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Question Dri Core Delta FL subfloor ( AVS Forum Dedicated Theater Design Construction )
Updated: 2008-05-27 04:49:38 (89)
Dri Core Delta FL subfloor

I'm considering putting in a sub-floor in my basement (HT/Family Room, 2 bedrooms and bathroom). I mainly want it for the comfort level, but I read that it can help with mold. How does it do that exactly? If it does, I think I can convince my wife of the cost since she has bad asthma and allergy problems and avoided the basement in our old house because of it.

A separate question regarding this, how do you transition between rooms? i know the dricore is about an inch in height. Say I don't put it in the 2 bedrooms or in the bathroom, would there just be a 1 inch drop when I walk into those rooms, or would you recommend putting it in all rooms to keep things even. Has anyone used that in a bathroom with a ceramic tile floor?

I'll be posting my HT/family room thread in the next few days with pictures. Right now it's just studs up in a new construction home. I plan on finishing the basement over the next 5 years and hope to document the whole process. Money will be the biggest factor regarding the timeline.

Answers: Dri Core Delta FL subfloor ( AVS Forum Dedicated Theater Design Construction )
Dri Core Delta FL subfloor

Hey Jeffthx,

I have been looking for someone who has put the tile on top of the Dricore. Now my application is different because I am having the tiler put it directly on top of the Dricore. I am not sure how I missed that it isn't recommended to do so, but I need to get everything done before Xmas so I am just going to take the risk. I feel that once the tile has been fastened with the cement and then the grout has been applied, it will become one sheet anyways. I hope my impatience works out in my favour or I just threw about $1,300 in the garbage.

I should add that the tile is for the landing area at the bottom of my stairs and the bathroom. I also put the Dricore in the bedroom and theatre rooms as well, but they will have 8 lb. underlay and then carpet on top.

Southey

Dri Core Delta FL subfloor

I put Dri-Core throughout my entire basement, including the bathroom. I put the tub in place, then ran the Dri-Core right up to the edge of the tub (with a 1/4" gap, of course). I then put down some backer board, and put 1' x 1' ceramic tile on top of that. I set my vanity and toilet on top of the Dri-Core/backer/tile. This was done almost two years ago, and there is no sign at all of any cracking or stress on the tile anywhere on the bathroom floor. It looks the same today as it did when I originally installed it.

Also--This was the first (and only) time that I have ever done any type of flooring/tile work so I am definitely not an expert. My point is that if a complete idiot like me can do this without having it fall apart after two years of use, then I wouldn't worry too much about putting tile on top of Dri-Core.

jj

jeffthx

Dri Core Delta FL subfloor

I've decided to go with a thick commercial carpet that comes in 2x2 squares instead of the usual roll carpet. My thinking is that this being a basement, you're not really supposed to have padding underneath it AND with all the kids playing on the carpet, I want to be able to easily replace squares of carpet if I need to.

wayhigh

Dri Core Delta FL subfloor

Same deal here. I just told the carpet guys what I was doing and they just laid the carpet down such that it extended out to about where the drywall is on the outside of the theater and just put a metal transition strip there. When I finish the rest of the basement, they'll just pull the strip up and run my other carpet or tile or whatever I decide back into the door threshold area a little and cut the theater carpet back a bit so the intersection is under the door.

SC

ecrabb

Dri Core Delta FL subfloor

I'm finishing my basement theater with Delta-FL covered by OSB which will be covered by pad and carpet.
The rest of the basement is unfinished at this time. I'm trying to figure out how to tell the carpet guys to finish the carpet edge at the doorway/entrance to the theater.
I THINK my future flooring in the rest of the basement is going to be some kind of laminate wood floor.
Any thoughts on how I could future proof my transition?
My current thought is to buy the smallest quantity of wood floor and I can find and the matching carpet/wood transition.
Or...should I accelerate my selection process and start the wood flooring into the other area?

Thanks for any opinions.
Scott

bcrawfo2

Dri Core Delta FL subfloor

I can believe that. If you have a rectangular shaped room w/ no walls you will have minimal waste. My install of Delta FL is going well. The most difficult part of the install is working around the closets and screwing the Advantech into the concrete w/ Tapcons. It is coming down to how sturdy I want the floor vs. how much spring and noise I want. More screws are better, but at some point enough is enough.

One thing about Dricore is that the panels are actually 23-1/8" square, so the cost per square foot is a little more than the $1.48 / sq. ft. HD claims. Just FYI for those planning their project.

cycloxer13

Dri Core Delta FL subfloor

Quote:
- $1.75 per sq.ft. when you factor in waste (divide sq. ft. by 3.3 to get # panels)
Just want to add that my install of 207 dricore panels resulted in minmal waste. Two complete panels were wasted because I couldn't measure properly for the cutout for my toilet. Measured twice and screwed it up, measured twice AGAIN and screwed it up AGAIN, third time was the charm. Ended up being able to use scraps of those anyway. Wife liked the results so much that she made me go buy more to put into the storage area that will remain unfinished. I had enough left over from the original order (taking into account the wastage that I didn't need) that I only needed 7 more panels to finish that storage area too.

Tom

tlogan6797

Dri Core Delta FL subfloor

Right - these systems should not be used to solve a water flooding problem. They should be used to control moisture and dampness for flooring installs over concrete - particularly below grade. In addition they provide about an R3 insulation factor and feel softer under foot. For me, it was a way to install hardwood below grade with a minimum stack height. After everything is screwed and stapled down, my total floor height measures to 1-3/16". With a traditional subfloor built w/ 2x4's and plywood I would be over 2-1/2" thick. For added dimensional stability I went with 5/8" Advantech sheathing (a water resistent OSB w/ a 50yr warranty), but I hope to get 20-30 years out of my floor. With these new materials, if you plan everything out right and check your moisture levels, you should be able to build a floor that will last a very long time. This is much better than just throwing carpet and padding over concrete and hoping for the best. In New England carpet installs like that tend to last about 5-10 years before they start looking and smelling nasty. If you have ever ripped up old carpeting in a basement you would be horrified. For me it was enough to rip out all the carpeting in my house, though I imagine my area rugs are not much better.

cycloxer13

Dri Core Delta FL subfloor

I agree 100% cycloxer13.

