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Question Official Stewart Film Screen thread. ( AVS Forum Screens )
Updated: 2008-05-16 15:32:59 (1280)
Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

Post all your questions and answers related to Stewart to this thread.
Please, no sales or marketing. It will be removed.

Answers: Official Stewart Film Screen thread. ( AVS Forum Screens )
Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

Quote:
Originally Posted by specs68
I pulled my old screen down yesterday and am ready to roll it up. What is the correct way... with the screen material on the inside or outside. I'm thinking the screen material should be on the outside but don't want to screw it up. Thanks.
If you have the paper and foam: Foam goes on the floor first, then paper at either end overhanging beyond the length of the foam. Then the screen lays on top of that face up. Roll from one end carefully, not to make creases as you roll. It may help to have someone tug it slightly at opposite end to keep taught as you roll.

Carey P

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

Like the two folks above, you want to viewable side facing up when you roll it up. In my opinion, on TOP of the viewable side you also want the butcher paper. I had a screen where that layer of paper on top of the viewable side was missing and there are some some discolorations where the snaps were touching the screen surface. A layer of paper on the screen surface would have prevented that.

nathan_h

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

I just switched to the Firehawk G3. A quick question on calibration. For the brightness setting, I could not see any of the black bars on any setting using GetGray. Is this normal, or what am I missing? I just left it on the settings for my old screen.

cal87

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

hi guys
i have a question cause i?m not sure which fabric to choose

my PJ will be the Sony VW60, anamorphic lens Isco III for 2,35:1 projection on a curved screen cause of the pincushion

screen size will be aprox. 40*92 (roughly, will decide when i got both parts, then order the screen)

ambient light can be controlled to 100%

i would like to know your suggestions which material to choose, grayhawk (0.95 gain) Firehawk (1.35 gain) or Studiotek (1.3 gain)

thx in advance

Edit: the rest of the room (walls, ceiling) is pretty much all black, so no reflection light
PJ is not ceiling mounted, it is pretty much @ the screen center in every direction

Theron2

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

Quote:
Originally Posted by cal87
I just switched to the Firehawk G3. A quick question on calibration. For the brightness setting, I could not see any of the black bars on any setting using GetGray. Is this normal, or what am I missing? I just left it on the settings for my old screen.
Though it would be odd for there to be a big change, approach the calibration from a clean slate. What you want to see in terms of blacker-than-black, etc., is the same end result you would want to see with any other screen.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Theron2
hi guys
i have a question cause i?m not sure which fabric to choose

my PJ will be the Sony VW60, lens Isco III and i want a curved screen cause of the pincushion

screen size will be aprox. 40*92 (roughly, will decide when i got both parts, then order the screen)

ambient light can be controlled to about 90%

i would like to know your suggestions which material to choose, grayhawk (0.95 gain Firehawk (1.35 gain) or Studiotek (1.3 gain)

thx in advance
I'd definitely go with the Firehawk, since you have some ambient light. I'm assuming that since you have some ambient light you probably also don't have very dark ceiling, floor, and walls, which is another reason to go with the Firehawk.

Mitigating factors will be how wide the seating area is (very wide is not very good) and whether the projector is ceiling mounted (ideally, yes).

nathan_h

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

i just edited the 1. post,PJ is not ceiling mounted, the ambient light would be through the window covers but minimal, but i might install a perfect dark solution, the walls and ceiling are very dark almost black, so lets assume i have 100% light control and completley dark walls, what should i go for with the VW60?

Theron2

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Theron2
hi guys
i have a question cause i?m not sure which fabric to choose

my PJ will be the Sony VW60, lens Isco III and i want a curved screen cause of the pincushion

screen size will be aprox. 40*92 (roughly, will decide when i got both parts, then order the screen)

ambient light can be controlled to about 90%

i would like to know your suggestions which material to choose, grayhawk (0.95 gain Firehawk (1.35 gain) or Studiotek (1.3 gain)

thx in advance

Edit: the rest of the room (walls, ceiling) is pretty much all black btw so no reflection light
PF is not ceiling mounted, it is pretty much @ the screen center in every direction
I have the VW60 as well. I'm at 110" screen with the projector at about 12' away, ceiling mounted.

You don't need a curved screen at that size, the VW60 will do just fine. Not until you get a lot wider (like 120") and 2.35:1 do you need to consider a curved screen.

And you should get the FHG3. Good match for the projector (improved contrast/blacks), and works really well with some ambient light.

AbMagFab

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

i edited my post a 2nd time lol, it wasn?t really obvious but i want a 2,35:1 setup with an anamorphic lens and a curved screen because of the lens-introduced pincussion
lets assume i have a completly dark room

Theron2

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Theron2
i edited my post a 2nd time lol, it wasn?t really obvious but i want a 2,35:1 setup with an anamorphic lens and a curved screen because of the lens-introduced pincussion
lets assume i have a completly dark room
Again, at that width, I don't think you really need to worry about pincushion effects. At 92", that's well within the edges of what the lens can handle, even at a high zoom (short throw).

AbMagFab

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

I would agree - a curved screen for your application is not necessary. Unless you want it purely for aesthetic reasons - they do look cool- I'd stick with a flat screen. The slight pincushion (probably around 1/4" or so) can just be overscanned onto the frame.

Firehawk G3 would be the best material for your room, assuming your lens to screen distance is at least 1.6x the screen width. This would be about 12'-3" for your 92" width screen.

If you have a shorter throw than this, you may start to see hot spotting with the FireHawk G3. For short throws down to 1.4x screen width, you would need something like the Firehawk SST or GrayHawk.

Marc Rumsey

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

At what point does pincushion and chromatic abberation become a problem? I've got a Sony Pearl at 14' back from a 120inch WIDE 2.35:1 screen, and I'm using the zoom method because it is a flat screen and I cannot stand pincushion and fringing, etc.

nathan_h

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

thx for the info

Theron2

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

I replaced my Sanyo Z5 with the Z2000 and currently have a 84" Graywolf II screen. The black levels and ambient light rejection are good, however, the texture on the screen can be distracting at times.

Here are some details about my room:

Ambient light controlled
10' wide
6.5' screen height
13.5' seating distance
13' throw distance
4' projection height
projector is shelf mounted 2.5' from the center of the screen

I've skimmed through this thread and it seems that the Firehawk G3 would be a good choice. I was thinking 92" would be a good size. The only concern I have is the viewing angle. I know that ceiling mounting is better for angular reflective screens. Is this something I should be concerned about? Is there anything else I need to consider?

