the 2 w/the HDD/DVD buttons?

If any of these are possible, I would like to know how to do it. I'm still on a learning curve with this unit. The only device I've had before with 2 recorders in one, was a Panny es-30 which had a VHS and DVDR in the same unit. And on that device I could independantly record/read from each drive, at the same time(note only one built in tuner, but with my external tuner I could record from 2 seperate channels at the same time). Note I'm not sure if Panny's with a HDD and DVDR would allow to record seperate things to the HDD and DVDR at the same time, since I've never had one before, it's not something that I would be doing that often, it's just more a question if it can be done on the 3575 or not. Thanks

jjeff

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

Quote:
Originally Posted by jjeff
Wabjxo, 3 questions about the 3575, that I think? are all no, but I thought I'd conferm with you.

1. Is it possible to record to the HDD and DVD at the same time, same channel to both drives?
2. Is it possible to delete/format to the DVD, while HDD is recording?
3. Is it possible to play both the DVD and HDD at the same time, just toggel between the 2 w/the HDD/DVD buttons?
That's No on #1 and #2, Yes on #3.

On #3, you can Play them both and when you toggle to either drive, it stops the drive you left in Resume mode, as it should... actually, pretty smart on this feature. If both drives kept playing, you'd MISS the portion on the other drive that kept playing. When you switch back and forth, you just press PLAY and each title starts from Resume, where you left off.

For multi-tasking, the Polaroid 2001G is king... see Nextoo's post here.

wajo

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

FYI: I've added a couple of sections to the subject titled "Recording and Dubbing to DVDs":

Recording to DVD in Multiple Sessions
(3rd heading.)

"Empty Title" Explained?
(Bottom of page.)

wajo

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

Thanks Wabjxo, at least you found 1 yes that I didnt know of. I guess it makes sense for Philips to "pause" the device, that is not being watched. Really makes sense for 99% of the time. But in the name of testing, I was trying to do a side by side PQ comparison between the same thing recorded on the HDD and DVD, and I was trying to toggel between the 2, to compare live shots. I guess this is the 1% of the time that it would have been OK to not pause the one being watched. Figures, I'd be in the 1%..........

Nice job updating your previous posts, clarified some things on the 3575. I also enjoyed the Looooonnnngggg link, talking about +R(W) format. I just wish now that I hadnt tried the first +R disc that I recorded to 4 yrs ago, on a 10 yr old Apex, which couldnt play it, so I thought -R was better. Sounds like there are indeed advantages to the +R format after all, but with the HDD, my disc usage will going down dramatically anyway!

P.S. If we/you and varify that "just being a commercial burned disc" not a home made disc with dye changes, stops the 3575 from recording from the DVD to HDD, you could omit the part about being CP'd. And say "no commercial disc". It would make more sense, to me anyway, knowing that there are indeed commercial discs, with out CP. Just a thought. Maby everybody else gets it.

Actually I think I answerd my own question. I was searching and found a post by KJBAWC that said, indeed his Pio, can tell the difference between a commercialy pressed disc and a finalized +-R disc. He said his Pio cannot copy a commercialy pressed disc, CP or not. I'm sure the 3575 is the same.

jjeff

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

Your humble servant, the Philips DVDR3575H, is a CES Innovations 2008 Awards Honoree in the Video Components category.

See CES Awards page here, 7th item down.

wajo

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

Quote:
Originally Posted by jjeff

Actually I think I answerd my own question. I was searching and found a post by KJBAWC that said, indeed his Pio, can tell the difference between a commercialy pressed disc and a finalized +-R disc. He said his Pio cannot copy a commercialy pressed disc, CP or not. I'm sure the 3575 is the same.
My Pio cannot make a high speed copy of a commercially pressed disc, but if there is no copy protection, I can easily make one in real-time, using the one touch copy function. As the Pio will let me make HS copies of +R and -R discs, using the "backup copy" function, but NOT commercially pressed discs, it must sense a difference, somehow!

kjbawc

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

Quote:
Originally Posted by kjbawc
it must sense a difference, somehow!
It might be that the commercial discs it can't HS copy are dual layer.

amesdp

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

Quote:
Originally Posted by jjeff
I was trying to do a side by side PQ comparison between the same thing recorded on the HDD and DVD
No point. The 3575 records exactly the same digital data stream to either HDD or DVD, depending on what recording quality level you have selected.

If you high-speed dub from HDD to DVD, it transfers the digital video data unchanged, preserving exactly the original recording quality.

amesdp

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

Yes, I found that out. Same program same speed recorded to HDD and DVD, produces exact same PQ. I was just testing this out.
And on the whole commercial copying thing, I think it was best described by Rcrach on VideoHelp. He said:

"It's a good guess. DVD's are encrypted with a protocol called CSS. The player decrypts them to view. A second level of copy protection from Macrovoision is inserted in the VBI of the analog signal. If your disk encouraged copying, it was probably meant to be copied from the analog output. ie they left out the Macrovision, this is easy. The DVR only looks for CSS when determining when to allow copying to the internal hard drive."