Delta-FL is a continuous vapor barrier and Dricore is not, but IMO neither of these products are where you want a vapor barrier anyways. If you want/need a vapor barrier on the floor it should be 6mil plastic embedded in the slab.

Andy K.

kromkamp

Dri Core Delta FL subfloor

I put Dricore down when we did our basement, it was definitely worth it. Worth every penny. Almost everyone who comes over asks if we put "In-Floor" heating in the basement when we built. The floors are very comfortable and you only need socks even in the winter. We followed the manufacturers suggestion and put the Dricore down first and built the walls on top of them.

We didn't put the Dricore in the kitchenette and bathroom because they are tiled.

In the kitchenette and bathroom our tile guy recommended putting down cement board over the concrete so if the floor cracked the tile wouldn't because the cement board isolates it from the concrete. The cement board also raised the tile up to the same level as the Dricore.

kruh

Dri Core Delta FL subfloor

I was 50-50 on doing Dricore or going w/ the Delta FL. I have heard good things about both setups. Basically these subfloor systems work exceptionally well and unless you have serious basement flooding issues or standing water, they will work. They will not solve a persistent leaky basement problem. They are really designed to handle dampness, coldness, moisture, and humidity. They may save your floor from an occasional flood, but if significant water gets under there you will need a floor drain to get it out or you could end up with mold issues. The 1/4" gap allows a small amount of moisture to evaporate and move through the concrete floor. Here is my take:

Dricore / Subflor
pros:
- easy to handle 2x2 panels
- quick and easy install
- sealed OSB surface
- ability to float the floor
- 7/8" height
- channeled polyethylene runners on Subflor (good if u have a floor drain)
- available at HD & Lowes
cons:
- not completely sealed
- many seams
cost:
- $1.75 per sq.ft. when you factor in waste (divide sq. ft. by 3.3 to get # panels)
- $5.89 for 2x2 Dricore panel at HD
- $5.77 for 2x2 Subflor panel at Lowes


Delta FL w/ OSB
pros:
- completely sealed install w/ taped seams
- screwed down floor is solid, required for staple/nail down wood floors
- ability to customize subfloor surface material & thickness
- can float some engineered floors directly over the Delta FL w/ no plywood
- $1.18 per sq.ft. for total system including OSB & waste factor
- $.50 per sq. ft. for Delta FL rolls
- $12 for 100' roll of moisture proof sealing tape
- $16 for 75 pack of 1/4" x 2-1/4" Tapcon screws
- $16 per 4x8 sheet of 23/32" OSB

cons:
- large rolls and 4x8 sheets can be difficult to handle
- locating Delta FL (try a concrete supply house or order at Lowes)

To decide which subfloor you want to go with you have to consider your final flooring material, cost, and your DIY capabilities. In my case I wanted a solid subfloor so that I could staple down engineered strip hardwood so I chose the Delta FL system.

cycloxer13

Dri Core Delta FL subfloor

I just bought 2 rolls of Delta FL today and 2 rolls of sealing tape from a local concrete supply house to get started on my basement project. I have a 600 sq. ft. split-level walk-out basement that is partially at grade and partially below grade. I love hardwood floors and will be stapling Anderson engineered oak planks 3/8" thick x 3" wide on top of my subfloor. I plan on placing braided rugs in most rooms (particularly the theater room). On top of the Delta FL I am placing 5/8" Advantech t&g screwed to the concrete with 1/4" x 2-1/4" tapcon screws dipped in caulking, 15 per 4x8 sheet.

I did a lot of research on the different products available for high-quality subfloors. My take: If you want an easier DIY project, use the Dricore product available at HD. It is very good product and is easy to install. If you want to save a few bucks, have a few tools, and have a pickup truck, go for the Delta FL system with OSB, Plywood, or Advantech T&G on top. From there, your flooring options are limitless. This subfloor will take carpet, tile, laminate, or an engineered hardwood with ease. I would not recommend a solid 3/4" hardwood on top as none of them do well in high humidity and high moisture environments. Basically they expand and contract so much that eventually your floor will be destroyed.

I'll try to take some pictures throughout this project. I considered other products such as Subflor (available at Lowes) and other underlays such as System Platon and Superseal. I'd be happy to explain to you why I went with Delta FL.

cycloxer13

Dri Core Delta FL subfloor

Quote:
Originally Posted by dgoldade
Are you installing ceramic tile directly over top of the Dricore? I thought I read on their web site that they discourage that as the grout could crack since the floor is floating.

I want to use something like Dricore or Delta FL, but am not sure what to do with the bathroom area.

-Dave
You're correct. Sorry, I didn't mean to imply in my original reply that this was the way to do it. You're much better off laying the tile directly on the concrete. I didn't install DriCore in my bathroom and had to build the floor up prior to tiling to accommodate the height difference with the DriCore panels.

fatboyp

Dri Core Delta FL subfloor

Quote:
Originally Posted by wolverines
I'm going to put down delta-fl throughout my basement, with a floating pre-finished HW floor right on top (no subfloor - similar to a laminate application). In the laundry room I plan on putting in a tile floor. It was suggested to me (and sounds like a good idea) to put down some PT plywood, then put tile backerboard on top of that, then put the tile down on that. The small gap in height can be dealt with a threshold. I would not put tile on top of the delta-fl. The movement ability could lead to problems.

For all you delta-fl guys, where did you buy it? Lowe's special order? online?
If you can't get the item number, take the contact phone number for the delta-fl website with you to lowes. The guy at lowes had no idea what I was talking about, but he called the number and they gave him the item number and told him how to order it in the Lowes system. It was smooth sailing after that.

mbgonzomd

Dri Core Delta FL subfloor

I'm going to put down delta-fl throughout my basement, with a floating pre-finished HW floor right on top (no subfloor - similar to a laminate application). In the laundry room I plan on putting in a tile floor. It was suggested to me (and sounds like a good idea) to put down some PT plywood, then put tile backerboard on top of that, then put the tile down on that. The small gap in height can be dealt with a threshold. I would not put tile on top of the delta-fl. The movement ability could lead to problems.