Thanks in advance.

jeffy1021

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jeffy1021
I replaced my Sanyo Z5 with the Z2000 and currently have a 84" Graywolf II screen. The black levels and ambient light rejection are good, however, the texture on the screen can be distracting at times.

Here are some details about my room:

Ambient light controlled
10' wide
6.5' screen height
13.5' seating distance
13' throw distance
4' projection height
projector is shelf mounted 2.5' from the center of the screen

I've skimmed through this thread and it seems that the Firehawk G3 would be a good choice. I was thinking 92" would be a good size. The only concern I have is the viewing angle. I know that ceiling mounting is better for angular reflective screens. Is this something I should be concerned about? Is there anything else I need to consider?

Thanks in advance.
Not sure what you mean by 6.5' screen height?

The only issue in what you describe would be the projector location, as you mention. You could get some hotspotting. Also, you say 2.5' from the center of the screen - I assume you mean vertically, and not horizontally?

Other than that, I'd say you could go wtih a bigger screen that 92" diagonal. At all those distances, I would say 100" or 110".

AbMagFab

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

Thanks for the response.

6.5' is the distance to the top of the screen.

The projector is also offset horizontally by about 2-2.5' from the screen center. However, this arrangement will change when I move, but I'm looking for a screen that will last me indefinitely.

Also, thanks for the recommendation about going 100" - 110". I'll definitely look into that.

jeffy1021

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jeffy1021
I replaced my Sanyo Z5 with the Z2000 and currently have a 84" Graywolf II screen. The black levels and ambient light rejection are good, however, the texture on the screen can be distracting at times.
The Firehawk G3 texture was distracting to me too, that was a main reason I switched to the ST130 G3.

Carey P

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

The G3? Are you sure? They significantly improved the G3.

For what it's worth, I have a FHG3 and the screen disappears. And I prefer it over the ST for improved blacks/contrast, and tolerance to ambient light.

Not sure how you'll handle the horizontal offset.

AbMagFab

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Carey P
The Firehawk G3 texture was distracting to me too, that was a main reason I switched to the ST130 G3.
Thanks for the reply.

I've seen a sample of the FH G3 and it's definitely better than the GWII I currently have in terms of texture. I do use my projector for some TV watching with ambient light, so I think I would be better off with the FH G3?

jeffy1021

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

Quote:
Originally Posted by AbMagFab
The G3? Are you sure? They significantly improved the G3.
Yes, it was only in the whitest highlights, but enough to bother me. I've heard this from others too, so it's not just me. A sparkly sort of effect, due to the higher percentage of reflective layers used. Maybe just a matter of tolerance and how close you sit to the screen. I don't know.

Carey P

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

Quote:
Originally Posted by AbMagFab
The G3? Are you sure? They significantly improved the G3.

For what it's worth, I have a FHG3 and the screen disappears. And I prefer it over the ST for improved blacks/contrast, and tolerance to ambient light.

Not sure how you'll handle the horizontal offset.
How big is your screen and how far away do you sit? Also, what is your projection distance?

With my current setup, the screen is slightly brighter depending on where I sit due to the horizontal offset. My setup with definitely change once I move so I've just been dealing with it for the time being knowing that this problem will go away later.

jeffy1021

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

One poster was talking about the Optoma Graywolf, and another about the Stewart Firehawk G3. Two very different screens. I tried a Graywolf for a week and found the screen pattern more distracting than anything I have seen from Stewart.

nathan_h

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

Hi there, I'd like some help re the screen material I need. Tried a couple of local dealers and received different answers.

I'd like an electric (Model A?) 2.35 aspect ratio screen 126" wide x 54" tall. I have the JVC RS2 projector (600 Ansi lumens). My room is not dedicated, but ambient light is 100% controlled, and I've managed to convince my wife to have dark walls and ceiling The ceiling is 7' 10" high, and the projector will be mounted on the ceiling. The room is 23' long (sitting around 16-20') by 18' wide.

I've always heard wonders about the Studiotek130 as the reference screen for this type of 1080p projectors. However the local dealer tells me that Studiotek has size limitations and cannot use it on a 126" x 54" screen. Is this right?

The material that was suggested to me by my local dealer is Ultramatte130, with halfgain at 42 degrees vs 68 in the Studiotek130. Another dealer suggested the FirehawkG3 but I guess this would work better when there is ambient light.

Any views on the size limitation of the Studiotek130 or the right material for my set up will be highly appreciated since I have to order it very soon...

cortega

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

It's not the Studiotek. It's the Model A. You can't go wider than 122".

http://www.stewartfilmscreen.com/VISIONARY.htm

I'm not sure that you can get a 2.35 electric screen either.

Steve Dodds

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

Thank you Steve,

you are right that in Stewart's webpage it seems that the "Visionary" is the one that can not exceed 122". However in the "Model A" page I have not seen those limitations.

I also got a quote from Stewart for a "Luxus Model A 'Classic' Electriscreen" for a 126" wide screen in the 2.36 aspect ratio. However it was with the Ultramatte130 material, thus my question on the Studiotek130...

cortega

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

Cortega,

Since you are going to ceiling mount your screen, the model should not be an issue. The Model A and Model A Classic are very similar. Although if you are going to go with the Model A Classic, i would highly suggest you use the Dr. Brackets, it makes installs a lot easier.

If you want to use Studiotek 130 G3 you are going to be limited to an image size of 50.25" x 118". Because of the height of the image (assuming you go with the standard 12" of blackdrop) Stewart might be able to customize the screen and shorten the side masking by 1" on each side to give you two additional inches on the image width....but that will be something totally custom.

If you have to go with the image size of 53.5" x 126", Ultramatte 130 will be your best option. Firehawk G3 and Studiotek 130 G3 both have the same limitations.

Please keep in mind that this is the case for retractable screens only. Fixed screens allow you to have a larger image size with FHG3 and ST13G3 because less material is required to get a certain image size.

-benito

benitoj

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

hey guys i?d like to ask what?s the difference between the Firehawk G3 and SST?
i think i know the SST is somehow optimized for D-Ila PJs like Sony VW60, if that?s correct in what way are they optimized? smoother texture different gain...
what?s the difference between them and Grayhawk which also claims to be optimized for D-Ilas or am i mixing something up here?

thx in advance

Theron2

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Theron2
hey guys i?d like to ask what?s the difference between the Firehawk G3 and SST?
i think i know the SST is somehow optimized for D-Ila PJs like Sony VW60, if that?s correct in what way are they optimized? smoother texture different gain...
what?s the difference between them and Grayhawk which also claims to be optimized for D-Ilas or am i mixing something up here?

thx in advance
I think the SST is designed for shorter throws, but you give up a little as well, I think in gain.