All just leave it at that. Makes the best sense to me. On the rare occasions I need to copy a commercial dvd w/o CP, I'll just feed the signal in from another DVD player. Not really a big deal.

jjeff

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

Quote:
Originally Posted by amesdp
It might be that the commercial discs it can't HS copy are dual layer.
Well, probably most commercial discs ARE DL, and it won't HS copy from a DL disc, but I have tried a few shorties, 1.5 hours or less, no features. So I am sure they have been SL discs, but they still wouldn't HS copy, with "disc backup."

kjbawc

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

Quote:
Originally Posted by kjbawc
Well, probably most commercial discs ARE DL, and it won't HS copy from a DL disc, but I have tried a few shorties, 1.5 hours or less, no features. So I am sure they have been SL discs, but they still wouldn't HS copy, with "disc backup."
Hmmm, I just ran across something about DVD-R and a "prerecorded crypto ring" near the hub. Hmmm!

wajo

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

Quote:
Originally Posted by wabjxo
Hmmm, I just ran across something about DVD-R and a "prerecorded crypto ring" near the hub. Hmmm!
Well, I read those articles, and they sound like so much hokum.

First, it clearly doesn't apply to the discussion here, since I have no trouble copying -R DVDs with my Pio. It is commercially pressed discs it won't copy. By the logic of this article, it would think the commercial disc is a +R disc, and I should be able to copy it, but that is not the case. Since a +R disc does not have this ring, but it will detect a +R disc, it must detect the noncommercial discs some other way.

Of the several hundred -R DVDs I have tried to copy, usually supplied by the authors of the content, there have been two or three that clearly had copy protection, and I could not copy them. Only a very small % of the DVDs I have tried to copy are +Rs, but I would say that at least a third of them have proved uncopyable on the Pio. But, I do not get a graphic saying they are copy protected, just that the disc is uncopyable. Of course, this may be a Pio bias for -Rs. But, at least from my standpoint, the +rs are far more likely to be "evil" than the -Rs.

The "-Rs are evil, +Rs are good" article says -Rs have disadvantages, but doesn't really say what they are, just that they cost more to produce, and "invade" our privacy. BS. The article implies that "Hollywood" has conspired to keep us from copying their content on -R discs with this inner ring. Again, that is total BS. I have hundreds of DVDs to prove it...

kjbawc

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

1. How do you receive your TV signal?
Antenna with rotor. I get 14 digital stations plus the old analog.

2. What is your TV type, model, etc.

Toshiba Regza 32HL67U (I think that is the model)

3. What HDMI cable are you using (from where, etc.)?
HDMI from the unit to the HDMI # 2 on the TV. Have no idea what kind. Picked it up at the future shop for 50 bucks.

4. On PQ, are you referring to ALL channels, or only analog channels?

The analog channels are fine. It is only the digital channels (live or recorded) that are dark. And, as mentioned, I have now determined that the picture is much better (contrast) if I use S-Video.

5. What aspect do you set your TV for watching analog 4:3 channels?

I leave it at 16:9. I don’t watch analog unless I have to (Two Canadian Stations….boy are we behind over here).


On a side note, I noticed another little nuance of the unit last night. It comes on randomly in the middle of the night. Possibly this is the clock updating but I’m not sure. Anyone else have this happen?

Timoty

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

Yes, we've seen our 3575's turn on briefly, apparently for the twice-per-day clock update. We've now got them set manually with DST off. They don't turn on anymore.

Sometimes, one of my units won't turn off after a timer rec. In the morning after a timer rec, we'll see it still on and I haven't found a setting that could be influencing this. Happens maybe once a month or so, maybe less often?

wajo

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

Quote:
Originally Posted by Timoty
...On a side note, I noticed another little nuance of the unit last night. It comes on randomly in the middle of the night. Possibly this is the clock updating but Iím not sure. Anyone else have this happen?
The unit powers up at noon and again at midnight
to set the clock (actually at 11:59 and 23:59).

Chuck44

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

OK....so it is not possessed. That is good to know.
I have to say that I am much more pleased with the unit now that I have it going through S-Video. Not the quality that I get with my PC, but a little more user friendly for the wife. The PC with MEdia Center is fluky anyway with HD content. After a fast forward or rewind it takes up to 30 seconds to get going again which is annoying.

Now if I can find a way to play movies of of my Terabyte USB hard Drive I'd be a real happy camper....any idea?