For all you delta-fl guys, where did you buy it? Lowe's special order? online?

wolverines

Dri Core Delta FL subfloor

Yup, Lowe's special order.

I have their internal "Hot #" for the stuff somewhere if they can't find it in their system. It's in their under the mfg: Kosella-Dorken. Don't forget to order the roll of sealant tape that you need too.

I installed a floating laminat efloor over the top of mine, and love it.

I too, would NOT put tile over it, even with subfloor and backer board. I tiled my bathroom right over the concrete, and have a transition threshhold to the laminate/Delta-FL area...

scaesare

Dri Core Delta FL subfloor

Quote:
Originally Posted by dgoldade
I want to use something like Dricore or Delta FL, but am not sure what to do with the bathroom area.
I ended up putting the DuPont Real Touch laminate flooring over Dricore in my bath. It feels very good but I have only had it in place since September. You can check it out at HD.

crg

Dri Core Delta FL subfloor

Quote:
Originally Posted by whistlersix
You don't happen to have any pictures do you? I'd be interested in seeing how yours turned out. I'm trying to keep the fireplace as close to the floor as possible since I'll be mounting the Plasma above it. My in-laws have a fireplace in the basement and if I remember right, the hearth is right on cement floor, and the fireplace is sitting either right on the concrete or in a 2" x 4" framed space, so no more than 2" off the ground.

I think if I go with the delta-fl, I'll build a subfloor similar to what you describe for the fireplace, then run the delta-fl up to that and put the hearth on top of it.
Don't have any pics yet... unfortunately I only have a 35mm cam, so I just haven't had the time to doc the whole project (I took a good set of "pre" pictures). However Santa is bringing a dig-cam... so I'll have some quick pics after Christmas to show off.

StoneMason

Dri Core Delta FL subfloor

Are you installing ceramic tile directly over top of the Dricore? I thought I read on their web site that they discourage that as the grout could crack since the floor is floating.

I want to use something like Dricore or Delta FL, but am not sure what to do with the bathroom area.

-Dave

dgoldade

Dri Core Delta FL subfloor

Definitely use DriCore in every room if you can stretch your budget. If you can't then it's worth waiting until you can. It makes a big difference in terms of comfort level and overall warmth and provides some peace of mind in case of minor leaks.

I would also highly recommend installing heating wire under the ceramic tile in the bathroom. It's not that expensive to do and makes for nice toasty feet.

fatboyp

Dri Core Delta FL subfloor

Quote:
Originally Posted by StoneMason
this sounds like my project. we had the gas fireplace put in about six months ago... it will definately make the rooms nice and toasty. I built a small platform with 2X4's topped with 1/2" plywood. The gas fireplace was installed on top of this. I then framed and drywalled around this. When it comes down to it, how you do this is entirely a matter of preference, I've seen some installs where the Fireplace was in the middle of the wall.
Remember, in addition to the dricore (7/8"), you will have your flooring or hearth tile on top of that. Depending on the fireplace, if it is set on the concrete floor, it could impact the esthetic of the unit once all the flooring is complete.

You don't happen to have any pictures do you? I'd be interested in seeing how yours turned out. I'm trying to keep the fireplace as close to the floor as possible since I'll be mounting the Plasma above it. My in-laws have a fireplace in the basement and if I remember right, the hearth is right on cement floor, and the fireplace is sitting either right on the concrete or in a 2" x 4" framed space, so no more than 2" off the ground.

I think if I go with the delta-fl, I'll build a subfloor similar to what you describe for the fireplace, then run the delta-fl up to that and put the hearth on top of it.

whistlersix

Dri Core Delta FL subfloor

I used delta-fl and have been happy with it so far. It was very easy to install. Took about 20 minutes to put it in my 18x13' room. Another couple hours to put the plywood over top of it. I plan on putting in a wood threshold to transition from the theater to the tile floor in the bar.

mbgonzomd

Dri Core Delta FL subfloor

I looked into Dricore and Delta FL, at the behest of my contractor brother. He descirbed the usage of Delta FL for highschool basketball courts. They installed Delta FL plus two layers of plywood one in each direction horizontal and vertically throught the room. That sounded expensive. With Dri-core at about 5$ per 4 sq.ft. panel, so about $1.25 per sqft. The Delta came out to about the same price w/ two layers of plywood. I think the Delta FL would offer a more stable foundation than the tiled Dri-core construction. The tounge and grove of the Dri-core would be prone to becoming tilted or loose. I would suggest a second layer of plywood over the Dri-core.

mmoeller

Dri Core Delta FL subfloor

whisthlersix,

I have the Dricore subfloor in my basement project and do not regret the extra cost or time.

It is my understanding that the Dricore allows for air circulation beneath the subfloor and that this would encourage moisture to dry up. Also, the 2x2 squares have a single plastic "cleat" bonded underneath to discourage moisture from coming in contact with carpeting, sheetrock,etc. If it is not too late, the directions recommend laying the Dricore first and then framing your walls right over it. We did not do this because we made the decision to install Dricore after the framing was complete.

Other benefits are the ease of carpet or other flooring installation and better insulation in a cool basement. Also, I believe the sound in a theater setting is better in a carpeted room vs. hard floors. A real biggie for us is eliminating the potential for the "funky, musty finished basement smell" down the road.

We've only had our Dricore floor about 8 months but so far, so good. And we have only heard praise from any contractors that have experience working with it as far as the quality of the product.

Good luck with your project!

Kari

Kamull

Dri Core Delta FL subfloor

We are going with epoxy floors with throw rugs in seating areas throughout the basement. The only two exceptions will be marble tile in the bathroom & office. The basement will be a "slipper" area due to cool floors.

http://www.concrete-floor-coatings.com/DurallInfo.pdf

These folks have great customer service.