If you're projector will be 12' or more back (depending on screen size), you want the FHG3. I think the Greyhawk is an older version, but it never seems to be recommended anymore.

AbMagFab

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

Benito,

thank you for your informative reply. Obviously I wasn't aware of these size limitations. Do you happen to know the rationale of a limit on the height of the Studiotek130, and why this doesn't apply to the Ultramatte130?

In your view, is the Ultramatte130 also good for the new digital 1080p projectors like my JVC RS2?

Thanks!

cortega

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

Although not a newbie in many areas when I clicked over into the projector/screen forums I am in the deep end treading water!

I have decided on the IN76 for my projector.

It will be ceiling mounted between 10' -11' feet away from the screen. I think this is the recommended throw distance for this projector.

My viewing distance is 10' feet. I would like a 92" screen

It will be in my basement where light can be controlled but I would like my recessed lighting on in areas as people gather around the bar and I can have sports on the screen.

After reading this thread I think the FireHawk G2 might be the screen for such an area but I hope you can’t see the screen through the source like one person pointed out.

Also, it was mentioned with the studio tek? (I think) that when the person stood up the screen got brighter? I would prefer consistency from center to left and right. My off center viewing is small. In other words I have a sectional that does not extend to far past center. However, off center viewing would be great for people standing by the bar or hanging out around the room.

Please recommend a screen for this application.

Thanks!

drober30

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

What size image are you specifying? Where is the bar lighting in relationship to the screen, and can all the other zones be extinguished? Firehawk is definitely a candidate but so could Grayhawk RS, but that would be tougher to light. The Grayhawk is a bit better at disappering. The use of Studiotek would be unlikely to succeed in conjunction with the bar lighting.

The idea of the gain changing a lot when a viewer stands, would be a phenomenon of a really short throw setup, with a lot of vertical shift, and sounds like a common scenario which applies to retro-reflective fabrics a bit more than angular reflective fabrics.

My preference is in general to favor the longer throw option within your room constraints, as this will normalize various angles, reducing hot spot artifacts and widening the available viewing cone for all 2nd choice seating locations in the room.

Thanks for considering Stewart Filmscreen!

m Robinson

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

I'm planning on getting a new Luxus Deluxe screen for my theatre.

Source is a Mitsubishi HC3 (1300 lumens) ceiling mounted 13' from the front wall.

I'm sitting almost directly under the projector.

The room is 16 ft wide and 18 ft front to back, 8ft ceilings.

Some ambient light from a hallway during the day. I can make it pitch black if I close the door.

I'd like a 1.78:1 format screen but don't know what material is best suited for my configuration. Also what size would work best? I'm thinking 100", is 110" too big?

Thanks,
Vernon

vhuang

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

For what it's worth, I'm sitting 14'5" away with a 123" Firehawk and couldn't be happier! I'm using an Infocus IN76 and it is perfectly suited to the Firehawk's 1.25 gain material. Still best to watch during the evening hours and control the light though - but that's obvious. G'luck!

Mitch P.

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

Does anyone know how well a Stewart Videomatte 200 MicroPerf screen would work with the Ruby? I'm interested in a higher gain THX screen.
Pro's/Con's?

Brad/Viper-Fan

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

I've got a Ruby in house right now. There is no moire at any size. I plan to test the lumen output over the range of the zoom lens, this week and see what sort of impact various throw distances will have. Ultramatte 200 is an excellent screen. I would recommend generally that longer throws work better with it, for minimization of hot-spot problems. One must also control ambient lighting to a higher degree in comparison with Firehawk.

m Robinson

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

Ultramatte 200 is an excellent screen. I would recommend generally that longer throws work better with it, for minimization of hot-spot problems. One must also control ambient lighting to a higher degree in comparison with Firehawk.[/quote]

Mark,

I was refering to the Videomatte 200 but since you mentioned it, what is the difference between the Videomatte 200 and the Ultramatte 200?

Also since the viewing cone is close to the Firehawk G2 (26deg. vs 24deg.) wouldn't these white screens reject ambient light much better than a Studiotek 130? I know gray rejects better than white but doesn't the viewing cone also help this?

I would like not to have a gray screen if possible since I like colors better on a white screen. But my room does have light colored walls.

Brad/Viper-Fan

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

The UM-200 and Videomatte are pretty similar in gain, but UM-200 is available in larger sizes. Videomatte, years ago had a gain factor of 2.2 but we lowered the gain as projectors improved.

As far as relative performance in ambient light, the higher gain fabrics will get you brighter rendition at the top of the dynamic range, so yes to a degree, the dark areas of image content are relatively darker. The difference is no where near the difference when a neutral density gray screen is used.

Remember that in ambient light, the cumulative light falling on the screen surface, from openings, or from cross reflected projection light, is the color black as you will see it, for all intents and purposes. Look at the screen as the projector warms up or in a fade to black, that is your system "black".

In high ambient light it will be a white color or muted non reflective white. Then we add collimated projected light above that level, to whatever level the output of the projector allows, of course multiplied by the relative gain factor. With a bright projector, you can get some dynamic range from "black"(actually dull white) to white, (brilliantly illuminated screen surface). But with a gray screen you get way blacker from the bottom of the range, and if the material is engineered to respond to collimated projected light, and is less responsive to light coming from less perpendicular angles, then black is much deeper.

The trade off is at the top of the dynamic range. It is possible to overhaul the gray tint of a screen with projected light power and get a calibrated white field. People argue this to death. It is done. A sample pasted on a whiter wall is not indicative of the performance of the screen, since cross reflection from the base material is still washing everything out. And granted you must have a more powerful projector to light a Grayhawk RS, than what is needed for a given foot Lambert performace level with a white screen. But if proper set-up is followed, an accurate picture is obtainable with either.

Firehawk is pretty good at rendering a believable white and providing blacks where other fabrics just cannot. It not as textbook white field accurate, but it makes projectors with reduced black level performance look much better, and salvages many rooms which otherwise wash out to unacceptable degrees. Images are believable and that is why people create Home Theatres.

Naturally it would be wonderful if all viewing environments were black floored, had black ceilings and walls, and so forth. It would also be nice if digital engines could acutally render a black field where IRE=0 was pitch black, few to none can. Gray screens help with both of these issues.

m Robinson

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

Thanks Mark,

Hows your testing of the Ruby coming along?