Timoty

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

Quote:
Originally Posted by Timoty
OK, kindof over my head but I get the jist of what you are talking about. Bottom line, is there any way to fix this?

For the record, I switched over to S-Video tonight and it was much better. The picture is noticeably lighter and there was really no loss in quality. However, it seems ridiculous to finally have HDMI and not even be able to use it.
Not everything needs or will benefit from HDMI, so don't think you have to use it just because it's there. My personal bias says, save the HDMI connection for a component that is actually designed to use it from scratch (like a BluRay player or an OPPO 981HD) and not for a component where it was put in as a marketing afterthought (all DVD recorders and sub-$100 players).

Kelson

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

Quote:
Originally Posted by Timoty
OK....so it is not possessed. That is good to know.
I have to say that I am much more pleased with the unit now that I have it going through S-Video. Not the quality that I get with my PC, but a little more user friendly for the wife. The PC with MEdia Center is fluky anyway with HD content. After a fast forward or rewind it takes up to 30 seconds to get going again which is annoying.

Now if I can find a way to play movies of of my Terabyte USB hard Drive I'd be a real happy camper....any idea?
Look up media servers or media players. These are essentially video appliance boxes with big HDD's that store your video content (i.e. ripped DVD's as video or .ISO files) and plug into your TV for playback. Some models come with USB ports for expanded storage and some models come without HDD so you can buy and install your own with a size of your choosing.

Kelson

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

Thing is, I wonder if there is a way to get movies to play through the USB on the DVDR3575H/37. Someone somewhere smarter than me is going to come up with a firware to do this. I have to bellieve that. If it can play MP3's and Jpegs off of a USB, I'm, sure that it has the "potential" to play video files off of a USB. If not DVD folders at least xvid and Divx files.

Timoty

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

Quote:
Originally Posted by wajo
Yes, we've seen our 3575's turn on briefly, apparently for the twice-per-day clock update. We've now got them set manually with DST off. They don't turn on anymore.
Sometimes, one of my units won't turn off after a timer rec. In the morning after a timer rec, we'll see it still on and I haven't found a setting that could be influencing this. Happens maybe once a month or so, maybe less often
Mine also won't turn off after a timer record every once and awhile.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Timoty
I have to say that I am much more pleased with the unit now that I have it going through S-Video....
Admittedly, it never occurred to me to try the s-video connection from the 3575 with both the HDMI and component available. I tried it briefly this morning and noticed I could get a much brighter picture with better shadow detail.
I read amesdp's response (#418) on the previous page and understand the differences, but it's still somewhat puzzling to me why I can't get the same quality from my HDMI or component connections. Perhaps it has to do with the picture adjustment range for the s-video input of my TV being different from the other inputs, at least in regards to what the TV is "expecting". Or perhaps it's that I'm calibrating the TV with a disc, and so the video data is "raw" and not being processed by the tuner, which means that the disc-based settings don't correspond well to the "recorded" video.

chrisb0

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

Timoty, I guess the European equivalent can do just as you want. I believe it is copyright holders that is stopping ours from the same feature. Don't get Burntpixzl started on USB movies....

jjeff

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

Well then. We just need to get a hold of that European equivalent firmware and adapt it into the North American Firmware. Any good coders around here!

Timoty

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

Quote:
Originally Posted by Timoty
2. What is your TV type, model, etc.
Toshiba Regza 32HL67U (I think that is the model)
4. On PQ, are you referring to ALL channels, or only analog channels?
The analog channels are fine. It is only the digital channels (live or recorded) that are dark. And, as mentioned, I have now determined that the picture is much better (contrast) if I use S-Video.
I'd like to figure this "dark pic" thing out since several people have complained about the same thing.

I looked at some specs on your Toshiba display and noticed two things that *might" be interesting:

1. It's a 768p display. I'm wondering if others with the "dark pic" also have a 768p display. I don't have any darkness on my 1080p display, so just wondering if the "odd" res has any effect. Wondering if the format you send to it is critical, like is it better to send 720p (closer but not identical) or 480p like I do and let the display scale it up???

2. Here's a description of the display's Dynalight backlight control that leads to some questions:

"DynaLight Dynamic Backlight Control monitors the brightness level of each video frame, and automatically adjusts the backlight intensity based on the image content. Precise signal analysis affords 256 levels of backlight intensity. This creates dynamic contrast up to 5 times that of the original panel contrast, resulting in a deeper black level that increases detail and depth, even in low light environments."

This makes me wonder if that is having a "darkening effect" and maybe it can be turned "down" or even "off" to see the result. My Vizio has a similar feature and it's very possible to backlight the pic to death so it's so dark... Maybe there's some "incompatibility" with the 3575 sending a BRIGHT signal, like you see with S-Video, and the Toshiba display is trying to CONTROL the brightness too much??