I'm very pleased with the floor I put down.

jeoinaforest

Dri Core Delta FL subfloor

this sounds like my project. we had the gas fireplace put in about six months ago... it will definately make the rooms nice and toasty. I built a small platform with 2X4's topped with 1/2" plywood. The gas fireplace was installed on top of this. I then framed and drywalled around this. When it comes down to it, how you do this is entirely a matter of preference, I've seen some installs where the Fireplace was in the middle of the wall.
Remember, in addition to the dricore (7/8"), you will have your flooring or hearth tile on top of that. Depending on the fireplace, if it is set on the concrete floor, it could impact the esthetic of the unit once all the flooring is complete.

StoneMason

Dri Core Delta FL subfloor

Yeah, I'm pretty much convinced that I'll do it. Unfortunately the cost will add another 6 mo. to a year to the overall project

Another question though, has anyone installed a direct vent natural gas fireplace where they have this installed? The wife wants a fireplace in the basement and I think I can squeeze one in the corner with a plasma mounted above it. I'm planning on putting the fireplace right on the floor based on the framing specs. Would I put the subfloor underneath the fireplace, or would it run up to it, but not under it?

whistlersix

Dri Core Delta FL subfloor

Do a search - there are probably a dozen or more threads on this subject.

The idea with both products is to get absorptive flooring materials like carpet and pad off the floor where they'll hold moisture and promote mold growth. By raising those materials up and leaving an air gap, whatever moisture does make it into the slab can dry naturally over time instead of collecting and mildewing. If you've ever had carpet and pad get wet, you know how impossible it is to get it to dry.

If you can afford it, I'd put it everywhere you're going to have carpet. Even with the ceramic, it keeps it off the cold concrete and gives you a little thermal barrier. There are lots of threads from folks who have installed and have nothing but good things to say about it. I don't remember hearing anything negative about it other than cost and time to install.

I bought some and was going to use it strategically, but I love the idea so I'm going to do all the finished spaces, now.

SC

ecrabb

Dri Core Delta FL subfloor

everyone seems to prefer the dricore. it seems to be an easier install.

my question is that if im going to build a front stage of about 3x17,with a curved front, filled with sand, would it be easier just to place the dricore under the stage instead of trying to cut the dricore to the curved shape of the stage?

is there any disadvantage to this? will the weight of the stage/sand affect the dricore?

bleachum

Dri Core Delta FL subfloor

For those who built walls on top of dricore, how much sound / bass energy was transmitted through the floor? I'm planning on building a double wall between the theater and the family room, and I'm worried that the dri-core may act as an acoustic couple between the floor in the theater and the rest of the house.

Should I stop the dri-core where the wall is going to be, and pick it up later, so that the two are not coupled? Would it make sense to just put a 1/4" gap in there so that the two are not?

My thought is to not worry about it, and that mass of two stud / drywall walls plus a door probably would absorb most bass energy to make it a bit of a moot point, but I"m hoping someone here has real-world experience.

91BlckGT

Dri Core Delta FL subfloor

I built a family room out of an attached garage, used dricore under engineered hardwood. Seems to work great, but I didn't put any venting in. Should I?

Not sure if it is in my head, but getting a bit itchy legs while sitting in this room (had alot of rain this year too). Hope its not a mould issue (haven't seen any..)
thanks.

tooquiet

Dri Core Delta FL subfloor

If you feel the need you can cut vent holes every so many feet and then place a vent grill to allow for greater ait circulation. I believe the dricore website discusses this in the installation notes or the f.a.q.s'

oman321

Dri Core Delta FL subfloor

My only concern is that as the concrete slab may emit a musty smell that would be released into the room if vented inside. I'm thinking i should have sealed the floor first, then did the dricore.

If I try to vent to outside, it will either cool the floor (in winter), or lose heat if air pulled from inside.
Also have the option of pushing heat from the furnace through, and vent to inside (possible problem of smell again).

tooquiet

Dri Core Delta FL subfloor

Quote:
Originally Posted by wutang1
I am planning to do the same think using Delta FL and engineer laminate floor to save height in the basement. Just curious if your floor feel warmer now with the Delta installed?
My basement concrete floor is just covered with cheap carpet with foam backing (may be 1/8" type) and it's cold even in summer. If I install Delta FL, do you think I should take out the cheapo carpet or leave it and install Delta on top of the carpet? The carpet is still in good shape though. Any comment is appreciated.
Well, the basement was uinfinished with bare concrete prevously, so I didn't have a previous point of comparison.

That having been said, the laminate floor feels jus tlike other laminate floors I've been on in wood-framed rooms. That is the Delta-FL seems to be doing a good job insulating the cold concrete.

I'm not so sure I'd want carpet under it. That might cause issues particularly with moisture.

scaesare

Dri Core Delta FL subfloor

What about placing a riser on top of Delta-FL and plywood? Will the added weight of the riser cause the Delta-FL dimples to collapse? Since they recommend framing walls on top of Delta-FL and plywood/OSB I would think a riser should be okay as well. But I would appreciate feedback.

easterner

Dri Core Delta FL subfloor

Quote:
Originally Posted by easterner
What about placing a riser on top of Delta-FL and plywood? Will the added weight of the riser cause the Delta-FL dimples to collapse? Since they recommend framing walls on top of Delta-FL and plywood/OSB I would think a riser should be okay as well. But I would appreciate feedback.
Their product literature has the compression strength ratings, I believe. I suspect that a riser would be fine, in that the framing would spread out the load just as much as the feet of the furniture would (if not more). Additionally, you typically have a flooring surface over the top (plywood, wooden flooring, etc...) as well.

scaesare

Dri Core Delta FL subfloor

Quote:
Originally Posted by wutang1
If I install Delta FL, do you think I should take out the cheapo carpet or leave it and install Delta on top of the carpet? The carpet is still in good shape though. Any comment is appreciated.
I don't have Delta Fl, but I think you would want to take the carpet out, if you left the carpet in any moisture that might get in would be soaked up by the carpet, and that would defeat the purpose of the Delta Fl...hopefully someone with experience will be able to tell you for sure.

e-bear88

Dri Core Delta FL subfloor

I also give a thumbs up to drycore.
I put it in our theater/game roome area. I also put it in the "snack bar" area and installed tile over it. Before you all gasp.... All you do is anchor the drycore tiles to the concrete floor with 5 tapcons per panel, believe me, the tiles will not go anywhere. Then I laid a layer of Hardibacker cement boad set in thin set over the Drycore and screwed it down to the drycore while the thin set was still wet. Let that dry and install the tile. Been down 18 months and no cracks and solid as a rock. I have a full size refrigerator that has been rolled over the tiles, no problems.