Brad/Viper-Fan

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

I've decided to buy a Ruby projector, mainly because of the RBE on DLP. My room dimensions are 21L x17Wx9H and is dedicated to home theater. I will be sitting 15-18 feet from the screen. I can control the light in the room and make it so I can't see my hand in front of my face, though I will not always view in complete darkness. I'm considering a Stewart Firehawk G2 deluxe screen wall, but I can't decide on the screen size. I've narrowed it down to 123" or 135" 16:9. Given the Ruby projector and given the room dimensions, which size should I go with? The projector will be ceiling mounted.



Bruce

bpowers

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bpowers
I've decided to buy a Ruby projector, mainly because of the RBE on DLP. My room dimensions are 21L x17Wx9H and is dedicated to home theater. I will be sitting 15-18 feet from the screen. I can control the light in the room and make it so I can't see my hand in front of my face, though I will not always view in complete darkness. I'm considering a Stewart Firehawk G2 deluxe screen wall, but I can't decide on the screen size. I've narrowed it down to 123" or 135" 16:9. Given the Ruby projector and given the room dimensions, which size should I go with? The projector will be ceiling mounted.


Bruce
Are you having risers built? I would not suggest any higher then the 123, 110 might even be more prefereable. Besides the feeling of being to close to a screen that could be to large you also want to consider by the screen size how high off the floor the screen will be mounted. The larger the screen the lower the front of the screen will be towards the floor making it harder for say a second row to see the whole screen.

TomsHT

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

Thanks for the reply.

I will not add risers, the room will have the appearance of a comfy family room as opposed to a theater (beanbags, couch, etc). How high off the floor the screen is mounted is important in that I want my center channel to be correctly positioned with the two main speakers which will be relatively tall( Vienna Acoustics Strauss). What is minimum/optimal distance from the ceiling to the top the screen?

bpowers

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

Hey Mark (or anyone else).

I am setting up a new system in my basement.

Projector will be an Epson Pro 800 with a 92" diagonal 16:9 motorized Firehawk.

The situation I am concerned with is the heighth of the screen.

My ceiling will be just over 7'.

However I was wondering about recessing the screen into the ceiling. If I recess it about 6-8 inches, I will have actual viewing screen 6-8 inches from the ceiling and about 28 inches from the floor.

The ceiling now is constructed of 12" joists, so there is plenty of room above to mount.

This will give me room for my built in LCR below the screen.

Is this doable, or am I missing something?

dannynoonan

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

You are not "locked in" to any specific amount of black-drop, when you order a Stewart Screen, so adding (or subtracting) a bit of drop to suit your situation, is as easy as asking your dealer.

m Robinson

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

Hi Mark,

I purchased a Studiotek 123" and a Ruby projector today. If I've read everything in this forum correctly, in a light controlled room, the Studiotek screen is a "better" option, correct? My room dimensions are printed above.

My other choice was a Firehawk G2, but I was worried about colors not beng as saturated as they should with a grey screen. It seems that the high contrast ratio of the Ruby should produce much more satisfying black levels than did past projectors. This should create less of a need for a darker Grey screen in a light controlled room(?)

Also, given the many comments concerning the drop off of Ansi Lumens with a $1,000 400W Zenon bulb, I was concerned that not having a bright enough screen would be problematic after 400hrs with the Ruby and I wouldn't see as much picture detail in shadows.

Lastly, I have not seen the Ruby paired with a Firehawk, but I did see the Ruby with a Studiotek. The room was light controlled, but I though the picture was fine even with the light's in the room dimmed as opposed to pitch black.

Any additional opinions Mark? This is my first projector system and I want to be sure I'm heading in the right direction

bpowers

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

Can anyone here give me some insights about how the different Stewart screen materials compare regarding sharpness and color punch. I will go with a Stewart Screenwall Deluxe and was thinking about Studiotek 130 vs. Ultramatte 150. Projector: The upcoming 1080p Optoma H81. 10 feet wide. Room completely light controlled with black walls/ceiling. I appreciate Studioteks color accuracy and "sharpness"/well defined details above all BUT I was asking myself how e.g. the Ultramatte 150 would compare - other than the slightly higher gain - when it comes specifically to "sharpness" and color fidelity/color punch? I would take more vibrant colors over absolute accuracy!

Any help is greatly appreciated. Thanks.

TheLion

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bpowers
Hi Mark,

I purchased a Studiotek 123" and a Ruby projector today. If I've read everything in this forum correctly, in a light controlled room, the Studiotek screen is a "better" option, correct? My room dimensions are printed above.

My other choice was a Firehawk G2, but I was worried about colors not beng as saturated as they should with a grey screen. It seems that the high contrast ratio of the Ruby should produce much more satisfying black levels than did past projectors. This should create less of a need for a darker Grey screen in a light controlled room(?)

Also, given the many comments concerning the drop off of Ansi Lumens with a $1,000 400W Zenon bulb, I was concerned that not having a bright enough screen would be problematic after 400hrs with the Ruby and I wouldn't see as much picture detail in shadows.

Lastly, I have not seen the Ruby paired with a Firehawk, but I did see the Ruby with a Studiotek. The room was light controlled, but I though the picture was fine even with the light's in the room dimmed as opposed to pitch black.

Any additional opinions Mark? This is my first projector system and I want to be sure I'm heading in the right direction

Most reviews I've read recommend 100" or less for best image with the least noticeable artifacts. I've seen the Ruby on a 110" Studiotech in a light controlled room and found the brightness to be satisfactory but as the lamp ages it might start looking dim. IMHO 123" is to big and will produce a dim image on a 1.3 gain Studiotech.

Brad/Viper-Fan

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Brad/Viper-Fan
Most reviews I've read recommend 100" or less for best image with the least noticeable artifacts. I've seen the Ruby on a 110" Studiotech in a light controlled room and found the brightness to be satisfactory but as the lamp ages it might start looking dim. IMHO 123" is to big and will produce a dim image on a 1.3 gain Studiotech.
Do you think the ultramatte is a better choice or is there another high quality, positive gain screen that supports a ceiling mounted Ruby? I think the High Power does not like ceiling mounted projectors.

I had the vendor put the screen and ruby order on hold until I figure out which screen is best.

bpowers

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bpowers
Do you think the ultramatte is a better choice or is there another high quality, positive gain screen that supports a ceiling mounted Ruby? I think the High Power does not like ceiling mounted projectors.

I had the vendor put the screen and ruby order on hold until I figure out which screen is best.