This is even more intriguing since your dark pic is on digital channels only, which are more densely "packed" than analog channels, i.e., more pixels to start with, which if not handled properly could lead to a dark pic from too-dense a feed for the setting to decipher and control properly? WOW, WTH am I talking about!?

Maybe these are just some interesting questions that could be explored???

wajo

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

For what it is worth wajo I tried the HDMI using every setting. I rolled through 480, 720, and 1880 with the HDM buton (2nd down on the top left) and it didn't have any effect on the darkness. In fact I think I tried every combination of settings to no avail. I can crank up the brightness and play with the contrast but all I end up getting is a washed out dark and colours with brighter darkness =-)
It would be interesting though, as you suggested, to see if everyone who has this problem has a 720 max resolution. So I pose the question:
To those that are having the 'darkness' problem, what is the model of your TV. Lets help wojo, our resident expert, help us figure this thing out so that we can tell Philips how to fix their product =-)

Timoty

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

I had it on my 768 plasma with both the Philips and the Magnavox.

But I also had it on my 32" analog set. This was using s-video on both. But the dark tendency wasn't so bad that it really bothered me that much - it was the lack of detail and soft, "waxy" look that I couldn't handle.

That part was fine on the 32" analog Sanyo, but was totally unacceptable on the 50" Elite.

Rammitinski

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

I had the darkness on my 32" 720p(768) LCD Panny. I just used the HDMI. I could crank the brightness up almost all the way and make it quite viewable, but what bothered me most was if I tried the disc on another machine or TV I would have to do the same to that TV. It was recorded dark on the DVD. That was no good.
I also did not have quite the resolution, even on SP that I have come accustom to. Note it wasn't bad by any stretch, just not "like" my Panny's, which are my baseline.
I found 480p output was the best in my case, and maybe S would have been better than HDMI, just didn't try it at the time.
My father doesn't seem to notice any darkness problem on his 20" Vizio 720p LCD. He is running via component cables(actually just audio cables, yellow, red, white), since he's too cheap to buy the HDMI cable Maybe he's better off because of it.

jjeff

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

My darkness issues are on a 768 panny plasma.

chrisb0

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

You may be on to something Wajo since 720 seems to be a somewhat common denominator. I know you mentioned it above, but what would that particular resolution have to do with it?

Timoty

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

It's the "768" that might have somnething to do with dark pic. Have to wait for some more people to post, and hope they read their specs cuz even yours showed it was "720p" then ("768") in parentheses. So, some or maybe all 768p mfgrs might advertise their displays as "720p" and that leads me to believe/suspect a motive, maybe more than just "marketing"???

wajo

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

"720p" is/was a stop-gap resolution while the technology caught up with the demands of making a full 1080p HD display panel (1920x1080 native resolution). The "720p" designation is a misnomer. It refers to the panel being able to accept and display a 720p signal. Typically for plasma the native resolution of a 720p panel is actually 1024x768 (not 1280x720). LCD 720p 16:9 panels are typically 1366 x 768 native resolution. In all these panels the TV must rescale and remap the input video to the displays native resolution while keeping the aspect ratio at 16:9.

It's only recently that full 1080x1920 native resolution panels have arrived in both LCD and Plasma. These are designated "1080p" TV's. A TV designated "1080i" is typically not 1080x1920 native resolution (generally 1024x1080 and 1280x1080) so read the specs carefully. Panasonics plasma line is almost entirely 1080p.

Kelson

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

I have a Panasonic 768p plasma. My TV source is an external HD satellite receiver connected to the TV via HDMI and the Philips 3575 via S-Video. My standard TV picture settings are calibrated for correct appearance on the sat receiver HDMI input. The sat receiver does not have an option to produce enhanced black level. My Philips 3575 is connected to the TV via a 2nd HDMI input and via component.

The appearance of the Philips playing back recorded programs compared to the original direct HDMI input from the sat receiver, same picture settings on the TV:
HDMI / RGB Standard - same
HDMI / RGB Enhanced - too dark
HDMI / YCbCr - same
Component - same

This is exactly as expected.

Note that this is comparing playback (or pass-through) to the original input from the sat receiver.
However, DVD playback on the 3575 is slightly too dark by comparision.

amesdp

Philips DVDR3575H 37 and DVDR3576H 37 Features Setup and Operation

Yes Kelson is right. Many times people refer to their screens as 720p, while if actually look in small print on the box, or in the manual you will see "Native screen resolution, 768"
Not sure about Vizio's? Later I can check my the manual of my 20" Vizio which is just like my fathers to see if it is 720 or 768 native resolution.

Edit: Vizio native screen resolution is 1366X768

jjeff

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