Skers

Dri Core Delta FL subfloor

Quote:
Originally Posted by sunsetbeach
engineered wood floors are durable and cheaper than solid floorings
hhhhmmmmmm.

mbgonzomd

Dri Core Delta FL subfloor

I stagger the tiles when I did my floor. If you plan on doing so than placement of last tile is the key. Also before you put your last tile in, walk around the floor for a last minute fix. A rubber mallet is useful in tapping the panels together use a scrap piece of Dricore when tapping. A rug and paddling has been place down over the floor for more than a year now no problems plus looks and feels great, lets not forget it also helps with the sound.

Silver-Fox

Dri Core Delta FL subfloor

I only had one doorway to deal with - I ended up trimming the bottom of it but that was just to go over the carpeting outside of my theater room. Unfortunately I didn't know about Dricore before I finished the rest of my basement so the carpet is installed right on top of the concrete in the room that is connected to my theater room. This caused about a 1" variation in height that I had to deal with.

I built my theater room with double walls so my doorway is extra wide. I ran the Dricore in my theater room right up to where the first door jam started on the inside of the theater room. I then cut a 1" by 10" board so it would fit between the door jams and tapered it from the top of the Dricore to the concrete. My carpet installers are coming this Friday to install so hopefully that will work out for them.


Image 1. Tapered board transitioning Dricore to concrete


Image 2. Tapered board between door jams

musicmanic

Dri Core Delta FL subfloor

Quote:
Originally Posted by scaesare
I didn't put plywood over the top of it, as I was installing laminate flooring, which didn't require it.
I am planning to do the same think using Delta FL and engineer laminate floor to save height in the basement. Just curious if your floor feel warmer now with the Delta installed?
My basement concrete floor is just covered with cheap carpet with foam backing (may be 1/8" type) and it's cold even in summer. If I install Delta FL, do you think I should take out the cheapo carpet or leave it and install Delta on top of the carpet? The carpet is still in good shape though. Any comment is appreciated.

wutang1

Dri Core Delta FL subfloor

I want to install Delta FL this coming week. Its for a home I just bought. The subfloor is already sone, but the guy put 2x4s standing up and then a 3/4 plywood, so my subfloor is almost 4 1/4". I figure with Delta-FL, I will gain at least 3 " in height.

Now being from Canada, price for a roll here is $236 for 328sq feet. It sounds like its much cheaper in the US. Who seels it? maybe I can take a little drive and pick some up. I have 1300 sq feet to do.

Also, would any of you recommend using the same plywood? Its like new, but only problem is that its not tpngue and groove and obviously has screw holes in it. Did you guys nail down your plywood over the delta FL?

mcu

Dri Core Delta FL subfloor

Quote:
Originally Posted by mcu
I want to install Delta FL this coming week. Its for a home I just bought. The subfloor is already sone, but the guy put 2x4s standing up and then a 3/4 plywood, so my subfloor is almost 4 1/4". I figure with Delta-FL, I will gain at least 3 " in height.

Now being from Canada, price for a roll here is $236 for 328sq feet. It sounds like its much cheaper in the US. Who seels it? maybe I can take a little drive and pick some up. I have 1300 sq feet to do.

Also, would any of you recommend using the same plywood? Its like new, but only problem is that its not tpngue and groove and obviously has screw holes in it. Did you guys nail down your plywood over the delta FL?
Here in the states Lowe's sell it special order. I paid about $0.50 a sq. ft. for it.

I didn't put plywood over the top of it, as I was installing laminate flooring, which didn't require it.

scaesare

Dri Core Delta FL subfloor

engineered wood floors are durable and cheaper than solid floorings

sunsetbeach

Dri Core Delta FL subfloor

For those interested, here are some pictures of my Dri-Core install in my Home Theater:

http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showt...04#post7445404

Dave

GranTheaterO

Dri Core Delta FL subfloor

Dave -

Thanks for the tutorial pictures. Looks great.

Seems like your floor was a little uneven that you needed to sue the leveling spacers. Do you have any noise problems when walking on the floor, eg: clanking where the floor is still a bit uneven, squeaking from the T&G, etc ?

Brent

kiwishred

Dri Core Delta FL subfloor

Quote:
Originally Posted by kiwishred
Dave -

Thanks for the tutorial pictures. Looks great.

Seems like your floor was a little uneven that you needed to sue the leveling spacers. Do you have any noise problems when walking on the floor, eg: clanking where the floor is still a bit uneven, squeaking from the T&G, etc ?

Brent
Hi Brent, Yes, I do have a few squeaks but considering it's the Home Theater and you can only hear the squeaks when the room is silent, its not a big deal. I'm really glad I went with a raised floor in there. I can heat that room quickly and it stays nice and warm even when the rest of the basement is 59 degrees this time of year if I have the vents closed.

Dave

GranTheaterO

Dri Core Delta FL subfloor

I just installed DriCore this weekend. Well almost all of it. I under est what I needed. So I need to go pick up another 10 tiles. I do have the carpet laid on it. But no padding yet.

When I walk on it I can hear it squeak just a little. But I have a feeling when the carpet is attatched with padding underneath. It will be nice and quiet.

The sound is noticible better then the concrete that i have had for the past few years.

And even tho we are going thru a storm now and it is really cold. I don't need to have my space heater on. It is nice and toasty as is.

Arialis

Dri Core Delta FL subfloor

Arialis -

Give the Dricore a little time to settle in. I had a few places that made some noise when walked on (of course, the FIRST place the wife stepped made noise!). Now there are only one two places, and I'll ramset those before covering.

Good luck,
Tom

tlogan6797

Dri Core Delta FL subfloor

Just a quick question.