If you can't lower the projector enough to make the High Power work (assuming you don't mind the narrow viewing cone) maybe the Ultramatte 200 would be best for that size screen. Some like the Silver Star, I don't.
Maybe you should consider a 3 chip DLP like the Infocus 333 or 777 (higher light output) for such a large screen.
I would reduce the size of the screen for the Ruby, you choose.

Brad/Viper-Fan

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

Hi,

I was going to buy the Da-Lite screen for the price, but have changed my mind and want a Stewart Filmscreen. I need some advice though. Here is my setup, my room final dimensions are 13' w x 18.6' L. I want a large screen, thinking of going for a 115" to 120" diagonal 16x9 screen. My projector is the Panasonic AE900u. My seating distance will be 12' from the screen for the first row and about 16' for the second row with a 10" riser. I plan on putting my PJ on the back wall with it just about even with the top of the screen so that would put the lens close to the 16.5-17' throw spot. My room will be light controlled, building it right now!

Most of the veiwing will be done in total darkness, but on occasion I will have a single can light that will be on just above the seating area (get togethers). What screen do you guys think will work best with this setup the Studiotek 130 or the Firehawk? Also, What about the PJ picture at that distance with a 115" or 120" diagonal screen? I want it to be bright and project a great image. One of my main reasons for going for the larger screen is because I have over 600 DVD's and half are 1.78/1.85 and the other half are 2.35/2.40 size. YES, I have gone through each one and checked. When I show the the 2.35 movies on a smaller screen it will be to small and lose that theater feel for me. Anyway, looking forward to your input.


Randy

Randito3

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Randito3
Hi,

I was going to buy the Da-Lite screen for the price, but have changed my mind and want a Stewart Filmscreen. I need some advice though. Here is my setup, my room final dimensions are 13' w x 18.6' L. I want a large screen, thinking of going for a 115" to 120" diagonal 16x9 screen. My projector is the Panasonic AE900u. My seating distance will be 12' from the screen for the first row and about 16' for the second row with a 10" riser. I plan on putting my PJ on the back wall with it just about even with the top of the screen so that would put the lens close to the 16.5-17' throw spot. My room will be light controlled, building it right now!

Most of the veiwing will be done in total darkness, but on occasion I will have a single can light that will be on just above the seating area (get togethers). What screen do you guys think will work best with this setup the Studiotek 130 or the Firehawk? Also, What about the PJ picture at that distance with a 115" or 120" diagonal screen? I want it to be bright and project a great image. One of my main reasons for going for the larger screen is because I have over 600 DVD's and half are 1.78/1.85 and the other half are 2.35/2.40 size. YES, I have gone through each one and checked. When I show the the 2.35 movies on a smaller screen it will be to small and lose that theater feel for me. Anyway, looking forward to your input.


Randy
Hi Randy, the Firehawk is an awesome screen but expensive. I have a Firehawk and its great. My room is 14x20 with a 110" screen.

You didnt mention how high your ceiling is. One of the things you should calculate into your screen size is from the top to the bottom of the screen. You may find out that with say a 120" that it might stretch to close to your floor depending on how high your mounting it. Having it to low to the floor might make it troublesome for your second row to view the bottom of the screen.

TomsHT

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

Randy,
I recently went down the same road...testing ST 130 with a Panny 900. Distances are very similar; throw 16', viewing 14'. I explored several screen sizes examining luminance, luminance uniformity, and resolution. It is a CH 2.35 system. Here is what I found.

With a CH system you have 20% more brightness. The numbers following are with a CH system. At that throw distance you will hit about 15 FL at center on low lamp. You will be able to go to about a 100" wide screen before going below 12 FL in low lamp. You might be able to hit 12 FL on high lamp on a 110" screen. ST 130 looks really good because of that little bit of gain...but at the throw distance, and sitting distance you are planning, with a screen wider than about 90" you will have some lack of uniformity. It will not be particularly noticable to the casual eye on a 100 IRE full field, but you can certainly measure it. As I remember, it was down about 30% at the edges on a 115" screen. On dark scenes you may notice you are losing shadow detail near the edges due to this. Is that a deal-breaker? I wouldn't think so, but at least you know what to expect with your Panny. BTW, all the above is a solid screen, not Microperf.

With regards to resolution, the Panny still looked quite good at those sizes with HD-DVD CH 2.35, but not as good as 1080p is going to look.

It seems the only risk you will have is getting the screen too big for the Panny to reach the proper luminance for a large screen in a large room. The ST 130 gain will help you with that. I personally would not choose Firehawk in that room and projector, due to the gray which will eat up too much light. If you're gonna spend a fair amount of money with Stewart, it seems logical to carefully consider giving it the best chance. If you are planning to upgrade to a higher lumen1080 machine down the road, going 110"+ might be worth it. You could limp by for while with a picture that was a little under illuminated.

Cam Man

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

Does the Firehawk also come in 119" or only 123"? I will be needing a 119" screen for my IF-7205.

f1restarter

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

There was a real good deal in the for sale section here yesterday on a firehawk 100"

TomsHT

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

Quote:
Originally Posted by f1restarter
Does the Firehawk also come in 119" or only 123"? I will be needing a 119" screen for my IF-7205.
Any size you want, up to a certain limit before it starts having seams.

nathan_h

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

Thanks for the info, nathan. Yeah i think the Firehawk would be the best option for my 7205 although i have now around 1300 hours on the lamp but it's still plenty bright even in the low lamp mode and my white living room. I think the screen that comes closest to the FH is the Da-Lite HCCV, IMO, but it cannot produce the level of detail in dark scenes like the FH nor the low blacks like it. For the price you still cant beat the HCCV, though.

f1restarter

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

Room: 17’ w x 20’ deep
Ceiling: 9’
Projector: Optoma H81
Screen: Stewart Horizontal Electriscreen Electrimask (110? Diag) - G2
Viewing Distance: 15’ back
Viewing Height (AFF): 45?
Projector Throw: 14’-6?
Project Offset Calc: Alpha = 27% translates into 14?

- What is an "acceptable" viewing pitch other than horizontal -- 3-5 degrees?
- Any real pitfalls of ordering excessive blackdrop >14"
- Like clean borders but is horizontal masking a ferrari?

Magma

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

I am building and want to install my media room myself. All I am sure of is that I want a 123" firehawk motorised perforated screen. 16:9. My room is 15ft x 18ft and have a large french door directly oppose the screen with a tall window to the left. Firehawk because I have read a lot about it on your forum.

Viewing position I anticipate will be about 12ft from screen. I am leaning towards a 3chip projector - Runco, Infocus or Sim2. I am torn between the cost of the 3chip and the picture quality. For a room of this size do I really need a 3chip DLP to get fantastic picture? Which ones would you recommend?
bolly

bolly

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

bolly: Others more knowledgeable than I can give you more detainled advice, but there are at least 2 things that I can mention. First, you will need a very BRIGHT pj, e.g., like the Mits wd-2000, or one of the 3-chip dlps', like the SIM C3X, or Inf 777. And second, you should be sure that the distance from the lens of the pj to the screen is at least 1.6 X SW (SW = screen width), to prevent hot-spotting with the Firehawk. You should have a great pic!

millerwill

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

Thanks for the info millerwill. Is there a projector that is cheaper and would do a good job at giving very good picture?


I was hoping more people will contribute to my question.

bolly

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

Quote:
Originally Posted by raoul
If that's the case then it's best to tell William what screen you're using it with too!
Okay, I called up Stewart earlier and good news, my original order for the GrayHawk was cancelled. I forgot the name of the gentleman that I spoke to but he even spoke about this thread. I was suprised. "Wait, you're from New York and you have a MF1 on the way. I read your post on avsforums." Great guy to deal with. Very helpful. I asked for the screen dimensions and I'm going with a Stewart StudioTek 130 @ 2.35:1 @ 130" diag.

I also called Meridian/Faroudja and the gentleman there said that 130" is about max. After that I'd start to lose a bit too much brightness but 130" should be alright. Very helpful man as well.

Mr. Phelps, you asked to know about the width of my screen. The viewable width is 119.5" and the height is 51". It will be flat.

CChoi83

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

Quote:
I have one four foot seating row at 14' from the screen.
Meant to say "one four seat row..."

Cam Man

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

I've searched through the Stewart website to look for masking options but I couldn't find anything that pointed to a fixed screen that has masking. I'm looking for vertical masking but it seems that it's only available to roll down screens. Does anyone know? I get this feeling that I'll have to do a DIY masking once I get my screen.

CChoi83

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

Stewart offers both vertical and horizontal masking for their fixed screens.
http://www.stewartfilmscreen.com/eng...ons/vswem.html
http://www.stewartfilmscreen.com/eng...ns/hzswem.html
http://www.stewartfilmscreen.com/eng...ions/4way.html

Dennis Erskine

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

Quote:
Originally Posted by CChoi83
I've searched through the Stewart website to look for masking options but I couldn't find anything that pointed to a fixed screen that has masking. I'm looking for vertical masking but it seems that it's only available to roll down screens. Does anyone know? I get this feeling that I'll have to do a DIY masking once I get my screen.
You need to call up Jason Turk at AVScience and talk to him about a screen. He'll sort you out with a good price and knows about all of the Stewart options. Stewarts curved screens also have masking.

raoul

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dennis Erskine
Thank you Mr. Erksine! Couldn't find a fixed screen with vertical masking, only horizontal which I didn't want.

Raoul,

Based on your opinion, would I need a curved screen? After speaking to Stewart Filmscreen, they said it was more a matter of opinion. If my screen was ginormous I would most likely need it but if not, then it's not necessary. How would I take care of pincushioning and a anormophic lens on a curved screen?

CChoi83

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

What's with your dealer? He should be able to answer these questions for you.

An anamorphic lens (depending on throw distance) can create pincushioning. The curved screen solves the pincushion. In addition a curved screen will improve uniformity. The amount of the curve required would need to come from either Meridian, your dealer, or Stewart. It is likely that neither Meridian nor your dealer have alot of experience with CH 2.35:1 applications (yet) so Stewart may be your better source; however, do your dealer the courtesy of informing him that you wish to speak to Stewart directly.

Dennis Erskine

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

Just call Jason at AVS, tell him your projector, order your anamorphic lens through him (with your rig it seems like you're in the ISCO3 league) and then they'll work out, with Stewart, what the curve should be.

For a screen your size, a curve is encouraged.

I also agree with Denis, call your dealer and tell him you're ordering your screen through someone with experience in this area.

raoul

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

I DID speak with Stewart and the gentleman told me that it was a matter of personal preference unless the screen was like 150"+. I also spoke to Mr. Pointdexter today about the ISCO and he's running a 150" flat. I don't think it'd be a problem. I'll have to call Stewart one more time tomorrow. Is there anyone that I should specifically speak to?

CChoi83

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

You can run it flat on 120" wide but you really do want to have the curve for uniformity. Mind you, on a Studiotek, the difference will be smallish. Don't sweat the curve too much if it's going to be hard however it looks like you're going top end all the way with the ISCO, Projector, etc. so you shouldn't cut corners on the screen.

raoul

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

Invest in a plane ticket and come to Atlanta and see our 120" curved screen and ISCO lens. I would also differ with Stewart in that the choice is based on physics (throw distance, optics, viewing angles).

Dennis Erskine

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

Yes, I know what you are both saying. I'm awaiting an e-mail from ISCO for recommendations based on JVC's HD10K since the Faroudja uses the same lens. My main concern was pincushioning since the MF1 doesn't have any keystone adjustments. They're not big on it.

CChoi83

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

Is the Faroudja the same as teh HD10K or the HD2K?

Did you try using:

http://www.jvcdig.com/lens_calculator.htm

the lens calculator there will let you work out what your image will look like when you dial in the correct numbers.

Other person to speak to about this is Phelps as his name is on the product. Be sure to send William all your info when you do send it for calibration, mount orientation (table or ceiling), send him the lens and if you buy an exotic screen, send him a screen sample to calibrate against.

raoul

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

Quote:
Originally Posted by raoul
Is the Faroudja the same as teh HD10K or the HD2K?

Did you try using:

http://www.jvcdig.com/lens_calculator.htm

the lens calculator there will let you work out what your image will look like when you dial in the correct numbers.

Other person to speak to about this is Phelps as his name is on the product. Be sure to send William all your info when you do send it for calibration, mount orientation (table or ceiling), send him the lens and if you buy an exotic screen, send him a screen sample to calibrate against.
The Faroudja DILA-1080pHD is based on the HD2K and the DILA-1080MF1 is based on the new HD10K which is what I'm getting.

Raoul, thanks for the suggestions. Mr. Phelps and I have e-mailed eachother a few times already. I don't think calibration is neccessary right now since the calibration was done using a Stewart StudioTek 130 screen which is also what I'm getting. I've also spoken to Mr. Rawls at Faroudja who happens to live in NY. He's doesn't have an opinion yet on curved screens but he'd wants to come by to see my setup for 2.35:1 purposes as they are working on a lens solution as well. I'd wait for Faroudja's lens but I don't want to put this off any longer and I'm pretty sure they will be using ISCO's as well.