I have read that you can attach your walls directly to the Dricore. I was wondering this: If you attach your walls to the concrete and then lay Dricore with the 1/4" gap, would that allow some sound isolation (i.e. vibration) from the rest of the house? The gap created would be covered with baseboard for asthetic purposes.

Thanks for any reply.

jmw5150

Dri Core Delta FL subfloor

I did Delta FL about 1 year ago in my basement. My walls and doorways were already in so I bought an undercut saw and trimmed my doorways. You can pick up a manual one for about $15 from HD or you can rent a power version if you have many doorways. Then you trim a bit off the door to clear your finished floor height. It was about 1" in my case and was not a problem at all. This is much less work than reframing the whole doorway. Also, yes you want to leave about a 1/4" gap at the walls. This will all be covered with trim. My installation has seen 90deg+, high humidity summer days as well as single digit winter nights and so far all is well. I have minimal creaking or noises and really not much expansion or contraction (I'd estimate 1/16"). However, I did install 23 Tapcon screws per 4x8 sheet of Advantech I laid on top of the Delta FL. Also, I know most people on this forum do carpet for audio reasons, however, I stapled down a 3/8" thick engineered hardwood. It is not as good for acoustics, but it is absolutely beautiful. Regardless, these subfloor systems, when installed properly, are excellent and well worth the time and cost to install. You also get an R3 value with these systems and your floors will be much warmer than bare concrete.

cycloxer13

Dri Core Delta FL subfloor

Quote:
Originally Posted by whistlersix
Question for those of you who have installed Dricore/Delfta-FL in places that already had walls at least framed up. What do you do for doorways? Meaning, I have a door already framed in. I want to put a subfloor in, but my builder didn't account for that. When I actually install the door after the subfloor, do I need to cut the door down 7/8" or do is it best to just reframe the door? What did you do? I have 6 or 7 doors this will affect if I run the dricore in my whole basement (hallway, bedrooms with closets, bathroom and storage rooms).
Just trim up the bottom of the door a bit.

scaesare

Dri Core Delta FL subfloor

Question for those of you who have installed Dricore/Delfta-FL in places that already had walls at least framed up. What do you do for doorways? Meaning, I have a door already framed in. I want to put a subfloor in, but my builder didn't account for that. When I actually install the door after the subfloor, do I need to cut the door down 7/8" or do is it best to just reframe the door? What did you do? I have 6 or 7 doors this will affect if I run the dricore in my whole basement (hallway, bedrooms with closets, bathroom and storage rooms).

whistlersix

Dri Core Delta FL subfloor

Quote:
Originally Posted by whistlersix

Another question though, has anyone installed a direct vent natural gas fireplace where they have this installed?
Frame your firebox first whether it be in the corner or on a wall. The direct vent fireplace will sit nicely in the recess area and then you can dri-core up to the toe plate. Some people do their dri-core differently, I lay it after dryall but before the trim....personal preference I guess.

Fuzzybear50

Dri Core Delta FL subfloor

Quote:
Originally Posted by oman321
Dricore recommends that if you do the walls first, to then do the drywall before placing dricore down. Reason being that you might not be able to suck up all the compound dust from the gap and this could cause an issue with moisture/mold.
Makes sense. Thanks

belmontboy

Dri Core Delta FL subfloor

Quote:
Originally Posted by Southey
Hey Jeffthx,

I have been looking for someone who has put the tile on top of the Dricore. Now my application is different because I am having the tiler put it directly on top of the Dricore. I am not sure how I missed that it isn't recommended to do so, but I need to get everything done before Xmas so I am just going to take the risk. I feel that once the tile has been fastened with the cement and then the grout has been applied, it will become one sheet anyways. I hope my impatience works out in my favour or I just threw about $1,300 in the garbage.
I believe this is a bad move. the slightest movement of the dricore panels will cause cracks to appear anywhere between the tiles. the dricore panels are supposed to be allowed to expand a bit and retract a bit (it will happen when the temperature and humidity rate fluctuates, I have observed it many times in my basement). no glue or cement will keep the panels from doing so...

stef2

Dri Core Delta FL subfloor

Dricore recommends that if you do the walls first, to then do the drywall before placing dricore down. Reason being that you might not be able to suck up all the compound dust from the gap and this could cause an issue with moisture/mold.

oman321

Dri Core Delta FL subfloor

Quote:
Originally Posted by jmw5150
Just a quick question.

I have read that you can attach your walls directly to the Dricore. I was wondering this: If you attach your walls to the concrete and then lay Dricore with the 1/4" gap, would that allow some sound isolation (i.e. vibration) from the rest of the house? The gap created would be covered with baseboard for asthetic purposes.

Thanks for any reply.
I was wondering the same thing. I would think that the sound isolation would be better with the 1/4" gaps rather than having the subfloor extend into the next room. It's probably just a bit easier to install if you do it before the walls are up - less cutting and waste.

I'm planning on installing the dricore after the walls are up, but before driwalling - so I'll leave a larger gap.

belmontboy

Dri Core Delta FL subfloor

Quote:
Originally Posted by kromkamp
I agree 100% cycloxer13.

Delta-FL is a continuous vapor barrier and Dricore is not, but IMO neither of these products are where you want a vapor barrier anyways. If you want/need a vapor barrier on the floor it should be 6mil plastic embedded in the slab.

Andy K.
If you already have the vapor barrier via the 6mil plastin embedded in the slab, will there be a problem by having another vapor barrier installed via DRIcore or Delta-FL? I've read for walls that having 2 barriers just allows moisture to sit between them.

Mike_Stuewe

Dri Core Delta FL subfloor

You should find that price break down per sq. ft. the delta or platon options ususally come in cheaper than the dri-core. Of course there is a little more labor involved, but to me the extra labor (me) was worth the lower cost of admission for basically the same result.

Regards,

RTROSE

RTROSE

Dri Core Delta FL subfloor

A buddy of mine installed the delta in his basement and he has an older home with very uneven basement floor. He should have at the very least skim coated it with floor leveler to smooth it out, but he didn't. Because of this uneveness the laminate flooring which he used on top of the delta has areas which shift & press down on the delta which does creat the popping sound you speak of.