CChoi83

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

Quote:
Originally Posted by raoul
You can run it flat on 120" wide but you really do want to have the curve for uniformity. Mind you, on a Studiotek, the difference will be smallish.
If going with a curve the 1.5 gain might even make sense because of the reduction in hotspotting that the curve would provide. I don't know if their 1.5 gain material has any other downsides compared to the 1.3 gain material though.

--Darin

darinp2

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

I agree. I thought about that but didn't want to upset CChoi any more. I mean, why not go for the VideoMatte 2.0 and have Phelps calibrate accordingly?

raoul

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

Quote:
Originally Posted by raoul
I agree. I thought about that but didn't want to upset CChoi any more. I mean, why not go for the VideoMatte 2.0 and have Phelps calibrate accordingly?
Because with the StudioTek, I most probably won't have to. This is an enjoyable experience but I don't want it to turn in to a hassle. Obviously, it takes time to do things right but right now, I don't want to spend any more time than I have to. ETA for my equipment (except screen) is due next week, Thurs-Fri. I'll get everything ready, get my screen, and if it needs to be tweaked, I'll send it to Mr. Phelps. If not, even better.

Raoul, using JVC's lens calc, it seems as if I will have a problem with keystone and pincushioning. I'm not sure if I'm doing it right. Not to mention that my dealer and I haven't exactly decided the mounting height/distance. We're both guessing anywhere from 19-22 feet or so. The room is 23 feet deep. Don't forget that I'm adding the ISCO III so the longer the better. Or am I thinking wrong?

CChoi83

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

The lens offset on the JVC is designed so that if the projector lens is at the height of the top of the screen you'll get no keystoning. Similarly, if it's a table mount, the projector should be at the bottom of the screen. Design your projector mounting accordingly.

R-S

raoul

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

Quote:
Originally Posted by raoul
The lens offset on the JVC is designed so that if the projector lens is at the height of the top of the screen you'll get no keystoning...
Not in this case. The DILA1080-MF1 has lens (image) shift.

wm

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

oh. very nice. so then will he get keystoning?

r-s

raoul

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

Quote:
If going with a curve the 1.5 gain might even make sense because of the reduction in hotspotting that the curve would provide. I don't know if their 1.5 gain material has any other downsides compared to the 1.3 gain material though.
I just did a busy bit of testing of UM 150 and ST 130 anticipating UM's 1.5 gain being necessary in my application. Thought you would like to hear results.

Although capable of an extra foot lambert or two, Ultramatte had some idiocyncracies that bear mentioning. The higher gain makes a very unforgiving surface; the slightest undulation being very visible. I am more aware of the surface of UM. The gain causes that, and the surface has tiny little sparklies that attracted my attention too much at times (high luminance in program material).

Uniformity was an important issue to look at. Edge (last quarter of area) luminance was interesting. Of course the PJ naturally has probably 10-15% edge fall-off. The gain of the screens compounded that...depending. UM had the most serious fall off, about 35%. ST was less pronounced, but cumulatively more than is allowed in the DCI digital cinema specs. It seems the most improvement on this would be made using a curved screen. Further testing revealed that ST 130 would do very well with a curve and get edge luminance up to within the DCI digital cinema specs and tolerances (actually very near the nominal specs; DCI specs nominal, and tolerances for both reference viewing theaters, and commercial theaters).

Cam Man

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

Quote:
Originally Posted by raoul
oh. very nice. so then will he get keystoning? r-s
Not if the image shift is adjusted properly. That's the point to having image shift.

wm

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

I'm installing an Optoma HD72 DLP projector in a fully light controlled room. I am planning to use a 100" Stewart screen. The projector will be mounted about 12.5 to 13.5 feet from the screen. My front seating will be probably about 12 feet from the screen.

I am trying to decide what fabric to use my dealer says I could go with either the Firehawk or Grayhawk?

Any advice on which way to go or other alternatives to be considered?

red5908

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

I am about to assemble and install my 110" diag Firehawk. I have heard that these can be quite tricky to hang, although in searching this thread, noone seems to have asked this question. Are there specific tips, or is it simply not as hard to do as I am imagining? Thanks in advance.

~JC~

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

I'm between a Screen Research 110" wide 16:9 and a Stewart Studio Tek 130 w/Micro Perf. Does anyone know the retail pricing for the StudioTek in the size I'm looking for?

At this point, I think price is the only factor I'm looking at between the two screens, but if someone has opinions as to the firehawk or other offerings please chime in. I'm planning on using the Optoma H81, which is not released yet.

--SimpleTheater

SimpleTheater

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

ScreenResearch is 0.9 gain. Stewart StudioTek 1.3 gain. The StudioTek will appear brighter. The StudioTek w/ MicroPerf will require equalization, the ScreenResearch will not.

raoul

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

Quote:
Originally Posted by raoul
ScreenResearch is 0.9 gain. Stewart StudioTek 1.3 gain. The StudioTek will appear brighter. The StudioTek w/ MicroPerf will require equalization, the ScreenResearch will not.
Yes, I'm familiar with that information. The nice thing about Stewart is they can microperf any of their screens, so if I want a neutral screen I can go that route.

THX requires equalization, but I know HAA recommends rolling of the high frequencies, and some say do NOT use the Stewart equalizer because you actually want the roll off (obviously an area of debate, since THX requires the EQ for certification).

So, back to my first question - anyone know pricing for Stewart? I don't want discount pricing because I know that's not allowed, MSRP is fine.

Thanks,
SimpleTheater

SimpleTheater

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SimpleTheater
Yes, I'm familiar with that information. The nice thing about Stewart is they can microperf any of their screens, so if I want a neutral screen I can go that route.

THX requires equalization, but I know HAA recommends rolling of the high frequencies, and some say do NOT use the Stewart equalizer because you actually want the roll off (obviously an area of debate, since THX requires the EQ for certification).

So, back to my first question - anyone know pricing for Stewart? I don't want discount pricing because I know that's not allowed, MSRP is fine.

Thanks,
SimpleTheater
If memory serves, a 110" Luxus Deluxe ScreenWall fixed screen (not a motorized drop screen) is around $2,400 MSRP.

giomania

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

Quote:
Originally Posted by giomania
If memory serves, a 110" Luxus Deluxe ScreenWall fixed screen (not a motorized drop screen) is around $2,400 MSRP.
Thanks, but I doubt that's w/micro perf or Screen Research would be out of business.

I'm getting 110" wide 16:9 quotes on SR for around $5k. If Stewart really is 1/2 the price, I'll go with them immediately.

--SimpleTheater

SimpleTheater

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SimpleTheater
Thanks, but I doubt that's w/micro perf or Screen Research would be out of business.

I'm getting 110" wide 16:9 quotes on SR for around $5k. If Stewart really is 1/2 the price, I'll go with them immediately.

--SimpleTheater
Sorry, I forgot the key ingredient in the above formula, which is the screen material: StudioTek 130 without perforation.

giomania

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bolly
Thanks for the info millerwill. Is there a projector that is cheaper and would do a good job at giving very good picture?


I was hoping more people will contribute to my question.
I think the best bet, for the money, may be the Mits wd-2000; read about it over in the projector forum.

millerwill

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bolly
I was hoping more people will contribute to my question.
You'll likely find out much more by asking about this in the projectors section of the forum.

nathan_h

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

I need Help. I am attaching a Firehawk screen that I recently purchased to an existing frame I already have. Which side of the screen should I project on, the smooth side or the rougher side? Both sides are very similar in color if not identical.

Thanks

jeff65

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

I'm planning to upgrade to the Ruby (VPL-VW100) and wanted to upgrade to a Luxus Deluxe at the same time. My setup is perhaps a little strange in that I need to mount the projector on a pedestal that is located directly behind the main viewing location approximately 1 foot above the viewers head and directly in line with the center of screen. With this setup, the viewing angle and projection angle almost coincide (I only sit 10.5 ft away from a 100" screen.)

My question is: what Stewart screen material should I get for my setup if I want to maximize black level and brightness, without hotspoting problems? I've demoed the projector on FireHawk and that seems like a natural choice, but from what I read about the FireHawk material my setup would not work due to the potential for hotspoting.

Could someone verify that FireHawk will not work and perhaps recommend something else from Stewart?

spkrgeek

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

For Jeff65, rough side is the viewing side. This should be marked with a blue sticker by the way, perhaps it's deeper in the roll, if you have not unrolled the entire fabric. Rule of thumb also is that the image side is rolled toward the interior of the roll, so should face up, if the roll is prone on a horizontal surface and the material coming off the roll is against the surface.

Spkrgeek, What is your room like in terms of light control? If the walls/ceiling/follor are darkened and all ambient light sources are controlled, then Studiotek 130 would offer less hotspotting, and more punch. But the Firehawk is not really as bad with hotspotting as some would describe, and works really well when cross reflected or ambient light is less controlled.

regards,

m Robinson

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

Quote:
Originally Posted by m Robinson
Spkrgeek, What is your room like in terms of light control? If the walls/ceiling/follor are darkened and all ambient light sources are controlled, then Studiotek 130 would offer less hotspotting, and more punch. But the Firehawk is not really as bad with hotspotting as some would describe, and works really well when cross reflected or ambient light is less controlled.
Hi Mark, Thanks for the info. My room is fairly dark in color (ceiling excepted) and well light controlled. Based on this, it seems like the Studiotek 130 is my best bet.

Another question: I currently own a pair of Stewart T Stand legs that I've been using with a screen from another manufacturer. When I order my new Luxus Deluxe do I need to have my dealer order the screen for T Stand mounting? I noticed that the Luxus installation manual had two different mounting options for T-Stands: a "standard" mounting and a "wrap-around" mounting. Do I have an option of how the T-Stands would be attached to the Luxus Deluxe or are they only mounted in the "standard" way. I'd prefer the "wrap-around" mounting where the legs go behind the screen, but wasn't sure if this was available with all screen types. Thanks again.

spkrgeek

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

I know Stewart's recommendation is that the PJ be ceiling mounted for the Firehawk. But with my cathedral ceilings this will never happen. Has anyone used the Firehawk with a table mount and if so what did you think?


Thanks,
Mike

Mike N Ike

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

Can I call you Geek for short? Depending on the age of the stands, they may have been made for a 1.5" square tube frame which mounted different (outboard of the frame), than the present Deluxe frame,(behind the frame), but no big deal.

Where the upright meets the base, you can rotate the upright 90 degrees, re-drill with a 5/16" bit, and re-install the uprights so that the fastener through-holes are on the correct axis to address the rear of the frame. Should work, will work.

m Robinson

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

Many of the Stewart range of products are angular reflective to a degree. This means that the light reflecting off the surface of the screen will be centered in distribution, on an angle complementary to the incident angle. But the fabrics do have pretty wide angle performance per increment of gain. So the short answer is that if the projector is really low, some light will end up headed toward a position higher than a seated viewer might occupy, but not to excess. What we recommend is that the projector be pulled back behind the viewer if possible, and if it is close to equal to head height it will work well.

A retro-reflective screen would direct the light more back toward the elevation of the source, so may be a way to go for you. Da-lite and Kikuchi make pretty good examples of this type of fabric.

We do have many very happy customers with low mounted projectors, and in the CRT days, it was pretty much 50/50 due to the bulk of many projectors.

m Robinson

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

Mark,
do you have any update on your Ruby? I have purchased a ruby for my 14x21x9 light controlled room. There was a screw up with my screen order and after reading this thread I am thankful I do not have the screen yet. I am now leaning toward a 123" Studiotech for the room or would the Ultramatte 200 be a better fit. I will be mounting the Ruby from the ceiling and will have a riser for the second row. First row will be 12-13' from the screen. I have seen a Ruby with the Firehawk G2 in a light controlled room and it seemed dim but it could have been the set up. Thanks for all the great information!

Gerry

WOLF35

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

She has returned to Sony. Wolf, the 123" diagonal is certainly at the big end for the calibrated light output of the Ruby. The Ruby does put out more light at shorter throws, as comprehensively measured by Tryg and Darin,(confirmed subjectively by me) so a higher gain screen could give you visible center-to-edge brightness issues, or hot-spotting at the short end of the zoom.

Ultramatte 150 would be a good choice, if you are bound and determined to have a screen that large. The hot-spotting is less than Firehawk even though the gain is higher, and the image will have more punch. The caveat is that you really need to keep the lights off, and comprehensive light damping within the room is highly beneficial as you'll get minimal perceived contrast help from the screen. This combination should yeild a minimum of 16 foot lamberts-plus in your room.

Regards,

m Robinson

Official Stewart Film Screen thread.

What screens sizes are available for the CineCurve 2.35? I cannot find this info anywhere on the Stewart website.

Brian P. Hearon

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