Use a self leveling floor cement which will prevent this from being an issue for you rx-8.

oman321

Dri Core Delta FL subfloor

Does anyone here have any experience with a subfloor such as these used over a concrete basement floor with in-floor radiant heat?

Our current basement floor has 2" foam sheets and a plastic vapor barrier under the slab that encases the heat tubing... curious if I need to do a Dricore type product before using carpet in the new HT.

daniel@burst

Dri Core Delta FL subfloor

The Delta-FL has been installed since March and there are no popping sounds - I didn't do anything special during the installation.

rx-8

Dri Core Delta FL subfloor

Not sure if it was a popping sound, but there was definately a crinkeling type of sound. I didn't level my floors and so the 5/8" osb was floating a little high (1/8"-1/4") in some areas. I borrowed a hammer drill and put in Tapcom screws. They are a little expensive (approx. $19.00 for 25 screws) but they are holding the osb down and I don't have anymore sounds.

Kensmith48

Dri Core Delta FL subfloor

I have not yet decided whether to use DRIcore for my basement project, but I did come across this interesting review in Fine Woodworking where the reviewer claimed it raised the measured temperature 4.5 degrees. In my situation the basement has duct work but the furnace is undersized for the house (lousy cheap builders) so I will probably go with it because I am hoping it will save me the cost of an extra (electric) heating system since my basement is pretty warm in the winter already.

I suspect if I use a different product like Delta FL with OSB over it the performance would match DRIcore, but the reviewer does not mention that combination.

finewoodworking.com/Workshop/WorkshopArticle.aspx?id=31719

iamme6

Dri Core Delta FL subfloor

Wow, you really dug up an old thread.

I put dricore in my entire basement, including the theater. There is a noticable difference in perceived temperature but I can not verify 4.5 deg difference. No more walking on a cold, concrete floor.

I highly recommend dricore or similar floor systems.

budk

Dri Core Delta FL subfloor

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kensmith48
You're talking about Dri-Core though. I'm asking questions about Delta FL.
The principles are the same

ScruffyHT

Dri Core Delta FL subfloor

What do you smart folk think about this:

Concrete/Delta FL/Kahrs recommended underlayment material/Kahrs engineered floor for rec room
Concrete/Delta FL/Padding/Carpet for Home Theater and Bedroom
Concrete/Cement Board/low voltage heating elements/porcelain Tile for bathroom

Thanks

tsandoval

Dri Core Delta FL subfloor

bump

tsandtsand

Dri Core Delta FL subfloor

Concrete/Delta FL/Kahrs recommended underlayment material/Kahrs engineered floor for rec room - this is OK
Concrete/Delta FL/Padding/Carpet for Home Theater and Bedroom - need a subfloor between the delta fl and the underlay
Concrete/Cement Board/low voltage heating elements/porcelain Tile for bathroom - need a subfloor between the heating elements and the delta fl

ScruffyHT

Dri Core Delta FL subfloor

I read somewhere that you can get popping sounds when the Delta-FL product is applied to and uneven concrete floor. Someone recommended putting a high quality landscape fabric UNDER the Delta-FL to eliminate the popping sounds. The landscaping fabric should not create a second vapor barrier which should be avoided.

Have others experienced this popping sound?

What do you think about putting landscaping fabric under the Delta-FL, other than the slight increase in cost?

Thanks in advance.

rx-8

Dri Core Delta FL subfloor

Since I just did this about four weeks ago I can tell you waht I did...

THe dri core runs up to about 1/2" from the wall. The bottom of the dri core *IS* a vapor barrier. Don't put anything underneath it. It's tongue and groove, and no moisture is coming through it once it's assembled.

I framed on the dricore. I glued 4'x8' sheets of 1/2" styrofoam on the outside of the framing, down to the bottom of the framing. I stuck some sill plates under the bottom sill plate of the wall as additional vapor insulation incase the floor has gaps (it did).

The vapor barrier is then continous all the way up to the top of the wall. There is a 1/2" air gap all the way around the outside, and a 1/4" on the floor. This will allow enough natural air circulation to keep the must smell away.

I then caulked the inside of the framing to keep the vapor out too.

When I installed the faced insulation in the framing, I faced the vapor barrier on the outside, since you want to avoid two vapor barriers.

If you actually have a water problem, seal the top of the top sill plate where it meets the wall with great stuff foam. However, note that this will now couple the framing to the wall, and transmit some vibration from the framing to the wall.

91BlckGT

Dri Core Delta FL subfloor

I have put Delta FL in 2 houses and have never heard this popping sound you speak of

Dont think any kind of liner is recommended under the Delta FL

I would call/email the company and ask if you think your floors are that uneven

ScruffyHT

Dri Core Delta FL subfloor

You're talking about Dri-Core though. I'm asking questions about Delta FL.

Kensmith48

Dri Core Delta FL subfloor

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kensmith48
You're talking about Dri-Core though. I'm asking questions about Delta FL.
I was replying to the previous 6 posts, that were.

I've not used the delta flooring, but I would leave an air gap anyway for two reasons:
1. Most rooms aren't true, so if you cut the subfloor expecting a perfectly straight wall, it might not fit right.
2. leaving an air gap enables the floor to be isolated from the side walls, so all the energy is directed into the floor.

91BlckGT

Dri Core Delta FL subfloor

Actually, the Dricore.com website recommends a 1/4" gap (minimum) all around the room.
from their website:
" Complete one row at a time across the room allowing for a 1/4” gap around walls and room obstructions.

I left a 3/4" gap and built my walls on top of the dricore panels. I'm 100% happy with the results.

budk

Dri Core Delta FL subfloor

I was looking into the Delta FL system for my basement and looking at the directions, it states to lay the Delta Fl as tight as possible up against walls and partitions. Why is everyone stating to leave a 1/4" gap? I believe that is what Dri-Core says but not Delta FL. I could see leaving a gap for the usb or plywood though, for expansion & contraction. The directions for Delta FL don't say anything about building a wall directly on top of it so why are people stating to do so?
Just want to clarify before starting my project.
TIA,
Ken

Kensmith48

Dri Core Delta FL subfloor

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike_Stuewe
If you already have the vapor barrier via the 6mil plastin embedded in the slab, will there be a problem by having another vapor barrier installed via DRIcore or Delta-FL? I've read for walls that having 2 barriers just allows moisture to sit between them.
You will want to check with your local building/codes enforcement to see what they recommend.

Regards,

RTROSE

RTROSE

Dri Core Delta FL subfloor

I used the dri-core and was very happy with it. It is much easier then doing it the old fashioned way with 2x4s on the floor, rigid insulation, and plywood over the top.

Most foundations are not perfectly square, so I got as close as I could on the foundation walls, but probably averaged an 1/8 or 1/4 gap on most. I framed all my walls on top of it. I used 3 inch concrete nails (.22) on the exterior sills to lock everything in place down to the concrete.

Good product, only had it briefly, but so far am quite happy with it.

badata2d

Dri Core Delta FL subfloor

Quote:
Originally Posted by MacBuster
I was thinking the same thing.

Except that the DriCore installation instructions clearly suggest running the Dricore right up to the concrete foundation wall.

Is a wall which faces the foundation conisidered an "exterior wall" ?
That would be my definition of it

ScruffyHT

Dri Core Delta FL subfloor

I was thinking the same thing.

Except that the DriCore installation instructions clearly suggest running the Dricore right up to the concrete foundation wall.

Is a wall which faces the foundation conisidered an "exterior wall" ?

MacBuster

Dri Core Delta FL subfloor

Quote:
Originally Posted by MacBuster
I've got my dricore, and I'm considering the method whereby you lay the dricore and then frame on top.

What I don't get is: for walls that face the concrete slab, where do you put the poly to seal the wall? If you poly the wall as normal (and it's sitting on dricore, then the vapor barrier is broken by the gap the dricore creates under the wall. If that makes sense.
I used Delta FL and 5/8" OSB ... the outside basement walls were already framed/insulated/vapour barriered as normal ... I lay the delta FL up to 1/4" away from the framed exterior walls ... the idea of Delta FL/OSB or Dricore is to create a air gap between the concrete basement floor and your new subfloor. The interior walls were then framed on top of the Delta FL/OSB.

I dont think it would be effective to frame the exterior walls on top of the dricore.

if you have a high water table it allows the concrete to breathe off any excess moisture that it may wick up from below

ScruffyHT

Dri Core Delta FL subfloor

Quote:
Originally Posted by pilatusfo
I'm not sure if anyone has mentioned it but here's what i'm doing on my floors and I've seen it many times on Holmes on Homes. Take either 1.5" or 2" thick foam boards and put them on the concrete floor. They come in 4x8' sheets and they give you a R5 for every 1" thickeness as long as giving a vapour barrier as well. Leave a 1/2" gap from all the walls which you will then get spray foam and fill all these gaps for a 100% seal. Tape all the seams with the Red tape (not sure what it's called). You can now put a plywood over top and tapcon it the floor. My neighboor did this and it worked great. If you want to try it out just buy one smaller sheet of the foam board 2x8' put it on the floor and walk on it. Your feet stay nice and toasty. I was going to spend thousands on a in floor water heated floor and when i went to his place i changed my mind. Price it out it may save you over the Dricore stuff which is really expensive up here.
I was wondering about this too as I've seen the same shows and Mike Holmes also mentions this approach for basements in his renovation books. I believe this is the product he uses:

http://www.owenscorning.com/worldwid...D=5&Language=1

Cipher

Dri Core Delta FL subfloor

Comment and a question.

I just had a radon system installed in my home - because I had a radon problem. But I noticed that after the system was up and running, no more humidity and musty smell. When I asked the installer about this, his comments were that 40% of his installs are in homes that DON'T have a radon problem, rather, they want a more convenient way to get the moisture and humidity out under the slab.

So for a musty/humid reason, I've got that fixed. But I am still kinda thinking about DriCore just from the temperature aspect of the slab. My concern is how well does DriCore handle an uneven floor? My concrete is not perfectly flat by any means, and my thinking here is that it is better to just put padding and carpet down, rather than DryCore, which may highlight (and make creaking sounds) due to this problem.

Thanks!

monorailfan

Dri Core Delta FL subfloor

I'm not sure if anyone has mentioned it but here's what i'm doing on my floors and I've seen it many times on Holmes on Homes. Take either 1.5" or 2" thick foam boards and put them on the concrete floor. They come in 4x8' sheets and they give you a R5 for every 1" thickeness as long as giving a vapour barrier as well. Leave a 1/2" gap from all the walls which you will then get spray foam and fill all these gaps for a 100% seal. Tape all the seams with the Red tape (not sure what it's called). You can now put a plywood over top and tapcon it the floor. My neighboor did this and it worked great. If you want to try it out just buy one smaller sheet of the foam board 2x8' put it on the floor and walk on it. Your feet stay nice and toasty. I was going to spend thousands on a in floor water heated floor and when i went to his place i changed my mind. Price it out it may save you over the Dricore stuff which is really expensive up here.

pilatusfo

Dri Core Delta FL subfloor

I've got my dricore, and I'm considering the method whereby you lay the dricore and then frame on top.

What I don't get is: for walls that face the concrete slab, where do you put the poly to seal the wall? If you poly the wall as normal (and it's sitting on dricore, then the vapor barrier is broken by the gap the dricore creates under the wall. If that makes sense.

MacBuster

Dri Core Delta FL subfloor

Concering the weight.... the following is from the dricore website:

"The DRIcore subfloor panels can support over 5,724 lbs. per square foot, as tested by an independent lab, so heavy furniture and equipment like pool tables, weight sets and pianos are no problem."

budk

Dri Core Delta FL subfloor

tooquiet, nothing a good dehumidifier shouldn't be able to handle. Put a small pump in it if possible and you won't have to empty it all the time. If you have moisture problems, the lack of vent holes will do nothing to keep the musty smell away.

bleachum, as budk states weight wont be a problem. However, you can make the first part of your stage straight and then after dricore add a curve. I just so happen to have an example for you to look at . Check out my thread below, my initial stage is on the first page I believe and the curve is added later on. Good Luck.

oman321

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